New Formulation Of Wilton Fondant

Decorating By Slyvia Updated 2 Dec 2014 , 11:27pm by kabukik

Slyvia Posted 17 May 2014 , 11:29am
post #1 of 25

I was wondering if anyone is having issues with the new formulated Wilton fondant.  I have been using it for many year (10) with no issues.  My latest cake with a disaster when I used the new fondant.  It's too soft and grainy.  I had a lot of cracks, bubbles and tearing.  Managed to cover some of the tearing, but I won't be buying this fondant again.  Any suggestions for another type of fondant that I don't have to make myself?

24 replies
ShedaCakes Posted 17 May 2014 , 12:07pm
post #2 of 25

AI am covering with the new fondant right now and I am extremely disappointed :( I have been using wilton fondant for two years now with no problems. It was my preferred fondant. After this weekend I will have to change brands. It's ridiculously soft, and sticky. Terribly disappointing! Wilton was so convenient to buy locally, now that is out the window. I'm really unhappy right now and I have two more cakes to get through today :(

nikki1227 Posted 17 May 2014 , 12:26pm
post #3 of 25

How does it compare to Satin Ice? I have found SI to be fairly soft as well, also, how does it taste?

ShedaCakes Posted 17 May 2014 , 12:35pm
post #4 of 25

AIt undoubtedly taste way better, but as far as working with it, it's worse than satin ice. I tried satin ice for a little while and I didn't like how soft it was so I decided to stick with wilton. Now, even satin ice is more firm than wilton. And satin ice still taste better so wilton has no advantage over satin ice now.

remnant3333 Posted 17 May 2014 , 12:38pm
post #5 of 25

Everything Wilton makes is "made in China". There is no quality control in China. This does not surprise me that the fondant is no good!!! I do not use fondant but if I ever did I would find a recipe and make my own. I am sure there are fondant experts here on this site that could enlighten all of us about which fondant is the best and whether or not to make your own. I have heard that marshmallow fondant is pretty good. I am sure you could get many recipes that you could try and make your own. Good luck.

nikki1227 Posted 17 May 2014 , 12:39pm
post #6 of 25

Thank you for the reply, I was going to try the new Wilton, I think my plans just changed lol

ShedaCakes Posted 17 May 2014 , 12:48pm
post #7 of 25

AI am familiar with making fondant but choose to use store bought fondant just to make the process easier. I'm pretty sure I'm going to start making fondant again from now on. Lol I can tell you how depressed I am right now!

Inga1 Posted 17 May 2014 , 12:59pm
post #8 of 25

I am still a beginner compared to most of you here! Just finished Course 3 of the Wilton Method at my local Michael's store. Final cake was covered in fondant. I made Elizabeth Merrick's MMF, which uses a pack of the old Wilton fondant. It turned out absolutely fabulous! The cake went to my daughter's school for volunteer appreciation meeting. I asked her if people ate the fondant or peeled it off. She said they ate it all and commented on how delicious it was! Here is a picture of the cake.

 

The next photo was my first attempt at any type of fondant. It was only MMF. The cake was for my daughter's bridal shower.

Slyvia Posted 17 May 2014 , 2:53pm
post #9 of 25

Can you give me the recipe you use to make your own fondant?  I might give it a try.

SweetShop5 Posted 17 May 2014 , 3:12pm
post #10 of 25

The new fondant is great. I tried it for the first time this weekend on a wedding cake but like you mentioned I thought it was WAY too soft. Its good for small cakes, but I wouldn't suggest covered big cakes with it. The fondant stretches very easily because its soft.

FioreCakes Posted 17 May 2014 , 8:20pm
post #11 of 25

Did any of you try adding some powdered sugar to thicken it up? 

Slyvia Posted 20 May 2014 , 9:02pm
post #12 of 25

We tried using powdered sugar and it didn't help.  I also tried cornstarch and that made it gritty.

Inga1 Posted 21 May 2014 , 12:22am
post #13 of 25

http://www.food.com/recipe/marshmallow-fondant-255227

This is the recipe I used for the MMF

Slyvia Posted 21 May 2014 , 12:29am
post #14 of 25

Thanks Inga1.  I'll have to try it.

hartleyflats Posted 23 May 2014 , 1:20am
post #15 of 25

Quote:

Originally Posted by SweetShop5 
 

The new fondant is great. I tried it for the first time this weekend on a wedding cake but like you mentioned I thought it was WAY too soft. Its good for small cakes, but I wouldn't suggest covered big cakes with it. The fondant stretches very easily because its soft.

So would you say covering an 8" round would be okay?  I haven't used fondant in about two years and since I'm starting my own business I figure I'd better get used to it again, so I bought some of the new Wilton fondant.  My oldest (who doesn't like fondant) has graciously offered to be the guinea pig and allowing me to use fondant on her birthday cake next weekend. I hope I don't have issues with it...it's expensive stuff.  I made my own fondant once and it was a disaster LOL!

superstar Posted 23 May 2014 , 1:42am
post #16 of 25

Try adding a little tylose powder to the fondant & let it stand for a couple of hours, that is how I firm my fondant.

Megan Ford Posted 21 Aug 2014 , 7:31pm
post #17 of 25

AHate, hate, HATE THE NEW WILTON FONDANT! Too stretchy, reacts HORRIBLY to humidity, gummy, and won't set up. I had fondant fins for a cake out for THREE days and it still didn't harden! I'm trying Satin Ice in hopes that it will be better, I have to order it online but if it saves me a ton of headache and frustration it's WORTH IT! Unfortunately I still have quite a bit of Wilton fondant left, no idea what I'm going to do with it now.

JulzyCakes Posted 21 Aug 2014 , 8:13pm
post #18 of 25

Here is a link to a great video from The Twisted Sifter making her homemade fondant. I use her method, but since I do not have a large Kitchenaid mixer I used my hand held mixer with the dough hooks that came with it and it still works great. I use this alone for small cakes and to decorate sugar cookies. I typically use all Satin Ice fondant for large wedding cakes because it has a more smooth, polished look, but you could use a mixture of the two, especially if you have some Wilton fondant you just want to get rid of!!!

 

http://www.thetwistedsifter.com/video-makingfondant.php

leah_s Posted 21 Aug 2014 , 8:16pm
post #19 of 25

Fondant really isn't supposed to set up for something like fins.  You'd use a 50/50 mix of fondant and gumpaste, or straight gumpaste for something like that.

JWinslow Posted 21 Aug 2014 , 8:33pm
post #20 of 25

Quote:

Originally Posted by Inga1 
 

http://www.food.com/recipe/marshmallow-fondant-255227

This is the recipe I used for the MMF


Just an FYI - Liz Marek put out a notice that adjusts her recipe for the new Wilton.  If you buy a 5lb box just use one whole silver package - all other ingredients stay the same.

The Boss Posted 24 Aug 2014 , 5:58pm
post #21 of 25

AThe new Wilton fondant is a high grade product from the UK. The old Wilton was terrible and not fit for a dog. There is nothing wrong with the fondant!

FioreCakes Posted 24 Aug 2014 , 6:09pm
post #22 of 25

AI agree with the boss. How many of you know a fondant that stays soft on the cake a day later? Not many. Add this fondant to your arsenal of supplies. Most figures are not meant to be just fondant, the old wilton was more gumpaste than fondant, that's why people used it for figures and not on a cake, yuck.

JWinslow Posted 25 Aug 2014 , 3:45am
post #23 of 25

Quote:

Originally Posted by FioreCakes 

I agree with the boss. How many of you know a fondant that stays soft on the cake a day later? Not many. Add this fondant to your arsenal of supplies. Most figures are not meant to be just fondant, the old wilton was more gumpaste than fondant, that's why people used it for figures and not on a cake, yuck.

 

There are quite a few fondants out there that stay soft.  Carma Massa, ifigourmet (my personal favorite), Fonderific and Duff to name a few.  

superstar Posted 25 Aug 2014 , 11:36pm
post #24 of 25

Try adding a little tylose powder to the fondant!!!

kabukik Posted 2 Dec 2014 , 11:27pm
post #25 of 25

I am new at using fondant, but I just finished doing a cake for the birthday of the daughter of a close friend, and the Wilton fondant worked great. It does taste better than the old one but I still try to make the fondant layer a thin as possible, so tearing is more probable. And for rolling it, yes it was soft but it worked better for it rolled out faster, and it needed less kneading, so it doesn't have a lot of time to dry out (I'm still a bit slow with the process :) ). But it didn't tear, stretched or bubbled on me. 

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