How To Word Cake Contract

Business By wickeddelish Updated 2 May 2014 , 6:33pm by wickeddelish

wickeddelish Posted 30 Apr 2014 , 3:14pm
post #1 of 13

I have recently started a legal out-of-my-home cake business.I have finished my initial contract and I'm finalizing my separate contract to be signed upon delivery and I'm having some issues with the wording. Besides the outdoor event hazards/liability, etc. what I want to say is "You are signing this because you are accepting this cake from me and you are happy with how it looks, it is what you wanted and you have no complaints about it". I want to avoid a phone call the following day that it looked terrible and they want their money back after they have already eaten it. (I've read enough horror stories to know that people will do this to get a free cake) Any suggestions on how to say this clearly and concisely in the contract? Thanks!  

12 replies
bakernoob Posted 30 Apr 2014 , 3:26pm
post #2 of 13

Maybe "Upon the signing of this contract, you agree that the goods received are as expected, and that any cosmetic issues will not exist after."

wickeddelish Posted 30 Apr 2014 , 3:28pm
post #3 of 13

Ah. Thanks! That's exactly what I was trying to do and the words just weren't coming to me. 

-K8memphis Posted 30 Apr 2014 , 3:29pm
post #4 of 13

i have a bit different take on this--i understand the desire to avoid as much drama as possible but sometimes we might be too far thinking--even though over thinking is one of my specialties --

 

i don't know about the wording you want  but i'm just saying that a piece of paper is no insurance against the phone call -- and with all due respect  i would not sign that for a pizza delivery before i ate the pizza kwim? plus finding the responsible person is a lesson in futility --it would often be the bride and she's busy getting married yknow? i think you showing up at that point would be alarming--

 

getting 'the phone call' is part of the job--it happens rarely if ever--being prepared and not being surprised by it is good--signatures won't prevent it imo --

 

just some thoughts for you

cupadeecakes Posted 30 Apr 2014 , 3:59pm
post #5 of 13

Yeah, most of the time when I deliver wedding cakes, no one is there, maybe a DJ, or some venue staff, but they're busy doing their own jobs and have no idea if the cake you're bringing is even the right cake.  You might find yourself waiting a long time before someone comes around to sign the delivery document.

 

I understand your concern though.  I ALWAYS take a couple of "proof of life" cell photos after I have delivered and setup the cakes.  If anything happens, it's my proof that the cake didn't look that way when I delivered it.  I have never had a problem (knock on wood) so it hasn't been an issue for me.  I am interested to hear what others do...

wickeddelish Posted 30 Apr 2014 , 4:06pm
post #6 of 13

I agree,  I was going more drama-free than practical. 

 

I guess what both of you are saying makes a lot more sense. I'm not even thinking clearly. Getting this going is A LOT of hard work. I was expecting that though. My mind's just a little frazzled. Once I get all of these things out of the way, I'll be clear-headed again. Thanks so much for your help. 

-K8memphis Posted 30 Apr 2014 , 4:59pm
post #7 of 13

oh for sure i getcha--drama free is the best--just wish we could regulate it  somehow -- especially with family but i digress-- but yeah sometimes unwarranted and even warranted criticism comes into focus maybe even head on at 60mph --it is vital to have a handle on how to respond in that event--to be aware it can happen to us in the real world--excellent---

 

people who have thier own businesses are driven and must be assertive in order to survive--i think these strengths have to be transformed when handling customer service issues--you're not gonna let yourself get run over but you gotta shift into a different gear--i think you're doing great that you'll be all prepared if and when --

 

tons of best wishes for a great today and a lovely, drama-light  business to follow

wickeddelish Posted 30 Apr 2014 , 5:13pm
post #8 of 13

Fortunately, I was in retail management for 10 years. Luckily I have people skills to deal with any negative issues that may pop up. 

 

Thank so much for your kind and informative words. I say this every post, but thank goodness these forums exist. This cake business is unlike anything I've ever been a part of (as far as the specifics go) and it's so nice to have people who are new or have done it forever to support you and give you pointers and their experiences. 

cupadeecakes Posted 30 Apr 2014 , 6:11pm
post #9 of 13

Quote:

Originally Posted by wickeddelish 
 

I agree,  I was going more drama-free than practical. 

 

I guess what both of you are saying makes a lot more sense. I'm not even thinking clearly. Getting this going is A LOT of hard work. I was expecting that though. My mind's just a little frazzled. Once I get all of these things out of the way, I'll be clear-headed again. Thanks so much for your help. 


It's not that you're not thinking clearly, it makes a lot of sense!   It's just that in practice it's not terribly feasible to execute.  I tried a "sign off" sheet when I first started and it didn't work out for me.  Keep your contracts flexible, especially at first.  My first contract was teeny, because I hated all that "legal-ese".  With each bad bride or near miss my contract grew until I finally realized why contracts were so big and thorough.

wickeddelish Posted 30 Apr 2014 , 6:22pm
post #10 of 13

Quote:

Originally Posted by cupadeecakes 
 


It's not that you're not thinking clearly, it makes a lot of sense!   It's just that in practice it's not terribly feasible to execute.  I tried a "sign off" sheet when I first started and it didn't work out for me.  Keep your contracts flexible, especially at first.  My first contract was teeny, because I hated all that "legal-ese".  With each bad bride or near miss my contract grew until I finally realized why contracts were so big and thorough.

It makes a lot of sense. Mine is actually chock-full of legalese (I work in law as my day job). It didn't start out that way but the more I kept thinking about things that could happen or go wrong, I kept adding to it. So it's certainly thorough. Maybe too thorough. After the feedback, I'm going to scrap the extra delivery contract. It'll also make things easier. Thanks!

-K8memphis Posted 2 May 2014 , 1:35pm
post #11 of 13

i have another thought for you regarding contracts-- my 'contract' is an order blank with a place for names & blabla and the cake details--it says cancelations must be in writing, what serving sizes are, when to pay what and that they are non-refundable/non-transferable, no changes to cake after sucha date, additional cake is in 25 portion increments, that i reserve the right to produce the cake to the best of my ability--ex--make executive decisions--get cake out of direct sunlight----we sign it -- tada

 

but it is short and sweet and all the catastrophies of life and cake i leave for another day--it's a when we come to that bridge type of thing for me --

 

just a thought for you (while the spam spasm rages on the other part of the board ;)

 

hope all is going well for your opening!

cai0311 Posted 2 May 2014 , 6:28pm
post #12 of 13

AAnother thought...

If you make wedding cakes, 99% of the time you don't see the bride when you deliver a cake. No venue is going to sign off on the cake. Even in the cake is perfect, the venue won't know what the bride ordered. So there is no way for them to sign off on the order.

wickeddelish Posted 2 May 2014 , 6:33pm
post #13 of 13

AThanks. I've done plenty of party cakes, but only 1 wedding (hoping that changes soon). I didn't think of that before I posted.

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