Dummy Cakes, Please Help!!!

Decorating By PinkSuga Updated 1 May 2014 , 10:30am by kkmcmahan

PinkSuga Posted 29 Apr 2014 , 1:20am
post #1 of 13

I want to make a dummy cake. What materials can i use to simulate buttercream and fondant???

12 replies
Rosie93095 Posted 29 Apr 2014 , 6:32pm
post #2 of 13

For buttercream you can make an American BC recipe but use the cheapest  Shortening, Confectioners Sugar and Water you can find no need to use butter or flavoring since no one is eating it

PinkSuga Posted 29 Apr 2014 , 7:46pm
post #3 of 13

AWill this harden???

PinkSuga Posted 29 Apr 2014 , 7:47pm
post #4 of 13

A

Original message sent by Rosie93095

For buttercream you can make an American BC recipe but use the cheapest  Shortening, Confectioners Sugar and Water you can find no need to use butter or flavoring since no one is eating it

Will this harden?

kkmcmahan Posted 29 Apr 2014 , 7:48pm
post #5 of 13

You can use royal icing.  It hardens nicely and will stay looking good for a long time.  Then you are ready to change your design, you can rinse it away under hot running water.  It is just sugar so it won't clog the drains like real buttercream...a plus!

AZCouture Posted 29 Apr 2014 , 8:31pm
post #6 of 13

AWhat are you making them for, just for practice? For an order for a client? Do they need to "keep" for awhile, or just until you photograph them?

PinkSuga Posted 29 Apr 2014 , 10:03pm
post #7 of 13

A

Original message sent by AZCouture

What are you making them for, just for practice? For an order for a client? Do they need to "keep" for awhile, or just until you photograph them?

I am making them for a cake expo I want to do the pulled dot and the rosette technique. I also want to be able to add color

PinkSuga Posted 30 Apr 2014 , 5:48pm
post #8 of 13

Yes I would like to keep them for a while

kkmcmahan Posted 30 Apr 2014 , 6:36pm
post #9 of 13

I covered dummy cakes (3 tier) in royal icing for a final project in the Wilton Master Class which I took in September of 2012.  I still have the cake, covered in a plastic dry cleaning bag to keep the dust off of it.  So I would say it holds up pretty good.  Just keep it away from mice and dust and it will keep for years.

Rosie93095 Posted 30 Apr 2014 , 7:01pm
post #10 of 13


No, but if you are keeping the dummy for a long time you can also use Royal icing instead

hbquikcomjamesl Posted 1 May 2014 , 12:15am
post #11 of 13

I keep shooting my mouth off about doing dummy cakes with Hydrocal for frosting, even though I've never needed a dummy cake, and the only things I've ever done with the stuff is build model train scenery (and patch the occasional hole in the wall, if that's the kind of plaster that was handy), but I seriously think that if vermin were to try and eat a cake frosted with it, they'd probably break off their teeth.

 

And no, before you ask, I do NOT have any connection to the U.S. Gypsum company.

PinkSuga Posted 1 May 2014 , 1:39am
post #12 of 13

A

Original message sent by kkmcmahan

I covered dummy cakes (3 tier) in royal icing for a final project in the Wilton Master Class which I took in September of 2012.  I still have the cake, covered in a plastic dry cleaning bag to keep the dust off of it.  So I would say it holds up pretty good.  Just keep it away from mice and dust and it will keep for years.

Will royal icing hold in a pulled dot and rosettes tecnique???

kkmcmahan Posted 1 May 2014 , 10:30am
post #13 of 13

Yes, ri will hold in any shape.  If it is too thick to pipe for what you are doing, add a little corn syrup until you get a consistency that is easier to work with.  The corn syrup adds a little elasticity to the ri and makes it easier to work (I do this when I am doing drop strings).  Just don't use too much or the ri will be too soft and can loose it's shape.

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