Icing Falls Off Side Of Cake

Decorating By dugan625 Updated 15 Apr 2014 , 5:23am by oftheeicing

dugan625 Posted 14 Apr 2014 , 6:44pm
post #1 of 13

I did a Brobee (Yo Gabba Gabba) cake this weekend.  I made my own buttercream icing.  The "fur", made with the grass tip, would not stay on the side of the cake. It kept falling off. This weekend I want to make a basketweave around the sides, but I'm afraid the same thing will happen.  Is it icing consistency? 

 

What guidelines do I follow to ensure the sides of my cake come out as well as the top? 

12 replies
bigdad Posted 14 Apr 2014 , 6:55pm
post #2 of 13

did you dirty ice it first?

dugan625 Posted 14 Apr 2014 , 6:57pm
post #3 of 13

Yes I did with the same butter cream. 

bigdad Posted 14 Apr 2014 , 7:01pm
post #4 of 13

Maybe it is a little to dry not sure> Hope someone else will give an answer. good luck  just make you some icing and try difff. things.

ScarletBaker Posted 14 Apr 2014 , 7:24pm
post #5 of 13

AI also think your crumb coating has dried out, you could dampen it down with a little boiled water

mermaidcakery Posted 14 Apr 2014 , 10:31pm
post #6 of 13

AI notice when my icing is too stiff, it doesn't stick when I use the grass tip. Try thinning it out a little at a time until it sticks, but still holds the shape

dugan625 Posted 14 Apr 2014 , 11:24pm
post #7 of 13

AThanks everyone. I'm giving it another try this weekend.

DeniseNH Posted 14 Apr 2014 , 11:34pm
post #8 of 13

Your hands may be heating up the icing in the bag.  Keep a frozen bag of (whatever) next to you and every once in a while place your hand on the frozen bag to cool it down.  The crumb coating should be softer than the fur.

denetteb Posted 14 Apr 2014 , 11:44pm
post #9 of 13

And you need to kind of gently push the icing into the crumb coat to start and then keep putting pressure on the bag as you move the tip away. 

Kaykaymay Posted 14 Apr 2014 , 11:51pm
post #10 of 13

Did you carve the cake? or did you use a dome shaped pan?

 

For me I've had problems when I removed the outer crust of the cake and my icing is in direct contact with the inside of the cake.

 

I dont know why but it never works for me

dugan625 Posted 15 Apr 2014 , 1:14am
post #11 of 13

Denise - Frozen icing brings up an entirely different issue.  Either I'm a weakling or I have arthritic hands, but either way, I cannot pipe very cold icing.  I cannot get it to come out of the bag!

 

I did carve the cake just a little bit, but not much.  I've been decorating easy cakes for 30 years for family only.  Now I've decided to get up to speed on the new techniques and make it a side job. There is a lot to learn since I took a class at 18 y.o.!     

Kaykaymay Posted 15 Apr 2014 , 4:05am
post #12 of 13

Quote:

Originally Posted by dugan625 
 

Denise - Frozen icing brings up an entirely different issue.  Either I'm a weakling or I have arthritic hands, but either way, I cannot pipe very cold icing.  I cannot get it to come out of the bag!

 

I don't think she meant that you should freeze the icing but sometimes when you hold the piping bag your own body heat causes the icing to warm up too much and kinda melt a little. To help prevent this problem you can keep a bag of frozen peas for example (or anything you have in your freezer) close by and grab on to it for a while to keep your hands cool in between piping. However I don't think that's your problem bcuz when that happens the icing doesn't hold its shape when piped. Your fur looks intact.

 

I did carve the cake just a little bit, but not much.  I've been decorating easy cakes for 30 years for family only.  Now I've decided to get up to speed on the new techniques and make it a side job. There is a lot to learn since I took a class at 18 y.o.!

 

Nothing wrong with that, most of us are still learning even the pros. I dont think I'll ever know all there is to know about cake but I get a little better with every one I do.

 

Maybe if you try freezing your cake a little after carving that might help the icing stay on but honestly I don't know.    

oftheeicing Posted 15 Apr 2014 , 5:23am
post #13 of 13

AIf it is a consistency issue,from experience, I have found that too thin of an icing will literally slide off of the cake. Too thick, and you will get fur that just doesn't flow. agree 100% with denettdeb's advice, and maybe practice with the consistency of icing you are using on the side of a cake pan until you find what works best for you.

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%