kitchenchick Posted 11 Feb 2014 , 8:14pm
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AI've been using a MMF recipe with good success, however I needed to cover a 10" cake with black this last weekend, so I bought some black Satin Ice brand fondant. It was a disaster! Within minutes, it began to dry out and tear and get awful wrinkles. Before I had even finished smoothing it on the cake it was hardening. It just looked terrible. I tried smoothing over with Crisco, but it was like it wouldn't absorb at all and no effect on the "elephant skin" look. Granted, it is very cold and dry here, even with my whole house humidifier it's about 35% relative humidity in the kitchen. Does anyone have any advice in how to keep it from immediately drying out? I have another "tire" cake this week and am scared to try it again. I've called Satin Ice, but they have not gotten back to me yet. Anyone with experience with satin ice black??

5 replies
leah_s Posted 11 Feb 2014 , 9:20pm
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I used to keep it on hand at all times.  I'm not doing that many cakes any longer.  I was not above kneading in a little veg shortening, though.

maybenot Posted 12 Feb 2014 , 5:54am
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Black SI is often on the dry side.  I find that if I knead in some Duff's black [2/3 SI + 1/3 Duff's], I get something I really like.

 

Another option is to knead in some of your MMF. The SI is pretty saturated, so a 2/3 SI + 1/3 MMF wont' look much lighter.

kitchenchick Posted 13 Feb 2014 , 6:24pm
post #4 of

A

Original message sent by maybenot

Black SI is often on the dry side.  I find that if I knead in some Duff's black [2/3 SI + 1/3 Duff's], I get something I really like.

THANK YOU!!! I went and bought some Duffs and mixed it in and it worked beautifully! [IMG]http://cakecentral.com/content/type/61/id/3185762/width/200/height/400[/IMG]

maybenot Posted 14 Feb 2014 , 6:13am
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So glad it helped. 

 

The cake looks great--very clean & sharp.

asmita123 Posted 15 Feb 2014 , 9:45am
post #6 of

Hi,

 

One trick of professionals is to keep a light sugar syrup, known as simple syrup, close to hand. You can make your own by simmering 2 cups each of water and sugar for 10 minutes, then cooling it. Slice your cake in half horizontally, or slice the domed portion from the top, to open it up. Then sprinkle it liberally with simple syrup -- perfumed with rum, brandy or liqueur, if you like -- and assemble your cake. After sitting overnight, the moisture will be distributed through the cake and make it pleasantly moist.

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