Jennkrem Posted 1 Mar 2005 , 6:40pm
post #1 of

Ok, when is it that you ABSOLUTELY, POSITIVELY HAVE TO use wood dowels when stacking a cake?

i.e., I want to make a Vikings cake for my mother for her birthday. The bottom layer will be 10 inches the top layer 6 inches, both round. Do I need to use wood dowels for this?? Or are they used when doing say a 10 inch double and a 6 inch double??

Clarification would be nice. Her birthday is Monday so I will be baking away this weekend. icon_biggrin.gif

5 replies
MrsMissey Posted 1 Mar 2005 , 6:52pm
post #2 of

I think you will get a lot of different opinions on this one. Personally...whenever I put one cake on top of another..........I use dowels, period!! (unless it is just a tiny half ball cake or tiny half egg shaped cake) IMHO...even a small cake on top of another cake might be just enough to squish out the filling, if not worse, in the cake below and distort it in some way! I prefer not to take chances! I like to do things once and be done and not worry about "what if"? thumbs_up.gif

CarolAnn Posted 1 Mar 2005 , 7:02pm
post #3 of

I agree with Missy. I won't stack cakes without using dowels. It's so easy to do and and worth the peace of mind, even with smallish cakes.

kate Posted 1 Mar 2005 , 10:43pm
post #4 of

If your cakes are one layer each it would be fine to stack them without dowels. If they are two layer tiers than you would need dowels.

tcturtleshell Posted 2 Mar 2005 , 6:00am
post #5 of

I never used dowels to stack 1-2" cake on top of another 1-2" cake. I have made several cakes like you describe & never used dowels. If the size is bigger then a 10" then I would use a cake board between each cake. I don't even use cake boards when doing that size & under~

awela Posted 5 Mar 2005 , 7:52pm
post #6 of

Cakes are heavier when filled in. You would not like it to be ruined, I would suggest using straws in the area that you'll be positioning the top tier. icon_smile.gif

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