Why Can't I Get This Right?

Decorating By Pastrybaglady Updated 28 Mar 2014 , 7:42pm by MBalaska

Pastrybaglady Posted 10 Mar 2014 , 5:17pm
post #1 of 12

For the life of me I cannot make a good scratch cake just using cake flour.  At first I thought it was because I wasn't sifting into the measuring cup, but even after I did that the cake is super dense and gummy.  I did the reverse creaming and try to mix as little as possible on low.  Is that the problem, so I need to put the spurs to it?  Everything I read about cake flour says it will make a fluffier and tender crumbed cake - I keep getting the opposite.  What am I doing wrong? :(

11 replies
BeesKnees578 Posted 10 Mar 2014 , 5:50pm
post #2 of 12

Can you post recipe?  That will help the chemistry of baking people help you.

Rfisher Posted 10 Mar 2014 , 9:21pm
post #3 of 12

AI'm no expert, but from what I understand, reverse creaming method doesn't always necessarily go hand in hand with " trying to mix as little as possible....."

Pastrybaglady Posted 10 Mar 2014 , 9:53pm
post #4 of 12

5 C cake flour

3 1/3 C sugar

2 1/2 T. baking soda

2 t. salt

1 C milk

1 1/3 C butter

5 whole eggs

1 T. vanilla

LizzieAylett Posted 10 Mar 2014 , 10:19pm
post #5 of 12

I don't know much about cake chemistry, but could it be that the baking soda should be baking powder?

Pastrybaglady Posted 10 Mar 2014 , 10:28pm
post #6 of 12

Oops, you are right!

 

I typed that wrong, should read 2T + 1 tsp baking powder and 1/2 t baking soda.  For some reason I added them together, but in the cake I did it the right way.

natt12321 Posted 11 Mar 2014 , 1:41am
post #7 of 12

A

Original message sent by Rfisher

I'm no expert, but from what I understand, reverse creaming method doesn't always necessarily go hand in hand with " trying to mix as little as possible....."

As already stated, reverse creaming does not mean mix as little as possible, you can beat it on pretty high for a good while until you add the liquid anyway, but the added air from beating it well adds to the lightness of the cakes.

Pastrybaglady Posted 11 Mar 2014 , 4:33pm
post #8 of 12

Quote:

Originally Posted by natt12321 


As already stated, reverse creaming does not mean mix as little as possible, you can beat it on pretty high for a good while until you add the liquid anyway, but the added air from beating it well adds to the lightness of the cakes.

 

Ah, further study is warranted.  I got my hands on The Cake Bible, need to spend some time reading...  Thanks for the replies.

Pastrybaglady Posted 13 Mar 2014 , 3:49am
post #9 of 12

AOkay, so I spent some time reading Baking Illustrated and got the answer to my problem. The batter does require some vigorous beating before the batter goes into the pans. I like how Baking Illustrated gives you all the different methods they tried before arriving at their final recipe which is very detailed to the seconds of mixing.

costumeczar Posted 18 Mar 2014 , 11:57pm
post #10 of 12

That also seems like a lot of flour and sugar in the recipe itself. Try it with the extra mixing, but it could be that there's too much of those two ingredients.

Pastrybaglady Posted 28 Mar 2014 , 6:37am
post #11 of 12

I finally tried FromScratchSF's recipe.  Wow... so that's what vanilla cake is SUPPOSED to taste and feel like in your mouth!  It was so soft and velvety and delicious, just beautiful.  I will be using my scale a whole lot more now.

MBalaska Posted 28 Mar 2014 , 7:42pm
post #12 of 12

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pastrybaglady 
 

I finally tried FromScratchSF's recipe.  Wow... so that's what vanilla cake is SUPPOSED to taste and feel like in your mouth!  It was so soft and velvety and delicious, just beautiful.  I will be using my scale a whole lot more now.

Good for you!!  That is the solution to a lot of peoples baking problems.  Consistency and accuracy.

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