Looking For A Pound Cake Expert

Baking By teddy0826 Updated 21 May 2014 , 9:49pm by AZCouture

teddy0826 Posted 18 May 2014 , 11:00pm
post #1 of 9

HI EVERYONE,

I"M LOOKING FOR ANY ADVICE THAT ANYONE HAS TO GIVE ON OLD FASHIONED BUTTER POUND CAKES.  I WORK IN A BAKERY AS A DECORATOR AND ALL WE MAKE FOR OUR CAKES IS OUR POUND CAKES IN MANY FLAVORS.  THIS CAKE HAS BEEN WITH THIS BAKERY FOR 20 YEARS. I HAVE BEEN COMING OBSESSED WITH TRYING TO FIX IT.  WE ALWAYS GET LINES IN OUR CAKES.  SOME ARE SAVEABLE BY CUTTING THE LINE OUT AND SOME ARE JUST SO BAD WE HAVE TO TOSS IT AND REBAKE.  WE HAVE TRIED EVERYTHING UNDER THE SUN.  I JUST DONT THINK POUND CAKES ARE MENT TO BE BAKED IN REGULAR CAKE PANS.  MAYBE THATS WHY EVERYONE BAKES THEM IN LOAF OR BUNT PANS.  ANY IDEAS WILL BE GREATLY APPRECIATED.

8 replies
as you wish Posted 18 May 2014 , 11:10pm
post #2 of 9

ACould you explain what you mean by lines in the cakes? Lines of what? And where in the cake? (Also, would you please turn off your caplocks; it looks like you are yelling at us. :) )

teddy0826 Posted 18 May 2014 , 11:37pm
post #3 of 9

THEY ARE KNOWN AS SAD LINES.  USUALLY LOCATED AT THE BOTTOM OF CAKE.

-K8memphis Posted 19 May 2014 , 12:03am
post #4 of 9

where the cake fell you mean? and the consistency is different-- the cake falls because that unbaked part down in there that makes the sad line is the part that pushes up outa the middle and cracks the top of a pound cake at the end of the bake if it's in a loaf pan or a bundt pan it can bake ok but not so much in a pan without the hole like you said --

 

i'm not saying i'm an expert--you sound like the expert because i think you got it correct as the pan being the problem

winniemog Posted 19 May 2014 , 12:28am
post #5 of 9

AIn a professional pastry kitchen, when cooking certain tea cakes, we would want to control the shape and way the cake rose and split in the centre to ensure consistent results. We did this by slashing the raw cake batter, as you would do a loaf of unbaked bread. In a loaf pan, the split on top is usually central, but if you're using a different-shaped pan, maybe you could slash the unbaked cake batter in its pan to generate a more controlled rise and perhaps avoid the sad lines?

scrumdiddlycakes Posted 19 May 2014 , 12:44am
post #6 of 9

I have never heard of sad lines, are they like tunnels at the bottom?

I bake up to 20" rounds of pound cake, I have to be careful with my temperatures or they crack on top, but I'm not sure I have seen what you are describing.
A lot of people over mix pound cake, that can cause tunneling, cracking and dryness, so can the wrong amount of sugar. I'm probably misunderstanding the issue though, a picture would be great.

mzteaze Posted 21 May 2014 , 9:26pm
post #7 of 9

This is a common problem.  My mom has issues when she makes a pound cake from time to time.

 

But here is an article that considers common reasons for the "sad lines":  http://www.myrecipes.com/how-to/cooking-questions/preventing-gummy-steaks-in-pound-cake-00420000022445/

as you wish Posted 21 May 2014 , 9:34pm
post #8 of 9

AI noticed that you started a thread about this a couple of years ago; I take it none of the suggestions offered then worked for you? http://cakecentral.com/t/746707/line-in-pound-cake#post_7307643

AZCouture Posted 21 May 2014 , 9:49pm
post #9 of 9

Quote:

Originally Posted by as you wish 

I noticed that you started a thread about this a couple of years ago; I take it none of the suggestions offered then worked for you?
http://cakecentral.com/t/746707/line-in-pound-cake#post_7307643

Well that's just weird. :-?

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