Holding Cake Batter...can I Add Baking Powder Just Before Baking?

Baking By patricdeimon Updated 5 Apr 2014 , 11:01pm by auzzi

patricdeimon Posted 4 Apr 2014 , 2:39pm
post #1 of 12

ABaking coffee cake for an early morning meeting. I understand from an earlier thread here that it is practical to make and hold cake batter, but it seems to work against the rising power of the BP. Would it work to leave out the BP until just before baking the cake? Or is it too hard too incorporate fully?

I sense an experiment in my near future.

11 replies
lkritchey Posted 4 Apr 2014 , 2:43pm
post #2 of 12

AI'd be concerned that the batter would be overmixed by the time the baking powder is fully incorporated - or that it may not incorporate fully, but if you try it - let us know how it turns out!

patricdeimon Posted 4 Apr 2014 , 3:09pm
post #3 of 12

Ait is worth an experiment. However, if I scale everything the night before it is only 10 minutes or so to mix. It will take the oven longer that that to pre-heat.

lkritchey Posted 4 Apr 2014 , 3:21pm
post #4 of 12

AYeah, that would probably be what I'd do, pre-measure everything the night before. I've had one too many failed 'experiments' for events that I am serving something (whether it be cake or dinner, etc). I prefer to go the safe route if it's anyone other than just me and the family - and do the trial and error in personal baking first :)

MimiFix Posted 4 Apr 2014 , 4:07pm
post #5 of 12

You should be fine mixing everything together and putting the batter in your fridge. Tomorrow just bake as usual. I've done this for 30 plus years with no problems.

soldiernurse Posted 4 Apr 2014 , 5:20pm
post #6 of 12

Quote:

Originally Posted by MimiFix 
 

You should be fine mixing everything [including baking powder right?] together and putting the batter in your fridge. Tomorrow just bake as usual. I've done this for 30 plus years with no problems.

 

 

..would you bring the batter to room temp or bake right away? Does that work with ALL batter?

MimiFix Posted 4 Apr 2014 , 7:49pm
post #7 of 12

Refrigerating (or freezing) batters is common practice in retail/commercial bakeries. There might be some recipes that won't work properly, but I've never had a problem. All my muffin, coffeecake, cake, cookie batters and doughs were mixed in a 30 qt mixer.

 

All ingredients are incorporated, including leaveners. Batters are poured into tubs and placed in the cooler. The morning baker (usually me) scoops out muffins and pans coffeecakes right from the refrigerated tubs. Oil-based batters are only slightly thicker but butter based batters are quite thick. No matter, just pan and bake immediately.

 

This method allows bakeries to have a variety of scratch-made products without having to mix and bake small batches. 

patricdeimon Posted 4 Apr 2014 , 8:10pm
post #8 of 12

AThanks Mimifix. That is helpful info. Spooky but helpful. it makes great sense that baking lends itself to an industrial kind of usefulness and working in catering kitchens we'd use all sorts of chilled and frozen batters and doughs as well as cooking and holding anything under the sun that had to go out the next day.

Baking has this lore of time sensitivity, scaling sensitivity, method sensitivity, precision and on and on but some of my favorite breads and treats have come from wildly over-proofing, under-proofing spacing out the bake time, under baking, wrong ingredient list and misreading lists. Food has a forgiveness to it.

What got me through my practicals in culinary school was always saying to myself, "It's just cooking".

MimiFix Posted 4 Apr 2014 , 8:21pm
post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by patricdeimon 

Baking has this lore of time sensitivity, scaling sensitivity, method sensitivity, precision and on and on but some of my favorite breads and treats have come from wildly over-proofing, under-proofing spacing out the bake time, under baking, wrong ingredient list and misreading lists. Food has a forgiveness to it.

 

Hmmm, I don't know. I would never wildly under- or over-proof any yeasted item. I know what can happen. And underbaking has it's own inherent issues. Yes, there's some forgiveness, but many things can go wrong if we don't pay attention. Good luck in your career!  And welcome to CC!!

patricdeimon Posted 4 Apr 2014 , 9:16pm
post #10 of 12

AAnd to you too.

MangoLassi Posted 5 Apr 2014 , 5:35am
post #11 of 12

Love this website, I've been wondering for years if its okay to "hold" batter(even if its just for an hour or two)! And now I found this thread:lol:

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