Attention Fruit Cake Makers, Is Marzipan Necessary?

Decorating By rosech Updated 6 May 2014 , 1:52pm by rosech

rosech Posted 4 May 2014 , 9:28pm
post #1 of 8

AGood day I always marzipan my fruit cakes and let dry for about a week before applying fondant. A friend told me recently that most local cakers were not applying marzipan anymore but 2 layers of fondant. She however highlighted that marzipan was necessary becoz of its flavor. I understand that the purpose of marzipan is for preventing fruit cake juices getting to the fondant and discoloring it. So today I applied two layers of fondant to an anniversary fruit cake. The order was confirmed two days ago so I did not have time for marzipanning. I really loved the process!! Its way better than applying marzipan, waiting then applying fondant. I want to switch over to what others are doing. However I want to understand if the flavor of marzipan is really necessary before doing so. TIA!!!!

7 replies
cazza1 Posted 5 May 2014 , 12:09am
post #2 of 8

We were taught back in the dark ages that you needed to marzipan but I haven't for about 5 years now and have never had any cake bleed and I only apply one layer of fondant (I do not do sell cakes).  I quite often leave my fruitcake on the table to look at, once it is decorated, for weeks, so they have been well tested.

Whether or not you want marzipan for taste is a personal thing.  Some people love it, some hate it, so you will probably want to discuss it with your customers as some will expect it and some will be glad to do away with it.

 

Just a note.  I personally think that marzipan gives a far better surface to work on than straight cake but you do get used to the change.

rosech Posted 5 May 2014 , 9:01am
post #3 of 8

Thank u so much. Brides order their cakes 3 months in advance and I bake their cakes when they confirm. From time to time they ask on progress. When I mention the marzipan stage, most of them do not understand what I will be talking about. I have to explain what it is. M thinking maybe I should just go the fondant only path since most don't understand what it is anyway.

rosech Posted 5 May 2014 , 4:01pm
post #4 of 8

ASo I was talking about this with a friend and she says marzipan helps keep moisture in the cake. Is it different from two layers or one thick layer of fondant?

DaysCakes Posted 5 May 2014 , 4:55pm
post #5 of 8

I definitely prefer to use marzipan around my fruit cakes but there is an increasing number of people who hate it. Back in the 80s my teacher said that it was to help to stop spores from forming as it protects the cake.  I have no idea if this is factual but back in those days, brides would keep the top tier of their cake for the first child's christening cake - and I can say that a fruit cake with marzipan will last definitely for around 3 years!  Am guessing that this is a bygone trend since nobody seems to keep that tradition going any more! 

rosech Posted 6 May 2014 , 12:50pm
post #6 of 8

Quote:

Originally Posted by DaysCakes 
 

I definitely prefer to use marzipan around my fruit cakes but there is an increasing number of people who hate it. Back in the 80s my teacher said that it was to help to stop spores from forming as it protects the cake.  I have no idea if this is factual but back in those days, brides would keep the top tier of their cake for the first child's christening cake - and I can say that a fruit cake with marzipan will last definitely for around 3 years!  Am guessing that this is a bygone trend since nobody seems to keep that tradition going any more! 


Here in my country people still like keeping their cake. So if I use two layers of fondant it means that spores may form and the cake will not last?

cazza1 Posted 6 May 2014 , 1:42pm
post #7 of 8

Well all I can say is that I only use one layer of fondant and my cakes stay moist. I find the fondant acts like an air tight barrier when applied properly.  The biggest problem I have had is if the cake is too moist in the first place then the fondant will start to dissolve from the inside.  But then I have had this happen with marzipan as well.  When I did my Mum and Dad's 50th wedding anniversary cake when we cut the cake the entire layer of marzipan had completely disintegrated.  The cake was delicious as it had marinated in the sugar mix.  The longest I have kept a cake on a board (rather than in an air tight container), though is 4months or so. Have never kept one for a year.

I also have quite a bit of alcohol in my cakes so I don't think any self respecting spore is going to come near them.

rosech Posted 6 May 2014 , 1:52pm
post #8 of 8

Quote:

Originally Posted by cazza1 
 

I also have quite a bit of alcohol in my cakes so I don't think any self respecting spore is going to come near them.

So it means that what prevents spores is the alcohol. Thank u.

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