Ganache On A Cake

Decorating By nikki54321 Updated 4 May 2014 , 11:55pm by enga

nikki54321 Posted 22 Apr 2014 , 7:47am
post #1 of 31

hi everyone

i have a few questions about using ganache to fill and crumb coat a cake before covering with fondant. i have always used buttercream on/in my cakes because i suppose im afraid of ganache. 

do i need to store a ganache filled/bc cake in the fridge? (thinking the cream will go off)

how long does the ganache last for outside the fridge? 

what chocolate should i use to make ganache?

do people use ganache on a plain vanilla cake and if so what chocolate do u use?

how do people get coloured ganache? (is it just food colouring paste same as bc)

 

i know there is a lot of questions but this is why i havent used and scared of using ganache any answers to my questions will be so helpful 

thanks

30 replies
CMLayton Posted 25 Apr 2014 , 3:53pm
post #2 of 31

AI can answer a few questions for you! Ganache does not need refrigeration once it is made. Most people mix it up and let it sit overnight to get a good spreadable consistency. I use Ghirardelli chocolate for mine. The better the quality chocolate, the better the taste of the ganache. I think ganache goes well on any flavor! Hopefully someone else can chime in on the other question about coloring. :)

enga Posted 25 Apr 2014 , 4:08pm
post #3 of 31

Hi nikki54321, I'm going to give it a go this weekend and I'm going to use Ghirardelli chocolate like CMLayton.

 

Using this technique by Michelle whom I love, love, love. Don't know much about coloring accept you need to use a special kind for chocolate or it will seize up on you, Maybe cocoa butter based, I'll have to check back on what we used in school.

 


kellyk1234 Posted 25 Apr 2014 , 7:30pm
post #4 of 31

I've never seen or heard of colored ganache but that's not to say it can't be done. Most people cover ganache cakes with fondant, which can easily be colored and decorated as desired. For vanilla cake white chocolate ganache is good. I use Ghirardelli too or Bakers brand chocolate. Just make sure the white (and dark) chocolate has cocoa butter in the ingredients list. The candy melts or chocolate chips do not have cocoa butter in it (unless it's dark chocolate, but I haven't had success with using chips.)

 

Also, make sure you use a good quality, high fat heavy cream with at least 35% milk fat.

 

Michele's youtube video is great that someone else suggested, and this video is also very helpful.

http://www.threelittleblackbirds.com/2012/10/simply-ganache-a-tutorial/

 

I combine the techniques used in both videos. I like microwaving my chocolate and heavy cream together like in Michele's video, but I like to make my ganache in the morning to cover a cake with in the afternoon that way I don't have to worry about it being too hard after sitting overnight, and then reheating, stiring, over heating, letting cool again, etc.

 

Don't be afraid! It's only cake (at least that's what I try to tell myself when something goes wrong!)

Just practice a few times and you'll get it!

enga Posted 25 Apr 2014 , 8:45pm
post #5 of 31

I have seen some of the tutorials from TLB, I didn't realize she had one for ganache. I like the am/pm idea.

 

pssssst...... is it me or did she look REALLY uncomfortable when her husband cut the cake? 0_0

kellyk1234 Posted 25 Apr 2014 , 9:03pm
post #6 of 31

AHer ganache video made me confident enough to try my first ganache covered cake! She explains everything so well! I don't think I could ever frost/ganache a cake the traditional way anymore with straight sides, I always use the upside down method!

And maybe she was nervous about cutting into that beautiful cake! Haha! She did day that's why her husband cuts her cakes!

enga Posted 25 Apr 2014 , 9:15pm
post #7 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by kellyk1234 

Her ganache video made me confident enough to try my first ganache covered cake! She explains everything so well! I don't think I could ever frost/ganache a cake the traditional way anymore with straight sides, I always use the upside down method!

And maybe she was nervous about cutting into that beautiful cake! Haha! She did day that's why her husband cuts her cakes!

I have heard a few other people say they love the upside down version of ganaching (I think that's a word) a cake, Thanks for the link now I don't know which one to try first.

 

I don't know why her expression made me think of a Mr. Bill parody :-P 

nikki54321 Posted 25 Apr 2014 , 9:46pm
post #8 of 31

AWow thanks everyone for your comments and help I am gonna give it a go so I'll let u all know how I get on thanks again

kellyk1234 Posted 25 Apr 2014 , 10:43pm
post #9 of 31

Quote:

Originally Posted by enga 
 

I have heard a few other people say they love the upside down version of ganaching (I think that's a word) a cake, Thanks for the link now I don't know which one to try first.

 

I don't know why her expression made me think of a Mr. Bill parody :-P 

I tried the upside down method using cream cheese frosting too (just once.) I haven't really been using anything other than ganache because it's so much easier to work with than buttercream (IMO) and laying fondant on top. Just wish it wasn't so darn expensive to make!

kellyk1234 Posted 25 Apr 2014 , 10:44pm
post #10 of 31

Quote:

Originally Posted by nikki54321 

Wow thanks everyone for your comments and help I am gonna give it a go so I'll let u all know how I get on thanks again

Good luck! :) 

enga Posted 25 Apr 2014 , 10:58pm
post #11 of 31
Quote:

Originally Posted by kellyk1234 

 

I tried the upside down method using cream cheese frosting too (just once.) I haven't really been using anything other than ganache because it's so much easier to work with than buttercream (IMO) and laying fondant on top. Just wish it wasn't so darn expensive to make!

That's what I have been working on kelly. I usually only make SMBC cakes. I have been working with SA fondant and I don't like the taste but I do like it's workabilty. I wanted to make it from scratch but it's very time consuming. All the other fondants that are said to taste good are super expensive. I figured I would give ganache a try.

 

I do love the look of just a ganache finished cake without the fondant like in TLB video but I need to be able to paint on  them. Sigh.....

kellyk1234 Posted 26 Apr 2014 , 12:25pm
post #12 of 31

AThat's what I have been working on kelly. I usually only make SMBC cakes. I have been working with SA fondant and I don't like the taste but I do like it's workabilty. I wanted to make it from scratch but it's very time consuming. All the other fondants that are said to taste good are super expensive. I figured I would give ganache a try.

I do love the look of just a ganache finished cake without the fondant like in TLB video but I need to be able to paint on  them. Sigh..... [/quote]

I've always made my own MMF and it's so easy to make, I don't like how to have to let it "rest" for a day though. BUT I just starting making Liz Mareks, from Artisan Cake company, marshmallow fondant and it's pretty amazing. She kneads Wilton fondant in, so it has the same nice pliability to it, but tastes like regular MMF. And it's still cheap to make if you use a coupon at the hobby stores to buy the Wilton fondant to add in. It's also ready to use right after making it. Check out the video, in the end the lifts the whole thing of fondant up with her hands to put on a dummy cake without any rips or tears.

http://artisancakecompany.com/2012/11/the-best-marshmallow-fondant-recipe-ever/

LizzieAylett Posted 26 Apr 2014 , 3:11pm
post #13 of 31

Quote:

Originally Posted by enga 

 

I do love the look of just a ganache finished cake without the fondant like in TLB video but I need to be able to paint on  them. Sigh.....

 

You can paint on ganache using melted cocoa butter coloured with powder colours.  Obviously you need to be careful not to have your cocoa butter too hot or it will melt the ganache, but it is possible.  Just mix white powder into the melted cocoa butter to make it opaque, and then whatever colours you want.

enga Posted 26 Apr 2014 , 3:36pm
post #14 of 31
Quote:

I've always made my own MMF and it's so easy to make, I don't like how to have to let it "rest" for a day though. BUT I just starting making Liz Mareks, from Artisan Cake company, marshmallow fondant and it's pretty amazing. She kneads Wilton fondant in, so it has the same nice pliability to it, but tastes like regular MMF. And it's still cheap to make if you use a coupon at the hobby stores to buy the Wilton fondant to add in. It's also ready to use right after making it. Check out the video, in the end the lifts the whole thing of fondant up with her hands to put on a dummy cake without any rips or tears.

http://artisancakecompany.com/2012/11/the-best-marshmallow-fondant-recipe-ever/

Thank you Kelly I will definitely try the recipe. I have left over SA from my commercial kitchen, can I use that with the recipe? I want to buy the mat also. I think I'll stop at Home Depot and pick up some PVC pipe too.

enga Posted 26 Apr 2014 , 3:44pm
post #15 of 31

Quote:

Originally Posted by LizzieAylett 
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by enga 

 

I do love the look of just a ganache finished cake without the fondant like in TLB video but I need to be able to paint on  them. Sigh.....

 

You can paint on ganache using melted cocoa butter coloured with powder colours.  Obviously you need to be careful not to have your cocoa butter too hot or it will melt the ganache, but it is possible.  Just mix white powder into the melted cocoa butter to make it opaque, and then whatever colours you want.

We used that technique in school to paint the chocolate forms for chocolate making, (palm meets forehead), thanks for reminding me LizzieAylett, lol. Guess I should try and find some powdered colors and cocoa butter to experiment. I'll post pics to let you and Kelly see how things went.

 

Thank you both again for all your help ;-D

kellyk1234 Posted 26 Apr 2014 , 4:00pm
post #16 of 31

AWhat is SA fondant? I'm sure you can use any fondant. I've been wanting to get the Mat too, just not sure whether to get the home or pro mat.

enga Posted 26 Apr 2014 , 4:35pm
post #17 of 31

Quote:

Originally Posted by kellyk1234 

What is SA fondant? I'm sure you can use any fondant. I've been wanting to get the Mat too, just not sure whether to get the home or pro mat.
 
 

Satin Ice, sorry. I just watched the video, her fondant looks divine! I don't think you will even need the mat but I still want one:lol:. I was thinking about getting the pro.

 

I wanted the PVC pipe because Ron Ben Israel make it look so easy to roll out fondant with it. I don't like the big Wilton one I have, it doesn't feel right in my hands.

 

One more quick question, what is modeling chocolate used for? I keep hearing about it, I don't know if you use it for making figures, to cover a cake or what.

enga Posted 26 Apr 2014 , 4:59pm
post #18 of 31

Well Nicki54321, I'm going to take the plunge and give it a go. I like you, am afraid of ganache AND fondant, so sorry to have high jacked your thread :oops:. Please forgive me.

 

Wish you luck with yours too.

kellyk1234 Posted 26 Apr 2014 , 5:35pm
post #19 of 31

Quote:

Originally Posted by enga 
 

Satin Ice, sorry. I just watched the video, her fondant looks divine! I don't think you will even need the mat but I still want one:lol:. I was thinking about getting the pro.

 

I wanted the PVC pipe because Ron Ben Israel make it look so easy to roll out fondant with it. I don't like the big Wilton one I have, it doesn't feel right in my hands.

 

One more quick question, what is modeling chocolate used for? I keep hearing about it, I don't know if you use it for making figures, to cover a cake or what.

I've heard of a lot of people using PVC too and love it. The Wilton rolling pin is OK, but I'd still rather use a silicone rolling pin with the handles. I don't have one, but that's just another thing on my wishlist! :roll:

 

You can ALMOST use modeling chocolate in replace of fondant completely! I love it, I haven't covered an entire cake with it but I like to use it for decorations on the fondant (like stripes and lettering). You can't drape modeling chocolate the traditional way like with fondant, but you can panel wrap a cake with it, and can make the seams pretty much invisible by just rubbing with your fingers. The warmth of your fingers softens it enough to mend back together. You also don't have to worry about it drying out. If it's too hard to work with then you simply heat it in the microwave for a few seconds, or if its too soft you can stick in the fridge for a few minutes. 

 

I've only used candy melts so far when making modeling chocolate and I color it with regular gel food coloring. I'm not sure though if you use real chocolate if you have to use the candy coloring.

 

Here are a few links that I think you may find helpful though. :)

 

http://jessicakesblog.blogspot.com/2012/04/how-to-make-modeling-chocolate.html

 

http://jessicakesblog.blogspot.com/2013/05/modeling-chocolate-questions-answered.html

 

http://www.wickedgoodies.net/2013/09/how-to-make-modeling-chocolate-video/

enga Posted 26 Apr 2014 , 5:59pm
post #20 of 31

Kelly thank you soooo much! I have the XOXO silicone covered rolling pin with the handles (works like a dream) but for covering larger cakes I always get lines. Wish I had one that was as long as the Wilton one:roll:

kellyk1234 Posted 26 Apr 2014 , 7:12pm
post #21 of 31

AYou're welcome Enga! And I didn't think about it having lines. But I do always make sure the side of fondant that's against the counter is the outer part of the cake, that way it's super smooth. So maybe little lines won't be an issue. In the video on Sweetwises website, she used a silicone rolling pin with the Mat.

enga Posted 4 May 2014 , 12:12am
post #22 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by nikki54321 

Wow thanks everyone for your comments and help I am gonna give it a go so I'll let u all know how I get on thanks again

Hi nikki54321, did you try it yet? I made the ganache sort of like Michelle's except I slowly heated up my cream first which was frozen. I added it to the chocolate, then I put in the microwave in 1 minute intervals because I didn't want to take any chances on burning it. This is how it turned out so far. I don't know if I should let it sit out overnight or let it cool and put it in the fridge. I planning on putting on the cake tomorrow. I'll keep you posted ;-D 

enga Posted 4 May 2014 , 12:41am
post #23 of 31

Ooops, I guess a pic would help!

 

 

morganchampagne Posted 4 May 2014 , 7:29am
post #24 of 31

AThis isn't directed to you, OP. But what is so scary about putting ganache on a cake exactly? I've seen people lately say "I'm afraid to do it"....it's just another type of icing for lack of a better term. Where does the fear come in?

MBalaska Posted 4 May 2014 , 8:19am
post #25 of 31

OP, I'm with morganchampagne on this one.  Chocolate ganache is just icing.

here's an interesting website

http://thestoryofchocolate.com/What/ingredients.cfm?ItemNumber=3305

 

maybe if someone said it like this: the ingredients in ganache are--

chocolate LIQUOR

cocoa BUTTER

SUGAR

LECITHIN

VANILLA flavoring

CREAM

 

You'd think that it's a nice recipe for frosting.

cazza1 Posted 4 May 2014 , 8:45am
post #26 of 31

I think ganache is easier to work with than icing, especially when  the fondant goes over the top as it is so sturdy.

enga Posted 4 May 2014 , 11:11pm
post #27 of 31

Quote:

Originally Posted by morganchampagne 

This isn't directed to you, OP. But what is so scary about putting ganache on a cake exactly? I've seen people lately say "I'm afraid to do it"....it's just another type of icing for lack of a better term. Where does the fear come in?

So was it directed at me? If it is, it's because of the fear of wasting very expensive ingredients if it doesn't come out right. There are so many variations of ganache, what ratios work best,  what you can add and what you cant. I just want to get it right before investing in it as a product line.

mattyeatscakes Posted 4 May 2014 , 11:28pm
post #28 of 31

AI'm with enga on this one! I've never used ganache because:

A. I am scared to try it. Lol.. Dunno why, but i really am scared. (Coward) B. ingredients are expensive, so if i fail that's expensive chocolate down the drain C. True. There are so many ratios on chocolate and cream out there and i don't know which one to use. Is there an absolutely no-fail ganache recipe out there for a beginner like me? Hehehe

But that doesn't mean i'll never try it. Eventually i will :) i'll soon have to venture to the world of modeling chocolate and ganache someday :) baby steps!

morganchampagne Posted 4 May 2014 , 11:31pm
post #29 of 31

A

Original message sent by enga

So was it directed at me? If it is, it's because of the fear of wasting very expensive ingredients if it doesn't come out right. There are so many variations of ganache, what ratios work best,  what you can add and what you cant. I just want to get it right before investing in it as a product line.

Oh no. I didn't even read all the responses...I was just commenting on other stuff I've seen here lately. Nothing specific to this thread

morganchampagne Posted 4 May 2014 , 11:37pm
post #30 of 31

AI promise you guys it's not hard! Best thing to do is investigate the ratios and not be bound to any ratio

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