I Can Not Make Ganache For The Life Of Me!

Decorating By luvmykids2bits Updated 14 Apr 2014 , 10:24pm by AZCouture

luvmykids2bits Posted 12 Apr 2014 , 2:20am
post #1 of 11

I've made it successfully once, before I started cake decorating, of course when it didn't matter.  Now, no matter what I do, I can not get it to be the right consistency for icing a cake!  I've watched tutorials, I've tried different rations of chocolate to cream, I've let it sit at room temperature and in the fridge, I've whipped it, and each time it ends up too thin or too sticky (today's batch just pulled chunks of cake off when I tried to spread).  I used dark chocolate wafers, two cups chocolate to one cup cream.  What am I doing wrong?

10 replies
deb4cakes2 Posted 12 Apr 2014 , 2:51am
post #2 of 11

Hi

The ratio I always use for Ganache is 375 grams (or just over 13oz) to 3/4 cup of cream.  This is for Milk or Dark Choc and for White Choc I use the same Chocolate measure and 1/2 cup of cream.  This usually sets up quite hard and if it's too hard to use on your cake (like pulling chunks of cake off, sounds too hard to use) just heat it up a bit until spreadable.  Hope this helps.

luvmykids2bits Posted 12 Apr 2014 , 3:08am
post #3 of 11

What consistency is it supposed to be?  Today's batch turned out very sticky, kind of like fudge sauce that you'd use on ice cream.  I've had a fluffier consistency before (like a thin buttercream) that spread beautifully but then sagged to the bottom of the cake when I put on the fondant, and then turned the fondant soft and soggy and the fondant ripped.  Do you whip it after it sets up?

Faradaye Posted 12 Apr 2014 , 3:48am
post #4 of 11

I don't whip the ganache if I'm putting on as a crumb coat under fondant.

 

The ratio for dark chocolate is 2 parts chocolate to 1 part heavy cream (at least 35% fat).  For milk chocolate or white chocolate, it's three parts chocolate to 1 part heavy cream.

 

The ratio is a guide, you might have to make some adjustments with the actual chocolate you are using.

 

If it is pulling chunks off your cake when you are trying to spread it, then it is too firm to apply, but will set nice and firm once it's on the cake, which you want.  You can soften it to a more spreadable texture by CAREFULLY microwaving it on short bursts (I use the defrost setting on mine, as I have ruined it before my overheating it).   Then once it's on it will set lovely and hard sitting at room temperature, which is ideal.

 

If you have made a batch and it isn't setting hard enough, it means there is too much cream vs chocolate.  So next time you make it, use less cream.  Or you could try to firm it up by scraping it off the cake, back into a bowl, and then incorporate into the mixture some extra melted chocolate, to up amount of chocolate.

 

When I make mine, after it has sat at room temperature overnight, it is at the consistency of very firm peanut butter.  For me, this is a little too difficult to spread onto the cake, so I soften it in the microwave.

 

I know I have had many, many battles with ganache.  Which to me seemed ridiculous, as it has a whole two ingredients!  But I have had much better success more recently, so I urge you to persist.  It's worth it when you can stand back and look at your gorgeous, perfectly smooth ganache crumb coat.

MBalaska Posted 12 Apr 2014 , 3:54am
post #5 of 11

Not that I may help, but what brand and type of chocolate are you using?  Maybe that will help with answers.

luvmykids2bits Posted 12 Apr 2014 , 4:18am
post #6 of 11

I've tried all different kinds. Lindt chocolate, PC Brand chocolate, Chipits semi-sweet chocolate chips, bulk grocery store dark chocolate wafers (brand unknown).   What brand gives the most success?

mcaulir Posted 12 Apr 2014 , 10:40am
post #7 of 11

If it's too stiff to spread, you can jst microwave it until it's the right consistency for spreading. Then as you're using it, if it sets hard again, just microwave again.

 

I always make mine to hard to spread and nuke it to use.

Foxrose Posted 12 Apr 2014 , 12:06pm
post #8 of 11

Have a look at this video.  Once I made one batch the way Michelle does I have never had a failure.  Hope it helps.

 


Rfisher Posted 12 Apr 2014 , 2:11pm
post #9 of 11

AIf you are using cup measurements, one thing to I can throw out there as a suggestion...a cup of chips will be a different weight vs a cup of callets, wafers, chunks, block shavings..........all of these will differ in the ratio affecting outcome. This might explain some inconsistencies in your tests that might make it difficult for you to find out what works for you.

mcaulir Posted 14 Apr 2014 , 9:17pm
post #10 of 11

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rfisher 

If you are using cup measurements, one thing to I can throw out there as a suggestion...a cup of chips will be a different weight vs a cup of callets, wafers, chunks, block shavings..........all of these will differ in the ratio affecting outcome. This might explain some inconsistencies in your tests that might make it difficult for you to find out what works for you.

Yes, definitely get  scale and weigh your chocolate.

AZCouture Posted 14 Apr 2014 , 10:24pm
post #11 of 11

Oh wow, I can't fathom getting consistent results unless I was using weight. I don't measure anything with cups or teaspoons actually, no cake recipes, nothing. So much easier to use that scale! :)

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