Just Ordered An Onlay Mold

Decorating By Emily104 Updated 17 Mar 2014 , 7:04pm by Emily104

Emily104 Posted 14 Mar 2014 , 7:52pm
post #1 of 11

Hello! I wanted to know if I can use my onlay chevron mold as a guide? There a a couple of little girls that are counting on me to make their birthday cake and they've each asked for a chevron cake. The thing is, I've never really worked with fondant so, I didn't know if  it could only be used with fondant or if it could be used to mark the lines on the cake and be filled in with buttercream frosting. 

Any ideas??

Thank you in advance to all the wonderful suggestions!

10 replies
kellyk1234 Posted 14 Mar 2014 , 9:24pm
post #2 of 11

Ahttp://www.marvelousmolds.com/free-videos/onlays-master-class

This video is very helpful, I haven't used a onlay mold yet, but I have to soon and I'm pretty confident I can do it after watching this.

SweetShop5 Posted 15 Mar 2014 , 2:54am
post #3 of 11

I want to order one so badly but the shipping is absolutely ridiculous.

kellyk1234 Posted 15 Mar 2014 , 3:18am
post #4 of 11

A

Original message sent by SweetShop5

I want to order one so badly but the shipping is absolutely ridiculous.

Have you checked globalsugarart.com. Their shipping prices are reasonable. I see you're in Ontario, they're located in upstate New York so shipping may not be too bad.

JinxInk Posted 15 Mar 2014 , 3:22am
post #5 of 11

SweetShop5: Marvelous Molds are on sale at Icing Inspirations in Kitchener, Ontario. 

http://icinginspirations.myshopify.com/pages/promotions

DeniseNH Posted 15 Mar 2014 , 3:35am
post #6 of 11

I've used the Chevron onlays before and they are wonderful.  I purchased the large and the medium.  There's a slight learning curve to any new mold and the secrets to getting onlays straight on the cake is to press lightly with your rolling pin and press several times until you can see that the design has impressed crisply.  Then I placed the mat with the chevron on it in the freezer for 5 minutes.  They came out nice and stiff and easy to apply.  Have fun.  Oh wait, also use fondant and gumpaste - half and half.  Fondant alone stretches and you can't roll it extra thin like you can gumpaste.

kellyk1234 Posted 15 Mar 2014 , 4:50am
post #7 of 11

A

Original message sent by DeniseNH

Oh wait, also use fondant and gumpaste - half and half.  Fondant alone stretches and you can't roll it extra thin like you can gumpaste.

Does the gumpaste make it too hard where it crumbles/cracks when the cake is cut or when it's eaten? In other words, is it still soft enough to eat?

DeniseNH Posted 15 Mar 2014 , 11:10am
post #8 of 11

No, actually the gumpaste gives it structure so that you can cut it clean and apply it without stretching.  If it's paper thin when applied to your cake, it will be easy to cut through, unlike thicker plain fondant.  Most guests ignore fondant and don't eat it anyway so eating usually isn't an issue and if they're paper thin, they're both easy to cut and eat.  Fondant keeps the gumpaste soft.  Definitely good to eat.  Hope you watch the film someone suggested above, because it gives you another great idea of pressing the fondant right out of the mold onto lightly greased waxed paper - lining up the design on paper then spritzing it lightly with water, or brushing in Cricso or corn syrup - pressing the paper to the cake side then peeling away the paper - to get a more concise lineup.

kellyk1234 Posted 15 Mar 2014 , 12:47pm
post #9 of 11

AI posted the video. Thanks, I'll have to try that when I use it, the gumpaste and wax paper transfer. I'm going to be using the moroccan lattice mold.

debcons Posted 15 Mar 2014 , 4:56pm
post #10 of 11

AI got a deco mat from Www.decobake.com at cake show in November in Birmingham and best 20 quid I ever spent x

Emily104 Posted 17 Mar 2014 , 7:04pm
post #11 of 11

Thank you! I think I'm going to dive right in and try this!

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