Everyone Loved The Cake To I Want Refund

Business By krissy50 Updated 24 Mar 2014 , 2:13am by sarahgale314

krissy50 Posted 18 Mar 2014 , 9:08pm
post #1 of 34

ARecently made a cake for a woman who said her guests loved it. Posted this the day of party. Two days later wanted to know how she could moisten a dry cake since she had leftovers. Then another fb post stating her guest loved the look of the cake but found it dry. She ask for full refund. I sent an email stating this is the first complaint using this batter and I found the cake to be moist when leveling, filling and frosting. I made another cake that day out of same batter and emailed the customer asking how she liked her cake. Thought it tasted great and looked wonderful. I also have test strips, etc to double check dryness and am quite sure it was not dry. This customer did not like my response and posted on my fb page how terrible her cake was. She had her friends and family do the same everytime I refused a refund. She wants to bring the cake into the store four days later to show me. This cake was made the day of the party. Sorry to go on but very anxious over this. I had a feeling she would be difficult because she was unhappy w the previous bakery that did her last cake for her. (Same complaints dry cake). I know the owner of this bakery and he does beautiful work. I've tried blocking her from my business fb page but it doesn't work. She had her friends comment and block me from seeing them. How do I handle this?

33 replies
CakesbyKadi Posted 18 Mar 2014 , 9:55pm
post #2 of 34

If it were me, I would make a public statement. Now let me say, I am not the type that "kisses up" to earn business. If a customer treats me badly, I will not deal with them again. If I lose money from it, oh well. Anyway, I would post something about how dedicated you are to your work and you are always open to feedback, etc. I would also go on about public bashers. I haven't had to deal with this. One lady damaged her cake to get a refund. I called her out on it, then she flat our ignored me. I never heard a word since. If I make a mistake, I own up to it. But thumb prints in the cake and a claim that the icing fell? No. However, she did not bash me so I have not dealt with a public harassment yet. So sorry that you are. =(

krissy50 Posted 18 Mar 2014 , 10:46pm
post #3 of 34

AThank you so much for responding. I stand behind this cake.

Cakepro Posted 18 Mar 2014 , 11:10pm
post #4 of 34

Exactly what kind of test strip do you have that tests for moisture in your baked cakes?  I'm intrigued.

 

I've only had one lady do to me what your customer is doing to you, and even though I KNOW the cake was moist, I gave her back half of her money and made her sign a waiver that the issue was settled.  I just didn't want her doing a chargeback on a $150 cake and risking losing all of the money.  But I know that cake was excellent.  I hope you are able to get her off your back.  Some people are just downright slimy.

costumeczar Posted 19 Mar 2014 , 12:05am
post #5 of 34

How much was the cake that she originally purchased? if it's a small amount it might be easier to give her a refund, put her on the "no cake for you" list and chalk it up to a lesson about listening to your psycho radar, since you said she seemed like trouble to begin with.

 

If it's a lot and you can't take the loss, I would tell her that you're not giving her anything else since she posted publicly that the cake was good the day of the party. Bringing in leftover cake that's been refrigerated and dried out isn't an option, it won't prove anything. If she keeps up the harassment online just ban her and her friends from your facebook page whenever they post anything on it. If they post things on their own pages who cares, you don't want her friends for customers anyway since they're probably like she is.

krissy50 Posted 19 Mar 2014 , 3:21am
post #6 of 34

AThe cake was $120. Thank you for your response I appreciate it.

howsweet Posted 19 Mar 2014 , 2:21pm
post #7 of 34

ACurious about the cake strips, too :)

Also, I sell cakes full time in a large city and have never once run across these types of customers. I have customers in a 50 mile radius. If you have this happen often, it might be a good idea to look to your business practices. If you aren't charging enough, you're going to wind up with customers who don't properly appreciate your product. While there are going to be some people grateful to get a a cake they couldn't otherwise afford, there are predator customers who will take you for whatever they can. A person recognizing the value of your cake who doesn't try to get you to make it for less than its worth is so much less likely to be a predator.

If you have a shop and do high volume low end cakes that's going to be less true and it's just the cost of doing business. But by definition, if you're selling cake for less than the value, this is where the predator customers are going to be. Make sure you're not in the jungle :)

howsweet Posted 19 Mar 2014 , 2:32pm
post #8 of 34

Sorry, I just realized I should qualify that...what I'm referring to when I say low end cakes is the price. Not quality. For example if you sell the most delicious 9 inch carrot cake, it's in a lower price end than a 3 tier topsy turvy cake covered with flowers.

eatmycakebaby Posted 19 Mar 2014 , 3:19pm
post #9 of 34

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cakepro 
 

Exactly what kind of test strip do you have that tests for moisture in your baked cakes?  I'm intrigued.

 

 

ME 3:smile:

AZCouture Posted 19 Mar 2014 , 4:27pm
post #10 of 34

AAdd me to the list of curious people wanting to know what the test strips are that you speak of, [@]krissy50[/@]

MimiFix Posted 19 Mar 2014 , 4:32pm
post #11 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZCouture 

Add me to the list of curious people wanting to know what the test strips are that you speak of, @krissy50

Me 5

OneHotMess Posted 20 Mar 2014 , 2:08am
post #12 of 34

I didn't find anything related to moisture testing "strips." However, a little flexing of the Google-fu led me to the Model DG-9 for Powdered and Granular Materials! I'd link it, but that's a pretty specific search term...

It's handheld, probe-style, can be used in baked goods (and their component pieces such as flours, grains, sugars, etc - basically, all the "dry" things that you don't actually want to be *too* dry), and looks to be ridiculously expensive. Useful, but ridiculously expensive. And requiring laboratory calibration.

 

Maybe that's so scientists can get free cake? Hmm...

 

But really, all goofing aside, add my name to the list of people who want to know more about these moisture strips. Ms. Beranbaum has a yellow cake that makes me want to tear my hair out. Moisture strips will go a long way to figuring out What The Hobart Mixer I am doing wrong when I make it.

krissy50 Posted 20 Mar 2014 , 2:14am
post #13 of 34

ASorry to confuse everyone about test strips. There is no such thing I was referring to strips of cake I checked when leveling. Should been more specific so sorry. Thank you all for your input. Blessings.

costumeczar Posted 20 Mar 2014 , 10:29am
post #14 of 34

Quote:

Originally Posted by OneHotMess 
 

 

 

But really, all goofing aside, add my name to the list of people who want to know more about these moisture strips. Ms. Beranbaum has a yellow cake that makes me want to tear my hair out. Moisture strips will go a long way to figuring out What The Hobart Mixer I am doing wrong when I make it.

I bet I know what yellow cake recipe that is...I have one of her recipes that I use sometimes but I had to do some seriousl tweaking of it, to the point that it's not even recognizable as her recipe anymore. I think it's the downy butter cake or something like that? It's not you, it's the recipe.

OneHotMess Posted 20 Mar 2014 , 1:50pm
post #15 of 34

Quote:

Originally Posted by costumeczar 
 

I bet I know what yellow cake recipe that is...I have one of her recipes that I use sometimes but I had to do some seriousl tweaking of it, to the point that it's not even recognizable as her recipe anymore. I think it's the downy butter cake or something like that? It's not you, it's the recipe.

You just made my morning. Seriously, I could have a whole parade of leprechauns and unicorns come traipzing through my living room and my response would be, "No. Still not as amazing as costumeczar."

 

My cake science is not as strong as it needs to be in order to adulterate the recipe, but yes, that's the cake. It's like a leaden brick of crushed dreams and failed special events. If someone ever burgled my home while I was mid-icing, I would simply club them unconscious with it, take time to buttercream the slabs back together before calling law enforcement, and continue on until the ambulance showed up to cart the criminal off for head trauma.

 

It's probably been done to death, but I want to start a "What's Your 'White Whale'?" thread. Everyone's got to have a cake that they just can't get to turn out.

costumeczar Posted 20 Mar 2014 , 3:32pm
post #16 of 34

Quote:

Originally Posted by OneHotMess 
 

You just made my morning. Seriously, I could have a whole parade of leprechauns and unicorns come traipzing through my living room and my response would be, "No. Still not as amazing as costumeczar."

 

 

Hahaha!

AZCouture Posted 20 Mar 2014 , 3:35pm
post #17 of 34

A[@]OneHotMess[/@], you're gonna fit in just fine around here. :D

itsacake Posted 20 Mar 2014 , 3:58pm
post #18 of 34

I think the problem with that cake is that the crumb is just too fine..  Even when the cake is  oozing moisture from a wash, the texture is almost sandy and  therefore the tongue perceives it as dry.  I finally gave up on it.  Flo Braker has some nice, really moist, yellow cakes in her books.  I just used her Signature yellow cake yesterday and took some uniced samples to an appointment.  They were gone in less than five minutes to rave reviews.  

morganchampagne Posted 20 Mar 2014 , 4:25pm
post #19 of 34

AI make that cake all the time, no modification and people love it. It's so funny to hear different experiences. It's a fan favorite around here

morganchampagne Posted 20 Mar 2014 , 4:26pm
post #20 of 34

AIt's never been dry to me...the white cake I don't like. But the yellow cake is amazing to me. Very funny

OneHotMess Posted 20 Mar 2014 , 5:10pm
post #21 of 34

Quote:

Originally Posted by AZCouture 

@OneHotMess, you're gonna fit in just fine around here. icon_biggrin.gif


I knew those sacrificial fondant lambs I offered up on my altar of gumpaste flowers would help me get in good!

 

And so my flattery is complete, may I say holy MO-sus, your work is unreal. Next time you have an opening for a floor-sweeper, trash-picker, or crumb-licker, let me know. I'm on the next plane out, free of charge.

OneHotMess Posted 20 Mar 2014 , 5:14pm
post #22 of 34

Quote:

Originally Posted by itsacake 
 

I think the problem with that cake is that the crumb is just too fine..  Even when the cake is  oozing moisture from a wash, the texture is almost sandy and  therefore the tongue perceives it as dry.  I finally gave up on it.  Flo Braker has some nice, really moist, yellow cakes in her books.  I just used her Signature yellow cake yesterday and took some uniced samples to an appointment.  They were gone in less than five minutes to rave reviews.  

 

This! This a thousand times. Though I snuggled up with my copy of Toba's yellow cake recipe yesterday...ended up with a cake so moist you could practically wring it out and get an ocean of mini-cakelets. So consistently moist it's a crime. Adore it.

 

I'll have to look for Flo's - I'm now picturing that insurance commercial where the husband's living room and wife slowly morph into the insurance lady of the same name, all while she stirs a bowl of batter. :)

AZCouture Posted 20 Mar 2014 , 6:20pm
post #23 of 34

AOne

Original message sent by OneHotMess

I knew those sacrificial fondant lambs I offered up on my altar of gumpaste flowers would help me get in good!

And so my flattery is complete, may I say holy MO-sus, your work is unreal. Next time you have an opening for a floor-sweeper, trash-picker, or crumb-licker, let me know. I'm on the next plane out, free of charge.

Ha ha ha! Watch out, might take you up on that when it comes time for a deep cleaning!

erin2345 Posted 21 Mar 2014 , 1:00pm
post #24 of 34

I believe a few of the Rose recipes are actually printed wrong in the book.  I recall reading ages ago that there were corrected version available.  But I don't recall where - sry!

IowaBaker Posted 21 Mar 2014 , 7:30pm
post #25 of 34

There apparently have been several errors in her books. From her own website: http://www.realbakingwithrose.com/book_errata/ 

costumeczar Posted 21 Mar 2014 , 9:00pm
post #26 of 34

Quote:

Originally Posted by IowaBaker 
 

There apparently have been several errors in her books. From her own website: http://www.realbakingwithrose.com/book_errata/

Her baking forums are really useful if you're trying to improve your baking skills, too.

nancylee61 Posted 23 Mar 2014 , 12:35pm
post #27 of 34

A

Original message sent by OneHotMess

You just made my morning. Seriously, I could have a whole parade of leprechauns and unicorns come traipzing through my living room and my response would be, "No. Still not as amazing as costumeczar."

My cake science is not as strong as it needs to be in order to adulterate the recipe, but yes, that's the cake. It's like a leaden brick of crushed dreams and failed special events. If someone ever burgled my home while I was mid-icing, I would simply club them unconscious with it, take time to buttercream the slabs back together before calling law enforcement, and continue on until the ambulance showed up to cart the criminal off for head trauma.

It's probably been done to death, but I want to start a "What's Your 'White Whale'?" thread. Everyone's got to have a cake that they just can't get to turn out.

I just made this cake and it was terribly dry! Great flavor, sawdust in your mouth. Itching the recipe is very temperamental, because I followed her recipe exactly! Is her yellow velvet cake any better?

(Sorry for the thread hijack)

Nancy

costumeczar Posted 23 Mar 2014 , 8:09pm
post #28 of 34

A

Original message sent by morganchampagne

I make that cake all the time, no modification and people love it. It's so funny to hear different experiences. It's a fan favorite around here

Okay, it's time for you to do a video of yourself making this recipe so we can see why it works for you!

morganchampagne Posted 23 Mar 2014 , 9:17pm
post #29 of 34

ALOL'! I went around and asked other clients if they thought it was off or dry and they all said they loved it! I swear I do nothing different than what's on the recipe. But I don't use the one in the front of the back. I've calculated for pan sizes using the rose factor

OneHotMess Posted 23 Mar 2014 , 11:15pm
post #30 of 34

Quote:

Originally Posted by costumeczar 


Okay, it's time for you to do a video of yourself making this recipe so we can see why it works for you!

 

This. A thousand times, this. Rose factor, cake factor, factor-of-pi...wait...pie is a different online community. Hm.

 

Sometimes I wonder if those little adjustments and personal preference tweaks we make become so rote, to us, that we totally forget we do them. When we explain the recipe to someone else, or say it's a complete success, we're totally forgetting the three phials of arsenic we threw in right before baking. Because we do it every time. You know...maybe that's why I don't like the taste of my yellow cake.

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