First Paid Cake...far From Perfect.

Decorating By lydthompson Updated 3 Jun 2014 , 8:04pm by maybenot

lydthompson Posted 28 Apr 2014 , 5:47pm
post #1 of 13

AThis was my first paid cake, I'm a hobby baker and I've only baked for family so far. It was 80 F here in Tennessee on Saturday and my American buttercream rosettes fell off my cake 4 times...just the front! It was an inside wedding with a/c so I'm guessing I just used too high amount of butter in my buttercream. I used: 1 cup Crisco 1 cup butter 2 lbs conf sugar 3 t. flavorings a little water

On top of that my cake bulged and cracked when I inserted my columns (already iced) and I found the touchup of my buttercream difficult..it did not want to crust. It was a tough day. Feedback welcome.

12 replies
lydthompson Posted 28 Apr 2014 , 6:15pm
post #2 of 13

A[IMG ALT="*"]http://cakecentral.com/content/type/61/id/3227365/width/350/height/700[/IMG]

I forgot to attach the image:

This was my first paid cake, I'm a hobby baker and I've only baked for family so far. It was 80 F here in Tennessee on Saturday and my American buttercream rosettes fell off my cake 4 times...just the front! It was an inside wedding with a/c so I'm guessing I just used too high amount of butter in my buttercream. I used: 1 cup Crisco 1 cup butter 2 lbs conf sugar 3 t. flavorings a little water

On top of that my cake bulged and cracked when I inserted my columns (already iced) and I found the touchup of my buttercream difficult..it did not want to crust. It was a tough day. Feedback welcome.

I

FioreCakes Posted 28 Apr 2014 , 6:28pm
post #3 of 13

When you transported it was it chilled? Did you have your AC on high in the car? Did you block the cake from direct sunlight in the car?  80degrees should be fine for that icing recipe as long as the cake is traveling and placed in environments that are not 80 degrees. 

 

What kind of columns did you use? SPS? Wilton? If your cake cracks and bulges…buttercream touch up is the least of your problems! you're lucky that whole cake didn't collapse! I would have rebaked the cake, personally. Maybe you need a denser cake recipe that can handle a support system being inserted?

 

I would practice a little more before you start charging. Running a cake business involves knowing how icing behaves in all sorts of weather, how to support a cake, etc. I only say this because you don't want to start charging too soon and get a bad reputation around town for your cake quality…or worse, get a very upset bride and be out the money you spent on the cake when she demands a refund. 

lydthompson Posted 28 Apr 2014 , 6:45pm
post #4 of 13

AFioreCakes...Thanks for the comments. I'm still a hobby baker. The friend who paid me had tasted my cake at my nieces wedding and insisted I do her daughter's wedding...she knew I was no professional. I'm sticking to family:)

I transported the cakes in the trunk when it was cooler in the day. Cake were at room temperature before. My cake is box/scratch WASC and has worked for me in the past. The columns I used were Wilton decorated roman columns which are squared at each end. I inserted them after right before setup...I wondered if I had used the round columns if I would have had the same problem.

I truly learn something every time I do a cake. I would use less butter in my buttercream next time.

FioreCakes Posted 28 Apr 2014 , 6:51pm
post #5 of 13

I don't want to discourage you from charging someday…I think the skill is there, just need to learn these little tricks to deliver a pristine cake.

 

I would advise against putting the cakes in the trunk in any sort of weather over 50 degrees, the trunk is always warmer than an air conditioned car. Also, if you chill your cakes before delivery, you will notice a night and day difference in their ability to travel flawlessly!

 

The cracking/bulging was definitely the columns…not the cake. This could also cause your rosettes to lose grip and fall off.  I use the WASC all the time and it is actually very sturdy. Those squares at the bottom of your columns were definitely the culprit. I would look into SPS…the columns are small and hollow so it displaces the cake minimally. 

 

I think if you do these things I suggested, you can keep your icing recipe just the way it is. 

lydthompson Posted 28 Apr 2014 , 7:06pm
post #6 of 13

AThanks again, FioreCakes. I used the decorative columns because I knew I would get a level cake and have room for the roses:) With the round columns I have to rely on cutting them all to the right length. I considered the SPS system at one time...I need to look at that again if I have a wedding cake in my future. I appreciate the tip on chilling the cakes!! One little tip like that really makes a difference:)

maybenot Posted 28 Apr 2014 , 8:07pm
post #7 of 13

My rule on cake in a car trunk:  NEVER, NEVER, NEVER

 

A car trunk is an OVEN--even in cold weather.  It's over the exhaust pipe [hot], sunlight beating down on the top is a passive heat source, air conditioning can't reach it, and there is no air circulation at all. 

 

Cakes need to be placed on a flat surface near the center of the vehicle, away from direct sunlight & heater vents [unless the air conditioning is on].

Dani1081 Posted 28 May 2014 , 1:56pm
post #8 of 13

Quote:

Originally Posted by FioreCakes 
 

I don't want to discourage you from charging someday…I think the skill is there, just need to learn these little tricks to deliver a pristine cake.

 

I would advise against putting the cakes in the trunk in any sort of weather over 50 degrees, the trunk is always warmer than an air conditioned car. Also, if you chill your cakes before delivery, you will notice a night and day difference in their ability to travel flawlessly!

 

The cracking/bulging was definitely the columns…not the cake. This could also cause your rosettes to lose grip and fall off.  I use the WASC all the time and it is actually very sturdy. Those squares at the bottom of your columns were definitely the culprit. I would look into SPS…the columns are small and hollow so it displaces the cake minimally. 

 

I think if you do these things I suggested, you can keep your icing recipe just the way it is. 

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ EVERYTHING she said!! Always transport a chilled cake and NEVER, EVER, EVER, EVER put a cake in the trunk of a car!!! ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

vervainangel Posted 28 May 2014 , 2:33pm
post #9 of 13

Adid you stick the real flowers directly into the cake?

cakebaby2 Posted 28 May 2014 , 3:02pm
post #10 of 13

Quote:

Originally Posted by vervainangel 

did you stick the real flowers directly into the cake?

Not sure about the topper but looks like one of those polystyrene stackers for the lower ones?

louanne Posted 29 May 2014 , 8:15pm
post #11 of 13

ASomething you need to remember about columns, they are NOT inserted into the cake.

Looking at your puncture it looks as if you used the columns to separate your cakes, not as support.

Yes if you are using Sps as support yes those get inserted, but not to separate tiers. They make the plates that go in top and base of cakes that the columns attach to, (as well as still needing you inside cake supports).

But if you are doing a stacked cake and needing support, use the round Sps columns, inserting the square base into your cake is definitely what caused the buckling.

cai0311 Posted 3 Jun 2014 , 5:40pm
post #12 of 13

A

Quote:
Originally Posted by maybenot 

My rule on cake in a car trunk:  NEVER, NEVER, NEVER

 

A car trunk is an OVEN--even in cold weather.  It's over the exhaust pipe [hot], sunlight beating down on the top is a passive heat source, air conditioning can't reach it, and there is no air circulation at all. 

 

Cakes need to be placed on a flat surface near the center of the vehicle, away from direct sunlight & heater vents [unless the air conditioning is on].

 

I know this post is over a month old, but I had to comment on the above post.

I delivered hundereds of cakes - most of them wedding cakes - in the trunk of my tiny Suzuki car. I just put the back seats down so the air conditioner blasted cold air into the trunk. I also chilled all my cakes overnight before delivery so they were cool when I put them in the trunk.

I have yet to lose a cake.

maybenot Posted 3 Jun 2014 , 8:04pm
post #13 of 13

AWell, I was, of course, referring to an ENCLOSED trunk where there is no A/C or circulating air.

What you describe is tantamount to the back of an SUV or minivan-- l'ved used both for transport--and they're great.

Not every car allows for the option you describe.

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