Graduation Mechanic Cake

Business By zelinax33 Updated 2 May 2014 , 7:12am by Smckinney07

zelinax33 Posted 2 May 2014 , 6:22am
post #1 of 15

I have to make a mechanic graduation cake. I'm new to cake decorating and I'm doing a similar cake in the picture.I need help of how to structure this cake so it wont collapse. Any comments and suggestions is highly appreciated.

 

14 replies
Smckinney07 Posted 2 May 2014 , 6:52am
post #2 of 15

AThis might sound mean but since you said you are new to decorating this might be much more difficult then you'd think. I tell myself if I can't look at a cake and have a general understanding of how it should be constructed then I probably can't guarantee a quality product for my customer. Again, this isn't meant to be discouraging, it's just a more complicated cake.

That said, I don't know your skill set, so if you think you can do it then I'd highly recommend a practice run!

You said a similar cake, I'd use a wooden base board with a center pole drilled into the base with a flange. The size of the middle tier looks huge in the picture, I would use styro or RKT for part (or all) of the bottom half. You'll need some other things from the hardware store, depending on how your wanting to build the rest of the cake. That's where I would begin.

zelinax33 Posted 2 May 2014 , 6:57am
post #3 of 15


I know and I understand what your saying. I think I can do it . Like a challenge. I am going to do a practice run in a week or two and thank you so much.

Smckinney07 Posted 2 May 2014 , 7:02am
post #4 of 15

AOk I took a second look at that cake if you use my idea you won't need the additional board on top of the bottom tier (which in my opinion looks sloppy) the center cake isn't that huge but it looks like they cut off part of the tire, the bottom part, so they could support it with that board I would get rid of-hope that makes sense. Their tire isn't perfectly round (which is why I suggested using something other then cake to support the bottom, or even half, of the tire-this will alleviate the majority of the pressure from the tire). You'll still need dowels and whatever other internal supports you're used to.

Smckinney07 Posted 2 May 2014 , 7:05am
post #5 of 15

AI'd do a search for internal support/structure so you'll have a nice visual of what I'm talking about. Good luck!

zelinax33 Posted 2 May 2014 , 7:08am
post #6 of 15

Okay . Thanks so much for helping me. I will post a pic when I do my practice run.

zelinax33 Posted 2 May 2014 , 7:08am
post #7 of 15

Okay . Thanks so much for helping me. I will post a pic when I do my practice run.

zelinax33 Posted 2 May 2014 , 7:08am
post #8 of 15

Okay . Thanks so much for helping me. I will post a pic when I do my practice run.

zelinax33 Posted 2 May 2014 , 7:08am
post #9 of 15

Okay . Thanks so much for helping me. I will post a pic when I do my practice run.

zelinax33 Posted 2 May 2014 , 7:08am
post #10 of 15

Okay . Thanks so much for helping me. I will post a pic when I do my practice run.

zelinax33 Posted 2 May 2014 , 7:08am
post #11 of 15

Okay . Thanks so much for helping me. I will post a pic when I do my practice run.

zelinax33 Posted 2 May 2014 , 7:09am
post #12 of 15

Okay . Thanks so much for helping me. I will post a pic when I do my practice run.

zelinax33 Posted 2 May 2014 , 7:09am
post #13 of 15

Okay . Thanks so much for helping me. I will post a pic when I do my practice run.

zelinax33 Posted 2 May 2014 , 7:09am
post #14 of 15

Okay . Thanks so much for helping me. I will post a pic when I do my practice run.

Smckinney07 Posted 2 May 2014 , 7:12am
post #15 of 15

AI'd love to see how it turns out! Cool concept, your welcome.

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