Easter Basket Cake Handle

Decorating By anne68 Updated 31 Mar 2014 , 12:29pm by DeniseNH

anne68 Posted 30 Mar 2014 , 9:52pm
post #1 of 9

Grrrrr!!!!! Not having much luck with this! I am on my third attempt and it looks rubbish! I have tried it with and without floristry wire, CMC, drying it flat and drying it draped over a bowl! 

I find the CMC dries it out really fast and it ends up cracking. Very fed up now!!!! Any step by step tips would be appreciated. 

8 replies
DeniseNH Posted 30 Mar 2014 , 11:08pm
post #2 of 9

I gave up and used strips of heavy duty plastic net - the type that little old ladies in rest homes cut to shape and make tissue holders and ornaments out of by stitching designs on them.  Cut strips  - then cut the ends into a V shape (point) and bind together with ribbon wound around and around from one end to the other.  Then simply insert into the cake.

ellavanilla Posted 31 Mar 2014 , 8:27am
post #3 of 9

AWhat about plastic tubing? Planet cake uses it in their purse cake tutorial.

LizzieAylett Posted 31 Mar 2014 , 9:06am
post #4 of 9

At the last meeting of my local British Sugarcr4ft Guild, the guy was working with chocolate.  He had done a basket handle by blitzing chocolate in the food processor until it was a fine dust, and then molding that together into shape.  It was very strong, with a matt finish.  Would that work for you?

cakebaby2 Posted 31 Mar 2014 , 9:23am
post #5 of 9

Quote:

Originally Posted by LizzieAylett 
 

At the last meeting of my local British Sugarcr4ft Guild, the guy was working with chocolate.  He had done a basket handle by blitzing chocolate in the food processor until it was a fine dust, and then molding that together into shape.  It was very strong, with a matt finish.  Would that work for you?

What a brilliant idea! Is there no end to the genius tips on this site.

LizzieAylett Posted 31 Mar 2014 , 11:01am
post #6 of 9

I was impressed too by all the ways this guy used chocolate :-)

 

Another chocolatey option would be to use modelling chocolate.  I'd probably wrap it round a wire just to make sure it stood up properly, but it should end up nice and smooth and even.

DeniseNH Posted 31 Mar 2014 , 11:35am
post #7 of 9

I've also heard of people purchasing old easter baskets on discount after the holiday has passed and removing the rush handle to be used on cakes.  I tried finding rush in the craft store without luck but I know that people use it to make rush chair seats and when soaked over night, it can be bent and dried into any shape needed.

cakebaby2 Posted 31 Mar 2014 , 12:21pm
post #8 of 9

Most paper based products react the same way when moistened, moulded and left to dry, I think from a food based angle the bent and moulded choc sounds more organic if you cant be sure the recipient wont try to nibble on the handle? (Even the family pooch)

Using discarded baskets, particularly those recycled several times from charity shops etc doesn't seem a good way to go, better pleating softened liquorice sticks etc and popping them in a freezer for a while?

DeniseNH Posted 31 Mar 2014 , 12:28pm
post #9 of 9

I agree, using basket handles from an unknown source is not recommended.  But new discounted basket handles, wound tightly with ribbon and if you feel better about it,dip the ends being pushed into the cake, in a coating of white chocolate as added protection.  Hundreds of thousands of Easter Baskets have been sold over the last 60 (plus) years and I've never heard a news story of a dogs death as a result.  Dogs chew sticks routinely in their back yards.  :-) 

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