am I good enough?

Business By rachelcak3s Updated 26 Feb 2014 , 10:24pm by MBalaska

AZCouture Posted 26 Feb 2014 , 12:09am
post #91 of 116

Quote:

Originally Posted by BeesKnees578 
 

To bring this back to the issue at hand...

 

Improve your boards, either hot glue 3-4 rounds together, cover in fondant, and put a ribbon around it OR get the nicer 1/2" drums that come in either gold, silver or white from GSA and trim with ribbon.  I personally feel that self-covered boards with the foil stuff looks homey, not necessarily professional.  You could do that, though, and also trim out with ribbon.

 

Taller tiers...I aim for around 5" once all the icing and fondant is put on.  That seems to be the norm anymore as the 4" tall ones seem a bit squat.  If that means baking another layer...then bake another layer.  Or you can torte to get a little more height.

 

Your bow has the toothpick under it than you can see.  I have never made a bow with a toothpick, so this may be something that I am not aware of.  There are soooo many ways to make different styles of bows and they seem to always stress me out.  Check out some tutorials, if you haven't already.  I am considering that as well.

 

Writing....for a really professional look you can buy things called tappits or clicksticks that make letters a breeze after a little playing around with them, that is.  I hated them at first and now I love them because my writing on cakes STINKS!!

 

Hope that helps! 

 
Agree with making tiers taller. I really think 4" looks squatty too. I don't know why, and it's the standard, but it just does. Lots of styles of bows out there, for sure. If it's going to be a bow on top of a cake, I like to make them really poofy, and let them naturally kind of flare out at the bottom, like a bow would in real life. A fabricky bow anyways, I like the loose poofy look.
 
And the board....that's the number one thing in my book. A nice polished board pulls the whole project together, and doesn't have to cost more than a couple of dollars at most, to do. 
rachelcak3s Posted 26 Feb 2014 , 12:17am
post #92 of 116

AHow do you guys do the height? How many lauers of cake do you usually put in to one tier?

rachelcak3s Posted 26 Feb 2014 , 12:18am
post #93 of 116

AThe bottom has 3 but top only 2 I baked 3 for the top tier originally but thought it was going to look way to big..

morganchampagne Posted 26 Feb 2014 , 12:20am
post #94 of 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by rachelcak3s 

How do you guys do the height? How many lauers of cake do you usually put in to one tier?

 

It depends on the cake ...I used to 2 but i never got the height I wanted. So now I do 3..by the time I'm finished the height is a little more than 5" Tall. I think thats a bit more nice looking when the tiers are taller. But Im also considering how really tall pieces of cake look on the plate. So i try not to make it too tall

AZCouture Posted 26 Feb 2014 , 12:21am
post #95 of 116

Standard 2" Magic Line pans. I usually collar the larger pans so they bake up a bit past the edge, but smaller pans do it naturally without spilling over. Two layers, both slightly over two inches tall each, there's more than 4 inches already. Once the filling is in, you're near to five inches. Once you've iced it, you've reached the five inches tall, or passed it. Sometimes I torte and make all the pretty layers of icing and cake, but rarely.

AZCouture Posted 26 Feb 2014 , 12:23am
post #96 of 116

And collaring means to place strips of parchment paper around the inside ring of the pan, usually extending up past the top by an inch or two. Gives you a little more room to bake up, without spilling over.

rachelcak3s Posted 26 Feb 2014 , 12:24am
post #97 of 116

A[IMG ALT=""]http://cakecentral.com/content/type/61/id/3192745/width/350/height/700[/IMG] This caje has only 2 layers for each tier. I though it had okay height. How do you add a little more height with out adding a whole nother layer of cake wich could end up making it look way to big.

rachelcak3s Posted 26 Feb 2014 , 12:25am
post #98 of 116

AHehe theres a bulge in this too. It was my first 3 tier cake.

rachelcak3s Posted 26 Feb 2014 , 12:27am
post #99 of 116

AMy cakes dont go over the pan like that. Instead they dome and that makes me loose alot of height too

morganchampagne Posted 26 Feb 2014 , 12:29am
post #100 of 116

ATo fix the dome you can bake at a lower temp for longer...or use bake even strips. If you Google bake even.there's all kinds of duplicates you can make yourself...fixing the dome will solve the "height problem"

rachelcak3s Posted 26 Feb 2014 , 12:34am
post #101 of 116

AOkay ill check it out, thanks

thecakewitch Posted 26 Feb 2014 , 3:51am
post #102 of 116

Quote:

Originally Posted by AZCouture 
 

Standard 2" Magic Line pans. I usually collar the larger pans so they bake up a bit past the edge, but smaller pans do it naturally without spilling over. Two layers, both slightly over two inches tall each, there's more than 4 inches already. Once the filling is in, you're near to five inches. Once you've iced it, you've reached the five inches tall, or passed it. Sometimes I torte and make all the pretty layers of icing and cake, but rarely.

Sorry if this is off topic. I have never heard of not torting the cake before. Is this the standard? Are you all not torting? Am I the only one who torts all my cakes?:eek:

TheNerdyBaker Posted 26 Feb 2014 , 4:05am
post #103 of 116

Quote:

Originally Posted by thecakewitch 
 

Sorry if this is off topic. I have never heard of not torting the cake before. Is this the standard? Are you all not torting? Am I the only one who torts all my cakes?:eek:

 I always torte all of my cakes as well.  

 

Two standard cakes in 2" high pans results in a finished cake with 4 layers of cake and 3 layers of BC/filling.

 

I feel non-torted cakes are just too big a chunk of cake.

AZCouture Posted 26 Feb 2014 , 4:42am
post #104 of 116

I do sometimes, but usually no. I personally don't care for layers and layers of fillings. Just the right balance of cake and smbc. But I do believe the majority of people torte, so you're not alone.

lorieleann Posted 26 Feb 2014 , 5:19am
post #105 of 116

I bake the way AZCouture does with the collared pans, with two 2" cakes (though sometimes they end up more of 1 5/8", but then I do torte for four layers of cake and three layers of filling.  I don't like a huge amount of filling, so I keep the height of the fillings low. I end up with 4 3/4-5" tiers. 

thecakewitch Posted 26 Feb 2014 , 5:30am
post #106 of 116

AThank you, Nerdy, AZ, and Lorie. :-)

AnnieCahill Posted 26 Feb 2014 , 2:38pm
post #107 of 116

I don't torte either.  I do two layers of cake and a fatter layer of filling.  If I had an Agbay I might give it a whirl, but generally speaking I like a bigger ratio of cake to fillings and buttercream.

BeesKnees578 Posted 26 Feb 2014 , 2:54pm
post #108 of 116

I torte for wedding cakes (or any cake over 2 tiers) for a fancier looking presentation.

 

For party cakes, I don't.

 

Price them differently as well.  I am thinking of torting all and charging the same price across the board but worry that my loyal party cake customers will not be so appreciative!

BeesKnees578 Posted 26 Feb 2014 , 3:02pm
post #109 of 116

Quote:

Originally Posted by AnnieCahill 
 

I don't torte either.  I do two layers of cake and a fatter layer of filling.  If I had an Agbay I might give it a whirl, but generally speaking I like a bigger ratio of cake to fillings and buttercream.

Is an Agbay the layer cutter thingy?  

 

I used to never torte bc I would BUTCHER my cakes and couldn't cut my cakes straight all the way around.

 

Over the years, I just kept trying and now do it in a way that produces pretty consistent results.

 

I hold my long serrated knife as one should hold a knife and crook my pinky finger at a certain angle and while keeping my pinking firmly on the countertop, without changing the angle or moving the knife, I spin the cake around in a circle and deeply (1/4-1/2") score around the cake.  From there, I just keep turning the cake til I get all the way through.  

 

First I level the cake in same way, just keeping the pinky more extended.  Sounds odd, I suppose, but it works and I can do it pretty quickly now.

AnnieCahill Posted 26 Feb 2014 , 3:26pm
post #110 of 116

Quote:

Is an Agbay the layer cutter thingy? 

Yes.

 

Quote:

I used to never torte bc I would BUTCHER my cakes and couldn't cut my cakes straight all the way around. 

This is me.  LOL.

 

But I also just like more cake than filling I guess. I do tend to pile on the buttercream so like AZ said, I like to have a balance with everything.  I do like having three layers of cake and two layers of filling, but I don't have three of each pan size so I almost never do cakes like that (only for family).

as you wish Posted 26 Feb 2014 , 4:27pm
post #111 of 116

A

Original message sent by BeesKnees578

Is an Agbay the layer cutter thingy?  

I used to never torte bc I would BUTCHER my cakes and couldn't cut my cakes straight all the way around.

Over the years, I just kept trying and now do it in a way that produces pretty consistent results.

I hold my long serrated knife as one should hold a knife and crook my pinky finger at a certain angle and while keeping my pinking firmly on the countertop, without changing the angle or moving the knife, I spin the cake around in a circle and deeply (1/4-1/2") score around the cake.  From there, I just keep turning the cake til I get all the way through.  

First I level the cake in same way, just keeping the pinky more extended.  Sounds odd, I suppose, but it works and I can do it pretty quickly now.

This sounds like the same method I use; it works well for me! :) I hope this isn't terribly inappropriate, but I just have to show you what is being passed off as acceptable at the bakery in my town. This picture showed up in my newsfeed this morning from a friend entering to win something from this bakery on Facebook. Check out their nice even layers: [IMG]http://cakecentral.com/content/type/61/id/3193172/width/200/height/400[/IMG]

BeesKnees578 Posted 26 Feb 2014 , 7:04pm
post #112 of 116

Quote:

Originally Posted by as you wish 


This sounds like the same method I use; it works well for me! icon_smile.gif
I hope this isn't terribly inappropriate, but I just have to show you what is being passed off as acceptable at the bakery in my town. This picture showed up in my newsfeed this morning from a friend entering to win something from this bakery on Facebook. Check out their nice even layers:

Nice...since I love chocolate, I would be pretty irked!

JWinslow Posted 26 Feb 2014 , 7:35pm
post #113 of 116

Quote:

Originally Posted by as you wish 


This sounds like the same method I use; it works well for me! icon_smile.gif
I hope this isn't terribly inappropriate, but I just have to show you what is being passed off as acceptable at the bakery in my town. This picture showed up in my newsfeed this morning from a friend entering to win something from this bakery on Facebook. Check out their nice even layers:

 

The Agbay was a must for me - Even my husband said GET IT - LOL   Unless my cakes rise higher than the pan so I can run a knife across the top edge, I butcher it!  Oh how I butcher it - hahaha 
Now I use Agbay to level and torte when the cake call for it. - Very fast

Annabakescakes Posted 26 Feb 2014 , 9:18pm
post #114 of 116

A

Original message sent by as you wish

[quote name="BeesKnees578" url="/t/768464/am-i-good-enough/90#post_7488256"]Is an Agbay the layer cutter thingy?  

I used to never torte bc I would BUTCHER my cakes and couldn't cut my cakes straight all the way around.

Over the years, I just kept trying and now do it in a way that produces pretty consistent results.

I hold my long serrated knife as one should hold a knife and crook my pinky finger at a certain angle and while keeping my pinking firmly on the countertop, without changing the angle or moving the knife, I spin the cake around in a circle and deeply (1/4-1/2") score around the cake.  From there, I just keep turning the cake til I get all the way through.  

First I level the cake in same way, just keeping the pinky more extended.  Sounds odd, I suppose, but it works and I can do it pretty quickly now.

This sounds like the same method I use; it works well for me! :) I hope this isn't terribly inappropriate, but I just have to show you what is being passed off as acceptable at the bakery in my town. This picture showed up in my newsfeed this morning from a friend entering to win something from this bakery on Facebook. Check out their nice even layers: [IMG]http://cakecentral.com/content/type/61/id/3193172/width/200/height/400[/IMG][/quote]

Wow, that chocolate "layer" looks like it might be the hump cut off the top of the cake.

Before I got my agbay, I would lever against the top of the pan, and use a strong, fishing line, or dental floss to torte my cakes. Before separating, I would use a dab of buttercream to mark the layers so I would stack them back the way they came, since it wasn't perfect.

scrumdiddlycakes Posted 26 Feb 2014 , 9:27pm
post #115 of 116

There are so many tricks to getting layers even, it's just silly that cakes go out looking like that.
The first shop I worked at we would use cake drums in a pan, underneath the layer, to raise it above the top of the pan. Then rest the knife on the pan and slice through. Totally jury-rigged, haha, but they still came out even and didn't cost an extra cent.

MBalaska Posted 26 Feb 2014 , 10:24pm
post #116 of 116

I've started cutting the fondant covered cakes so there's 4 layers of cake and 3  layers of icing.  As there is so little icing outside, I put it inside.  I like icing.:P  But it's the Agbay that made this possible.

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%