Everything Is Bitter!!!!!!

Decorating By cakehappymommy Updated 1 Mar 2014 , 12:50am by hbquikcomjamesl

cakehappymommy Posted 28 Feb 2014 , 8:46pm
post #1 of 5

AUgh! I've used Wilton and americolor gel for frosting and candy melts and they are bitter!!!! I'm going to try using unsweetened cool aid...are my taste buds too sensitive or are they really bitter? I later tasted the coloring with a toothpick and BOY it was BITTER! Why don't they make them sweet???? I'm so perplexed as to why they are bitter!!! It's driving me insane!!! Lol so now I'll have to use cool aid?!?! How come store/restaurant desserts with frosting not taste bitter?? What are they using???

4 replies
ellavanilla Posted 28 Feb 2014 , 9:04pm
post #2 of 5

if you are tasting straight from the color pot, then of course it's bitter because it's meant to be mixed with something sweet. adding something to the color, just to sweeten it will only dilute the color, exacerbating the problem

 

many times a super saturated buttercream will be bitter, like red or black due to the amount of color needed to make the intense hue. I advise my clients against an entire red or black cake for that reason. 

 

candy melts are made of a lot of synthetic ingredients, which probably contributes to the bitterness, add to that, the high melt point and you've got an icky tasting product, IMO. 

cakehappymommy Posted 28 Feb 2014 , 9:08pm
post #3 of 5

AMakes sense for the candy melts...but I've used tiny amount on cream cheese frosting and still tasted the bitterness...I had a lot of white candy melts, so I needed to use them, but add coloring...I'm going to try unsweetened coolaid...but I just can't trust any food coloring at this point...I mean what else do they use?

ellavanilla Posted 1 Mar 2014 , 12:12am
post #4 of 5

i think you've got to keep trying. perhaps you need to add more flavoring to your buttercream? I can't think of anything worse than coloring with Kool Aid. It will taste like cotton candy. 

 

here's a google search for "all natural" food coloring

 

https://www.google.com/search?q=all+natural+food+coloring&rlz=1C1ASUT_enUS487US487&oq=all+natural+food+coloring&aqs=chrome..69i57j0l5.4276j0j7&sourceid=chrome&espv=210&es_sm=93&ie=UTF-8#q=all+natural+food+coloring&tbm=shop

hbquikcomjamesl Posted 1 Mar 2014 , 12:50am
post #5 of 5

In my strawberry marble cake, and in the base-coat and decorating frostings I came up with for it, I use lots of seedless strawberry jam, and only a little bit of the McCormick red from the grocer. The strawberry shapes piped on the cake are a bit light, but they're recognizable.

 

The brown lettering on my Leland Awards cakes was mainly colored by adding cinnamon, ground clove, and maybe a bit of ginger, along with a few drops of McCormick red, yellow, and green, to the maple-cinnamon buttercream that served as the base coat. It's way too light, and next time, I'm going to try and have some pro-grade brown food coloring.

 

Not wanting to load things with artificial colors, I made a decision long ago to be content with pastel shades, and to do the stronger colors with edible printing (which is just on the surface, after all).

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%