Airbrushing A Whole Cake

Decorating By centille Updated 13 May 2014 , 12:42pm by cazza1

centille Posted 1 Apr 2014 , 1:54am
post #1 of 7

Hello all! I'm currently considering to get an airbrush set and hoping you could shed some light to my question. 

 

I'm planning to use the airbrush primarily to give an even coat of color on the entire cake. After making a few cakes that required LOTS of food coloring to achieve very strong and dark colors (spiderman red, jet black darth vader etc), I wonder if airbrush is the way to go.  I'm thinking by airbrushing, I won't have to color all the buttercream or fondant to cover the cake, and by doing so, i will use much less food coloring, and wont alter the taste and consistency of the buttercream and fondant, it'd be so much easier to just leave everything white and give it a spay of whatever color i need. Wouldn't it be wonderful??!! :-D:-D:-DIs this already a pretty common practice? If not, why not?

 

My further questions are:

 

1. Would the airbrushed color be bold and vibrant (on fondant covered cake and buttercream cake)? Is it dependent on the brand of the color? If so, in your experience, what brand is best to achieve that?

2. Would the color fade over time as it gets absorbed into the buttercream/fondant? If so, how many days after it's applied, would you say, would you start to notice the fading.

 

Thank you all for any thoughts and input you have!

6 replies
FioreCakes Posted 12 May 2014 , 10:15pm
post #2 of 7

I was browsing some airbrush threads and realized your question never was answered. Yes, you can airbrush a whole cake, and yes the color remains vibrant ( I use kopykake colors). The ONLY drawback to airbrushing the color that I have encountered it that it you accidentally touch the cake the color will be gone. For example, if you color the icing and accidentally bump the icing, you just have to re-smooth. If you airbrush with say black, and bump the icing, then white will show, and you can't just re-smooth it because there is a gaping hole of white. So you have to be extra careful with airbrushed cakes! 

howsweet Posted 12 May 2014 , 11:19pm
post #3 of 7

And another thing is on fondant cakes, if there's the slightest irregularity in the fondant, the airbrush will emphasize it. For example, little spots with a little elephant skin or where an air bubble was, that otherwise would have gone unnoticed. And you do not want to have a blow out on an airbrushed cake.

 

 

 

jennicake Posted 13 May 2014 , 5:07am
post #4 of 7

Also want to add, if you are trying to airbrush a dark color on a fondant covered cake, you will need to go over the entire thing with multiple coats of color to give it a completely even tone.  I've done this with navy blue and red a couple times already, works well!

Claire138 Posted 13 May 2014 , 6:27am
post #5 of 7

I bought an airbrush kit last year (Dinkydoodle) and have not looked back. It's wonderful, in fact the only drawback I can think of is that I'm left with a ton of regular colour gels that I can't see myself ever needing again.

Seriously, go for it:)

jsmith795 Posted 13 May 2014 , 8:37am
post #6 of 7

Quote:

Originally Posted by Claire138 
 

I bought an airbrush kit last year (Dinkydoodle) and have not looked back. It's wonderful, in fact the only drawback I can think of is that I'm left with a ton of regular colour gels that I can't see myself ever needing again.

Seriously, go for it:)

 

Exactly this :D 

cazza1 Posted 13 May 2014 , 12:42pm
post #7 of 7

I am able to make my fondant much more vibrant looking when I airbrush than when I add the color to the fondant. I also find it much more enjoyable airbrushing a whole cake than trying to knead in enough color to serve my purpose. 

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