How Do I Get My Cake Levelled

Decorating By Mina Cakes Updated 29 May 2014 , 2:41pm by cai0311

Mina Cakes Posted 20 May 2014 , 9:06am
post #1 of 12

AI always have an issue with my cake coming out uneven. However hard i try to level it with a serrated knife i find out its not even and the edges arent sharp like i want it to look. I was thinking of getting a cake strip to help reduce the dome and wilton's cake leveller but not so sure if it'd help. Pls any help, suggestions, advise.

11 replies
cai0311 Posted 20 May 2014 , 1:33pm
post #2 of 12

ADon't waste your money on the Wilton leveler. The bends and cuts the cake wonky all the time. I don't know how many cakes a year you make, but it you okay spending some cash invest in an Agbay leveler. I have the regular size double bladed one. It is amazing!

FrostedMoon Posted 20 May 2014 , 1:48pm
post #3 of 12

Agree with not wasting money on a Wilton leveler.  Agbays are great, but pricey if you aren't doing a lot of cakes.  I purchased a new level like you use for hanging pictures or leveling building projects.  Wash it well and only use it for cakes.  I put the level on top & trim a little here, level again and trim a little there, make sure you turn the level in all directions to get it completely even.  Used to take a while, but now it's quite quick as it helped me learn how to cut more level. Hope that helps!

KathleenC Posted 21 May 2014 , 5:00pm
post #4 of 12

I wasted my money on a Wilton Ultimate Cake Leveler.  :sad:  Don't do it.

Claire138 Posted 21 May 2014 , 5:12pm
post #5 of 12

Agbay, Agbay, Agbay. The end.

AZCouture Posted 21 May 2014 , 5:12pm
post #6 of 12

I have not ever had to level a cake in my life, and I certainly don't trim anything off either. Either drop your temperature and bake longer, so it doesn't balloon up and make a hump, or gently press on it every so slightly when it comes out of the oven with a flat palm and a dish towel. Even if there is a slight hump or high area, that doesn't affect the finished tier if youre icing correctly. 

Claire138 Posted 21 May 2014 , 5:15pm
post #7 of 12

Quote:

Originally Posted by AZCouture 
 

I have not ever had to level a cake in my life, and I certainly don't trim anything off either. Either drop your temperature and bake longer, so it doesn't balloon up and make a hump, or gently press on it every so slightly when it comes out of the oven with a flat palm and a dish towel. Even if there is a slight hump or high area, that doesn't affect the finished tier if youre icing correctly. 

 

I've done those in the past but bc I'm somewhat not too coordinated although they came out good I find the Agbay to be more accurate.

Jeff_Arnett Posted 22 May 2014 , 11:56am
post #8 of 12

Many years ago before we had fancy leveling saws, we used to use this trick.

 

Cut enough thread or dental floss to be able to fold into a two or three stranded length a few inches wider than the cake. 

 

Hold the thread/floss tightly and use it to saw the top of the cake off level with the top of the pan.  Just place on the edge of the pan, and move bake and forth in a sawing motion as you move across the top of the pan until you have sliced the uneven top off.  Of course this works best if your cakes are baked to the height of your pans. 

 

And yes...don't waste your money on those flimsy Wilton levelers...you will only be disappointed.  Baking strips really do help a whole lot.  You can make your own out of old towels, newspaper and foil, etc. 

 

Here's a video to show you a quick way to make one: 

 

http://www.cleanvideosearch.com/media/action/yt/watch?v=1eU6UpHH3-s

Rohini Posted 22 May 2014 , 12:59pm
post #9 of 12

Quote:

Originally Posted by AZCouture 
 

I have not ever had to level a cake in my life, and I certainly don't trim anything off either. Either drop your temperature and bake longer, so it doesn't balloon up and make a hump, or gently press on it every so slightly when it comes out of the oven with a flat palm and a dish towel. Even if there is a slight hump or high area, that doesn't affect the finished tier if youre icing correctly. 


I agree with AZCouture. I too never trim anything off of my cakes. I use a damp kitchen towel to flatten any bumps that may occur immediately when the cakes come out of the oven. I also have started to bake my cake layers separately. This too helps in getting nice and even layers. I weigh the batter and then divide it by the number of layers I need and then use a kitchen scale and pour the appropriate amount into pans of the same size. I'm a home baker and bake mostly for my kids so this works for me. But I guess when you have a business it might not be so practical.

leah_s Posted 22 May 2014 , 2:11pm
post #10 of 12

One word - Agbay.  You'll never understand how you caked withut it. 

Mina Cakes Posted 29 May 2014 , 1:07pm
post #11 of 12

AThanks all am so grateful. I dont usually bake much so i guess i have to try out the strip and save up for agbay.

cai0311 Posted 29 May 2014 , 2:41pm
post #12 of 12

AI have the double bladed one, so I can level the cake (but to be honest I next to never have to level a cake) and cut throught the middle of the tier for filling purposes at the same time. I love it!

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