New Wilton Decorator Preferred Fondant

Decorating By acakes215 Updated 26 Mar 2015 , 2:41pm by Michelle46

acakes215 Posted 15 Apr 2014 , 6:40pm
post #1 of 55

AHas anyone tried the new Wilton Decorator Preferred Fondant? The one in the purple/white box? If so, how does it taste? It claims to be easier to work with, smells, and taste better. I wonder how is compares to Satin Ice.

54 replies
morganchampagne Posted 15 Apr 2014 , 8:28pm
post #2 of 55

AHaven't tried it. Heard that in trying to improve it they lost most of what people liked about it. Apparently sticky and stretchy.

AZCouture Posted 15 Apr 2014 , 8:32pm
post #3 of 55

ASticky and stretchy, you nailed it!

lcubed83 Posted 15 Apr 2014 , 8:37pm
post #4 of 55

We did a side-by-side taste test last night of the new Wilton and Satin Ice (from Hobby Lobby.)  We did not prefer the Wilton. My husband said it got "slimey" in his mouth.  (I am trying to choose for my niece's wedding.)

 

I haven't tried rolling them yet to see how they compare.

 

I too look forward to hearing other's thoughts.

morganchampagne Posted 15 Apr 2014 , 8:59pm
post #5 of 55

AAre you really experienced with fondant? If not you will not like satin Ice. It starts getting elephant skin and drying out and tearing fairly fast. You have to work really fast.

Although I read once if you really knead it...for about 5 minutes continuously that does help

acakes215 Posted 15 Apr 2014 , 9:32pm
post #6 of 55

AI'm experienced with fondant and I like to use Satin Ice. You do have to knead it awhile before use. I aldo use The Mat when rolling it out to help prevent drying.

acakes215 Posted 15 Apr 2014 , 9:33pm
post #7 of 55

A

Original message sent by morganchampagne

Are you really experienced with fondant? If not you will not like satin Ice. It starts getting elephant skin and drying out and tearing fairly fast. You have to work really fast.

Although I read once if you really knead it...for about 5 minutes continuously that does help

lcubed83 Posted 16 Apr 2014 , 2:40am
post #8 of 55

Thanks for the tip on kneading the SI.  I am not an expert with fondant, and have never used SI.  I have to cover three tiers, transport them 10 hours, finish decorating, then set up at an outdoor wedding reception.  I will be using ganache under for stability.  This is for family, but I want it to be as good as it can be!

Inga1 Posted 16 Apr 2014 , 3:00am
post #9 of 55

Tried the Wilton new fondant today in the Wilton class. Tastes like MMF. Will have to try it on a cake. Flavor is very good

acakes215 Posted 16 Apr 2014 , 3:54am
post #10 of 55

A

Original message sent by lcubed83

Thanks for the tip on kneading the SI.  I am not an expert with fondant, and have never used SI.  I have to cover three tiers, transport them 10 hours, finish decorating, then set up at an outdoor wedding reception.  I will be using ganache under for stability.  This is for family, but I want it to be as good as it can be!

acakes215 Posted 16 Apr 2014 , 3:54am
post #11 of 55

APlease do share pictures when you finish :)

acakes215 Posted 16 Apr 2014 , 3:55am
post #12 of 55

A

Original message sent by Inga1

Tried the Wilton new fondant today in the Wilton class. Tastes like MMF. Will have to try it on a cake. Flavor is very good

Was is similar to Satin Ice fondant?

AvaDoodles Posted 16 Apr 2014 , 3:43pm
post #13 of 55

I've made 3 cakes so far with the New Wilton Decorator Preferred Fondant  It tastes WAY better and is easy to roll, however more than half of what I use the old fondant was for fondant figures etc and this fondant does NOT set.  I even cut it 50/50 with Wilton gumpaste and the little pumpkins I made didnt set  at all even after 3 hours!

 

Does anyone know if adding tylose powder would work? 

 

Thank you!

Amanda

howsweet Posted 16 Apr 2014 , 3:56pm
post #14 of 55

A

Original message sent by morganchampagne

Are you really experienced with fondant? If not you will not like satin Ice. It starts getting elephant skin and drying out and tearing fairly fast. You have to work really fast.

Although I read once if you really knead it...for about 5 minutes continuously that does help

I used Satin Ice for years and if you over knead it, it practically ruins it. If you add glucose after that, it helps. I saw a demonstration at a bakery convention where this lady was rerolling the same ball of Satin Ice over and over, each time rolling more p sugar into it. It did stay workable for her, but what she was doing was nothing like what anyone would do in real practice.

howsweet Posted 16 Apr 2014 , 3:59pm
post #15 of 55

AAlso how any fondant performs for you will be effected by the humidity on the day you're using it. So what works well in Arizona may not in the south of Florida.

JackiSto Posted 16 Apr 2014 , 4:38pm
post #16 of 55

I use satin ice exclusively. I ran out of black and had to grab Wilton in a pinch at Michael's and have to say, I was DREADING IT! When I opened the package, it was actually pliable, and I was able to use it to blend in with the Satin Ice with no problem. It still tastes like crap, and I would NOT cover a whole cake in it, but for decorations and color blending, this stuff is FAR superior to what it used to be.

 

As for the issues people seem to be having with over kneading the satin ice, I have found that when it warms up, it does in fact get terribly difficult to work with, but dusting your hands with corn starch and kneading it more will firm it up nicely. You can always pop it into the fridge for a few minutes if necessary as well. Satin ice rarely sweats unless you've added too much shortening. Another tip for satin Ice is to use The Mat. I love this thing... it's very simple, but a god sent. You don't have to cover your entire kitchen in powdered sugar or corn starch, and not doing that helps the satin ice retain it's beautiful sheen. I hope that helps someone! Good luck and let us know what you decide to do! :)

morganchampagne Posted 16 Apr 2014 , 6:27pm
post #17 of 55

AHmm. I really like stain Ice when it comes to using it in molds. It releases so much easier. Pretty good for accents. I just find I'm not fast enough for satin ice. It' starts cracking and everything

JackiSto Posted 16 Apr 2014 , 6:30pm
post #18 of 55

Quote:

Originally Posted by acakes215 

I'm experienced with fondant and I like to use Satin Ice. You do have to knead it awhile before use. I aldo use The Mat when rolling it out to help prevent drying.

I DIDN'T SEE THIS WHEN I POSTED MY COMMENT! 100% AGREE!

Inga1 Posted 16 Apr 2014 , 8:07pm
post #19 of 55

I haven't had a chance to try Satin Ice. I mostly use Buttercream

acakes215 Posted 16 Apr 2014 , 8:09pm
post #20 of 55

A

Quote:
Originally Posted by Inga1 

I haven't had a chance to try Satin Ice. I mostly use Buttercream

 

I still have trouble getting the butter cream to be super smooth. I have seen people use butter cream and it looks like fondant. Any pointers?

acakedecorator Posted 16 Apr 2014 , 8:22pm
post #21 of 55

Quote:

Originally Posted by acakes215 

 

I still have trouble getting the butter cream to be super smooth. I have seen people use butter cream and it looks like fondant. Any pointers?

 

There are many, many ways to do it, but this is what I like to do:

I like to use the "take away" method. Put way more buttercream than you will need on the cake. Then start going around the cake with a tool with a straight edge (spackling knife, cake lifter, etc.) scraping off buttercream in long strokes. Hold the tool still and rotate the turn table. Keep going until it is smooth. Let it crust and then fix any imperfections with a Viva paper towel.

JackiSto Posted 16 Apr 2014 , 9:40pm
post #22 of 55

AGetting your buttercream nice and cold will help a lot ad well... makes all that scraping more effective :)

lcubed83 Posted 17 Apr 2014 , 1:32am
post #23 of 55

Well, I'll have to keep everything crossed and not overknead....I have a big bucket on the way from GSA!!  I also got a small blue to mix with the white for a sky blue.

 

Now to get cracking on gumpaste cherry blossoms!  And 150 or so decorated cookies for the wedding and  two trays of cookies for other events before the wedding...

Inga1 Posted 17 Apr 2014 , 8:33pm
post #24 of 55

I make a buttercream with 50%butter 50% shortening. Also put in some meringue powder. It crusts and then I smooth with a papertowel

acakes215 Posted 18 Apr 2014 , 5:12am
post #25 of 55

AI tend to get a lot of air bubbles. I only use shortening since people that request for wedding cakes wants the cake white. I tried to do the take away method but it still isn't 100% smooth when I do it. I also tried smoothing with a viva paper towel or parchment paper but still get dents.when i smooth it over and over I get small wrinkles.

JackiSto Posted 2 May 2014 , 2:57pm
post #26 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by acakes215 

I tend to get a lot of air bubbles. I only use shortening since people that request for wedding cakes wants the cake white. I tried to do the take away method but it still isn't 100% smooth when I do it. I also tried smoothing with a viva paper towel or parchment paper but still get dents.when i smooth it over and over I get small wrinkles.

with a 100% shortening frosting, it's very difficult to get it 100% smooth, because it stays completely malleable and barely crusts, if at all. You won't be able to do the upside down method because your icing won't get hard. If you would like to use butter and still get a white icing, you can find white butter out there... and it does mean you will be doing some trial and error... or you can get white coloring powder... which really does brighten up the white in icing... I have used it for wedding cakes, and it's very helpful. Also, I find that the paper towel method can be hit or miss, sometimes leaving a bit of lint... which is devastating. Try smoothing with a piece of parchment when the icing had COMPLETELY crusted instead. If there is moisture on the surface, it will wrinkle the paper, and cause wrinkles on your cake. As Inga said, meringue powder can help it crust a bit too! :)

MariaLovesCakes Posted 2 May 2014 , 4:35pm
post #27 of 55

Hello, ladies!  I opened up another thread about this topic too and saw yours so I wanted to post my findings with the new Wilton fondant just in case it helps you too.  I've always used the Wilton Fondant because it is so nice and thick and a dream to work with.  It is also perfect for bows and other sculpting. Granted its NOT the best tasting one, but it covers beautifully.  

 

Anyway, new fondant.  My friend had a horrible experience with it.  I tried it and following a bit of advice from someone who had success, also gave me success. 

 

Here's my comments that wrote on the other thread:  I am also giving you the link so that you can see the pics of the work the other ladies did and were successful/not successful.  Here's the link to that thread: http://cakecentral.com/t/774052/new-wilton-fondant-is-on-sale/15#post_7510975

 

My comments:

 

Well, ladies.. I finally got to "play" with the new Wilton fondant.  I just saw another thread where someone else was having issues with it.  I will go visit there too and leave my comments.

 

I have to say that I liked it.  I just takes some getting used to it and modifying some things you could do with the other fondant that you cannot do with this one.  

 

I will summarize it in a list:

 

New Fondant Wilton (My observations)

 

1.  Make sure you cover cake very well with buttercream.  This new fondant is very soft and will show any imperfections underneath.  I will try to roll it thicker next time.  But being that it is soft, it will "cling" to the cake more and show any imperfections underneath.

 

2.  I didn't use Crisco like with the older fondant to knead it.  I actually just kneaded it on top of The Mat, which I use to roll it out, and it worked beautifully. 

 

3.  It took color very nicely, but make sure that you use powdered sugar like you would any other fondant.  It gets very sticky.

 

4.  It took me a little longer the cake because it is soft. Be very careful.  Its soft and it will dent easily.

 

That's about it.  So in summary:

 

1. Roll thicker

2.  Don't use Crisco when kneading

3. Cover cake well with buttercream ( I am used to using a very thin coat of buttercream underneath)

 

I hope this helps those working with it.  I will copy this and paste it on the other board.

 

Thank you so much for sharing your findings and pictures with me ladies.  It really helped me in my experience using it.

 

Here's a pic of the cake I did.  I used the dots to cover the imperfections showing through the fondant.  :)

karankws Posted 18 May 2014 , 3:04am
post #28 of 55

AI used the new Wilton fondant today. I hardly ever cover a cake in fondant. I use it mainly for molding decorations. For small objects it was ok. But for larger things that really need to get hard it does not work. It NEVER gets hard. I was making a little mermaid and could never get her body to firm up. And some long tall seaweed stalks would not firm up so I could stick them in the top of the cake. So I am very disappointed. Worst thing is Wilton does not give you the choice which one to buy. I would use the new one to cover cakes. But not my molded art work. I spend hours on some of the things I do. Very disappointed.

AvaDoodles Posted 19 May 2014 , 1:38pm
post #29 of 55

I had previously posted how much trouble I was having with the new Wilton Fondant, I found that adding a few tsp of the Witlon Gum-Tex works wonders!  Almost like the old fondant when it comes to making figures etc.  Hope this helps others too!

 

Amanda

karankws Posted 19 May 2014 , 2:11pm
post #30 of 55

THANK YOU AMANDA, I will try that. I ended up having to use a real Ariel doll, but it ended up being ok. But still disappointed I could not make her instead.

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