Carrot Cake Disaster

Decorating By Linz64 Updated 11 Apr 2014 , 8:43pm by LoveMeSomeCake615

Linz64 Posted 8 Apr 2014 , 10:10pm
post #1 of 7

How do you prevent a 12" round carrot cake getting too moist?

I recently made one as part of a 3-tier wedding cake but was returned by the customer unused! Despite the chef thinking it wasn't cooked properly I can assure you it was. The mistake I think I made here was sandwich the two cakes with cheese frosting which the cake has inadvertently absorbed completely, turning the cake into a moist goo!!  Evidence of this shows when you see there's no filling to be seen between the layers. :-o I'm assuming that because the outside finish was made of fondant icing this hasn't helped the situation either......prevented the cake from breathing? Directly underneath the fondant is a thin layer of what looks like shiny slime ie. remnants of cheese frosting! :( 


I appreciate carrot cake is meant to be moist in consistency but don't understand why it's absorbed the cream filling so much? Is this the norm? 


The customer thankfully couldn't have been any more understanding and thought I'd like to see evidence of the cake. Constructive criticism can be very useful for future reference but in this instance I can't help feel I let the B&G down on their special day. It had to be the biggest of the tiers as well....aagh!

I obviously have offered a part refund as well as a freebie replacement cake.


Anyone with helpful advice out there would be most appreciated. I'm a self taught baker specialising in 3d novelty cakes and want to make sure this mishap NEVER happens again.



6 replies
reginaherrin Posted 8 Apr 2014 , 10:24pm
post #2 of 7

So am I understanding that the cream cheese filling was completely absorbed into the cake layers?  Did that make the fondant sag or anything?  I am not sure what could have happened unless the cream cheese just melted.  I have made carrot cake before which is always moist but never had this happen before.  Sorry this happened to you.

Faradaye Posted 8 Apr 2014 , 10:24pm
post #3 of 7

ADid you fill the cake while it was still warm? Was the filling very runny? They are the two reasons I can think of off the top of my head as to hy that might happen.

I'm sorry it happene. Yes, we all want a nice, moist cake. But not quite THAT moist!

-K8memphis Posted 8 Apr 2014 , 11:16pm
post #4 of 7

i squeeze the juice out of my carrots--freshly grated carrots are like fountains-- and i enjoy a cup of juice when i make a carrot cake--i mean just by hand in cheesecloth--you didn't have pineapple in there didja? because that would add to the liquid issue--


i'd test out that recipe---for your own peace of mind--


also--how did you hold the finished work? in the fridge or at room temp? was your icing recipe safe at room temp?

Mel37 Posted 9 Apr 2014 , 10:46am
post #5 of 7

AOh dear poor you! Do you know if the cake was put in a warm, sunny spot perhaps? That might not have helped things if the cream cheese frosting 'melted'?

This is actually the reason I don't do cream cheese icing for any of my cakes, I find it so temperamental. For a carrot cake I recommend my customers have lemon or orange buttercream, because I can't bear the thought of cream cheese sitting out all day...!

Danilou Posted 9 Apr 2014 , 10:50am
post #6 of 7

AWhat was the cream cheese recipe and how long was it sitting out for?

LoveMeSomeCake615 Posted 11 Apr 2014 , 8:43pm
post #7 of 7

Sounds like the cream cheese icing was way too loose and runny, which is common for cc icing to get that way. It's really easy to add too much liquid or not have the right ratio of cream cheese to sugar- if you're going to use cream cheese icing, it needs to be shelf stable so that it hold up well to heat and decorating. Here's the cc icing recipe we use, and it works great- although we use all butter instead of shortening and it still turns out fine.

Quote by @%username% on %date%