Should I Just Give Up Trying To Do This?

Decorating By miniflowercake Updated 3 Mar 2014 , 9:01pm by miniflowercake

miniflowercake Posted 2 Mar 2014 , 10:46pm
post #1 of 10

I'm getting close to my wits end. Fondant is driving me there. I can NOT seem to get my fondant covered cakes smooth. Here is a picture of my latest fondant covered cake:

 

 

Right then, the lumps and bumps weren't so noticeable but when I delivered and set up the cake it was bulgy and the little tear/stretch marks were a lot easier to see. I see cakes with beautiful crisp edges and sides and want mine to look better... 

 

Help please!

9 replies
MBalaska Posted 2 Mar 2014 , 11:01pm
post #2 of 10

Are you saying that you are in business selling fondant cakes that are sloppy and unprofessional?

if so then stop.

 

or are you a hobbyist making things for people for fun and to celebrate their happy occasions with them?

then keep at it, try a different fondant, practice your skills, get new tools, study, and keep plodding on. You have a million and one things to learn yet.  If your cakes taste great that's important while your fondant skills are low.  It doesn't mean that you CAN'T do it, You just don't know HOW to do it (yet).

 

You have a nice color use, a good design, and your sock monkey figurines are adorable.  If you should give up is your decision to make.  But you are way way better at this than I am right now. IMO

miniflowercake Posted 2 Mar 2014 , 11:33pm
post #3 of 10

I mainly make cakes for friends and family and when I have made them for customers, I've never done fondant. I've been told that my cakes taste good a lot, but I don't really like cake all that much. :oops: 

Apti Posted 3 Mar 2014 , 12:15am
post #4 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by miniflowercake 
 

I'm getting close to my wits end. Fondant is driving me there. I can NOT seem to get my fondant covered cakes smooth.

 

... the lumps and bumps weren't so noticeable but when I delivered and set up the cake it was bulgy and the little tear/stretch marks were a lot easier to see. I see cakes with beautiful crisp edges and sides and want mine to look better... 

MBalaska is correct, it takes lots and lots of practice...and bulges....and little tear/stretch marks....before you get to perfect.  The cake in the photo is lovely and I'll bet no one but you noticed any flaws. 

 

Although CakeCentral is a wonderful place, it can instill a sense of inadequacy in bakers who want to achieve the level of perfection seen on many cakes.  Lighten up on yourself!  These cakes are literally some of the best from all over the world!  Bakers from different countries use many different skill sets and techniques to achieve a specific look. 

 

Your cake is darling!  Go make another one, and another one and learn from your mistakes.  Come on, now....you probably already know that you are letting the perfectionist angel on your shoulder give you a bad time. 

miniflowercake Posted 3 Mar 2014 , 1:32am
post #5 of 10
I've been working with fondant for a couple of months now and I can cover a cake with it (for the most part) without wrinkles, but now my problem seems to be lumpiness and a few thin spots. I'm starting to think I need to roll it out thicker instead of thinner...? 
cazza1 Posted 3 Mar 2014 , 2:20am
post #6 of 10

Is it your fondant that is lumpy or your buttercream/ganache under the fondant.  If your base layer is not smooth then you are never going to get your fondant smooth.

Apti Posted 3 Mar 2014 , 2:27am
post #7 of 10

All you need to do is KEEP practicing.  The more you do, the better you will get.  When you look at many of the gorgeous cakes with flawless fondant, you are also looking at a huge variety of:

homemade or commercially prepared fondant?

what recipe homemade?

what brand commercial fondant?

buttercream under fondant?

marzipan under fondant?

chocolate ganache under fondant?

how thick is the under-coat of buttercream, IMBC, SMBC, marzipan, ganache, etc.?

mud cake, fruit cake, sponge cake, American cake mix cake, modified American cake mix cake, etc.?

how LONG did a particular cake take to create?

Is it a REAL cake to be consumed, or a DUMMY cake for display?

Fillings?  (only about a zillion possibilities)

How thick/thin/slippery is the filling?

Is there a dam?

Was the cake allowed to settle?

was the cake frozen & filled & covered with fondant.....

 

Well.   You get the idea.  The information provided in your 3 posts (about 15 sentences) is only enough for anyone in cake decorating to make a guess.    Cake decorating perfection doesn't just magically appear after a few months.  Compare this to learning a new language.  You don't become fluent in another language "in a few months".  However, with cake decorating, while you are learning, you and others get to eat a lot of tasty cake!

 

Here is a tutorial thread with  superb links for information freely available on the internet.  Hope some of this information is helpful.

 

"How-To tutorials/videos for Cake Decorators"

 

http://www.wilton.com/forums/messageview.cfm?catid=8&threadid=160184

Godot Posted 3 Mar 2014 , 4:42am
post #8 of 10

ATen.Thousand.Hours.

morganchampagne Posted 3 Mar 2014 , 5:41am
post #9 of 10

AYes. Hours and hours and hours. You will get there eventually, and you will be frustrated as hell along the way. But it will happen

miniflowercake Posted 3 Mar 2014 , 9:01pm
post #10 of 10

Thank you all for your replies! I think I need to work at getting my buttercream smoother and rolling my fondant slightly thicker. :)

 

and practicing on a LOT of cakes too!

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