What Pan Can I Bake A Cream Cheese Pound Cake In?

Business By cakemommy Updated 5 Jun 2014 , 4:40am by SystemMod1

cakemommy Posted 3 Jun 2014 , 2:46pm
post #1 of 31

Hi All,

 

 

I have a request for a cream cheese pound cake.  I have never made one.  The customer's budget is $200 and is requesting 100 servings.

 

I researched this recipe and it's either baked in a tube pan, loaf pan or a bundt pan.  Can this type of cake be baked in a sheet or a round?  He also wants it frosted with buttercream.  Again, through my research, I have seen nothing but glazes drizzled over the top of cream cheese pound cakes.

 

Any and all help will be appreciated.  The cake is for June 13th.

 

 

Thank you,

 

 

Amy

30 replies
pastychef Posted 3 Jun 2014 , 3:03pm
post #2 of 31

AYou can bake it in a round pan, just try not to fill them too full or bake too large of a size, because if the baking time has to be increased to compensate for the pan then the edges will be really dry.

pastychef Posted 3 Jun 2014 , 3:06pm
post #3 of 31

AAnd of course you can frost if with buttercream! You can assemble it like a regular cake. Personally I might brush some simple syrup on the layers prior to buttercream but lots of bakers use sturdy cakes like pound cake for carving, etc. In my experience there's not much that you can't slap some buttercream on.

MimiFix Posted 3 Jun 2014 , 3:23pm
post #4 of 31

The classic recipe for cream cheese pound cake works quite well in cake pans or sheets. Actually, better than in deeper tube, loaf, or bundt pans because it has a tendency to be under-baked (even when testing correctly).

 

Buttercream is a nice finish for this cake. I've successfully used it for full sheets - two layers with a strawberry whipped cream filling and strawberry buttercream frosting.  

 

BUT it's a very expensive cake. Before you accept the order I hope you look at ingredient costs and time involved. 

cakegrandma Posted 3 Jun 2014 , 3:34pm
post #5 of 31

cakemommy,

mimifix is correct as far a pans and costing out. In my opinion  isn't enough for  servings.  Suggest that she choose something else to fit into her budget.

cakemommy Posted 3 Jun 2014 , 3:44pm
post #6 of 31

AThank you both very much. I am happy that the recipe will work well in a sheet. I am making his Navy retirement cake for the morning if the same day. The pound cake he wants for an evening celebration at his church where he is also the pastor. He had originally sought a bakery for the pound cake for 100 people and was quoted over $400. That's when I was asked to do it and told $200 is his budget.

I stress enough with every cake I do including the cake I have sitting on my counter right now. Making the CCPound cake.....I just don't know!!

MimiFix Posted 3 Jun 2014 , 4:09pm
post #7 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakemommy 

I stress enough with every cake I do including the cake I have sitting on my counter right now. Making the CCPound cake.....I just don't know!!

 

Maybe I can help you decide. 

 

There are other cake choices. The customer does not need the cream cheese cake, he just wants this particular cake. He does not need to feed 100 people cake, he wants to feed them. 

 

Are you in business? A business must make money or there's no point in being in business. Or are you a hobby baker? If your hobby is baking, then it's a matter of if you would enjoy donating your time to this man's event.

cheeseball Posted 3 Jun 2014 , 4:21pm
post #8 of 31

Quote:

Originally Posted by MimiFix 
 

 

Maybe I can help you decide. 

 

There are other cake choices. The customer does not need the cream cheese cake, he just wants this particular cake. He does not need to feed 100 people cake, he wants to feed them. 

 

Are you in business? A business must make money or there's no point in being in business. Or are you a hobby baker? If your hobby is baking, then it's a matter of if you would enjoy donating your time to this man's event.

We have a winner!

cakemommy Posted 3 Jun 2014 , 4:22pm
post #9 of 31

AI am a hobbyist, 14 years running. I just can't bite the bullet and take advantage of the Cottage Law here. I never advertise myself. I realize my cakes are advertisement in and of themselves. I bake/decorate for people my husband and I know only. He happens to be at a larger command this tour and I have plenty to keep me busy.

cheeseball Posted 3 Jun 2014 , 4:36pm
post #10 of 31

So then you have to decide if you're willing to give this cake away, because they're asking for a premium cake for a lot of people.  $200 doesn't compensate you, but if that's fine with you, cool:)

MimiFix Posted 3 Jun 2014 , 5:03pm
post #11 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakemommy 

I am a hobbyist, 14 years running. I just can't bite the bullet and take advantage of the Cottage Law here. I never advertise myself. I realize my cakes are advertisement in and of themselves. I bake/decorate for people my husband and I know only. He happens to be at a larger command this tour and I have plenty to keep me busy.

 

Bless your heart, now you have me totally confused. You live in a state that has a cottage food law but you're not willing to become legal? You charge for your products but you don't think you are running a business? 

cakemommy Posted 3 Jun 2014 , 5:49pm
post #12 of 31

Nope!  Not running a business.  As you well know with your 30 plus years experience, we all have to start somewhere.  Some people go on to bigger and better businesses and others do perfectly fine keeping it at more of a low key level.  Baking and decorating isn't for everyone, even those who have been doing it for a few decades.  I enjoy what I do and I will continue to do so, as a hobby.

 

As per my original post, thank you for your feedback.

MimiFix Posted 3 Jun 2014 , 5:58pm
post #13 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakemommy 
 

I enjoy what I do

 

Nice! That's the important part!!

IAmPamCakes Posted 3 Jun 2014 , 8:26pm
post #14 of 31

AFor the most part, my cakes are more of a hobby than a business, but I set up a business so I could legally charge for cakes/baked goods. Getting legal is usually really easy, and it's best for everyone in the long run.

shanter Posted 3 Jun 2014 , 10:33pm
post #15 of 31

I am completely mystified by people who sell cakes but claim they do not have a business. How do you list the income on your tax return?

thecakewitch Posted 3 Jun 2014 , 10:37pm
post #16 of 31

Quote:

Originally Posted by shanter 
 

I am completely mystified by people who sell cakes but claim they do not have a business. How do you list the income on your tax return?

Income from having fun and passion, of course!

shanter Posted 3 Jun 2014 , 10:49pm
post #17 of 31

I'll bet that would go over big with the IRS! :D

AZCouture Posted 3 Jun 2014 , 10:51pm
post #18 of 31

ANo, not everyone started that way. I resent that blanket statement.

AZCouture Posted 3 Jun 2014 , 10:53pm
post #19 of 31

A

Original message sent by MimiFix

Maybe I can help you decide. 

There are other cake choices. The customer does not [I]need[/I] the cream cheese cake, he just [I]wants[/I] this particular cake. He does not [I]need[/I] to feed 100 people cake, he [I]wants[/I] to feed them. 

Are you in business? A business must make money or there's no point in being in business. Or are you a hobby baker? If your hobby is baking, then it's a matter of if you would enjoy donating your time to this man's event.

And sticking to immediate family is best, as undercutting and taking business from the actual businesses is not cool. You know, the ones that [B]do[/B] depend on it for their survival. Nothing wrong with being a hobby for family, keep it fun.

AZCouture Posted 3 Jun 2014 , 11:34pm
post #20 of 31

AOh, the undercutting reference was not necessarily appropriate in my post, so apologies if that does not apply to you.

AZCouture Posted 4 Jun 2014 , 12:31am
post #21 of 31

AHow do you stress over every cake if it's just a hobby? Isn't a hobby something you do that is completely stress free, and one hundred percent enjoyable? I can't remember the last time I stressed over watering and pruning my gardens (my hobby).

cheeseball Posted 4 Jun 2014 , 12:36am
post #22 of 31

Quote:

Originally Posted by AZCouture 

How do you stress over every cake if it's just a hobby? Isn't a hobby something you do that is completely stress free, and one hundred percent enjoyable? I can't remember the last time I stressed over watering and pruning my gardens (my hobby).

You should have seen me cussing the squash bugs when they destroyed my little cucumber babies.  Or when the cutter ants destroyed the entire yard.  Pure-t stress.

AZCouture Posted 4 Jun 2014 , 12:38am
post #23 of 31

AYeah, I can see that! If anything eats [B]MY[/B] squash or watermelons, I'll be raging! :D

bilbo Posted 4 Jun 2014 , 12:44am
post #24 of 31

Quote:

Originally Posted by AZCouture 

No, not everyone started that way. I resent that blanket statement.

Thank you!!

thecakewitch Posted 4 Jun 2014 , 1:11am
post #25 of 31

When you use the words "order" or "customer", when you bake "400 cookies" or wedding cakes, when your state has a Cottage Food Law but you won't get licensed, when $2/serving is not undercutting...

 

Yes, it's just a hobby.8O

AZCouture Posted 4 Jun 2014 , 1:35am
post #26 of 31

AYep, I'd have to agree when I read it like that.

MBalaska Posted 4 Jun 2014 , 2:40am
post #27 of 31

I've baked the Betty Crocker Pound Cake recipe in a 9" x 3" cake and it worked out fine.

I've baked my modified recipe in 9" and 8" rounds ( x2" )and that recipe worked out fine also.

cakegrandma Posted 4 Jun 2014 , 4:37pm
post #28 of 31

Quote:

Originally Posted by cakemommy 
 

Nope!  Not running a business.  As you well know with your 30 plus years experience, we all have to start somewhere.  Some people go on to bigger and better businesses and others do perfectly fine keeping it at more of a low key level.  Baking and decorating isn't for everyone, even those who have been doing it for a few decades.  I enjoy what I do and I will continue to do so, as a hobby.

 

As per my original post, thank you for your feedback.


The legal description of taking money for services rendered is a Business. It is so easy to become legal under the Cottage Food Act, check into it.  I was a legal business, still am under the CFA,  but my point being, before to become legal I had to turn in a bunch of paper to the Dept. of Agriculture, be inspected, pay for the license and pay some other fees to run the business. Not to mention my overhead, $$$$$$ out the door to whomever was to be paid that month. Since the CFA came into effect, it sure is easier, I can bake at home, pay my insurance keep up my LLC and Food Handlers License. I keep track of all my expenses and mileage, anything for my taxes.  Even though I am an at home baker I do not give my cakes away cheaper than others in the market.  If you think you can make up for dollars that you are losing in volume, "it is like windshield wipers on a goats butt, it ain't gonna work!" :-t

pastychef Posted 4 Jun 2014 , 7:39pm
post #29 of 31

AWindshield wiper's on a goat's butt... That is the best thing I've read in a long time!

cakebaby2 Posted 4 Jun 2014 , 7:50pm
post #30 of 31

OP, If you've been taking orders (a lot of orders since 2008) then you probably should go legal. It's a matter of time before some disgruntled bakery turns you in to whoever regulates home bakers in the States.

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