Gluten Free Cakes

Decorating By AnimalGirl91 Updated 2 Apr 2014 , 8:35pm by Aliayzar

AnimalGirl91 Posted 8 Feb 2014 , 8:37am
post #1 of 10

AHi all, so I've posted a couple not to important questions recenyly but never really got a response ... so im hoping you guys will chime in this time.

Im opening a 100% gluten free bakery.there is absolutly no where in town for a celiac to buy a big safe gluten free cusyom cake. I have celiac disease and was baking alot of regular cake, although I never ate it being in the kitchen all the time landed me in the hospital with low iron count, damaged vili and a kidney infection. All from touching breathing and being around wheat flour. So my first point is to answer quite a few posts ive seen on here about people "trying out" gkuten free cakes for sale. If you are apealing to the alergy/celiac matket DONT!! a shared kitchen is all it takes and it can have devastating and painful effects. Its just food for thought.

my second question is for those who do infact bake gluten free, gluten free cake drys out and goes stale much quicker that regular cake. Will symple syrup keep this from happening? If not does anyone have any suggestions??

Thanks in advance guys

9 replies
mclaren Posted 8 Feb 2014 , 2:16pm
post #2 of 10

source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/food/2011/07/the-gluten-free-kitchen.shtml

 

 

"For an extra moist crumb add tapioca starch. It’s typically found in most gluten-free flour mixes. It gives cookies and cakes a chewier texture, and stops them drying out too quickly. But use it sparingly, say 25g/1oz for every 200g/7oz cornflour or rice flour, as it swells up with moisture and can make cakes slightly gummy if overused. "

MsGF Posted 9 Feb 2014 , 3:05pm
post #3 of 10

I too own and run a strictly GF Bakery.  Yes even with tapioca (which is all my cakes) they dry out faster and go stale quicker than non-GF.

 

Yes simple syrup does help, as does using ganache and covering cakes in fondant. It will hold in the moisture and goodness.

 

Buttercream works too but not for the length of time that ganache & fondant work.

 

I find cupcakes the worst.  they aren't even as nice the next day.  So when I do a cupcake order I bake and decorate the same day as pick up.

 

Good luck with your bakery.  And I agree 100% about baking GF and non-GF in the same bakery, not a good idea.  That is why I don't do it.  I don't want to risk my health or my customers health.

howboutbake Posted 10 Feb 2014 , 11:28am
post #4 of 10

Good luck!  My mom has celiac and it's so hard to find treats for her that aren't mass produced, bland, yuckiness.

 

I don't necessarily have an issue with people experimenting with gluten free products in their own kitchen as long as they inform the customer/family/friend that cross contamination is a very real possibility and if they are extremely sensitive to weigh the decision to eat the product carefully.  

 

For example, in my household, I have a severe allergy to eggs and oats, my father has an allergy to shellfish, and my mom has celiac and an allergy to sesame.  It would be nearly impossible to accommodate all of our needs without the tiniest bit of cross-contamination! :lol:  Not to mention most food labels now say "may contain every allergen known to man" 

 

I'm not supposed to touch eggs, but I glove up, and mask up if I use meringue powder and I live dangerously because I love to bake.  (Not safe, I wouldn't recommend it to anyone...I happen to be crazy, and yes, sometimes I pay a heavy price)

 

I think the dryness aspect comes with the celiac territory, which is why so many things like bread, muffins and the like are stored in the freezer.  Also, it appears the more successful gluten free efforts involve chocolate.  I don't know if that has a moisture retaining property, or if it's just a coincidence. 

MsGF Posted 10 Feb 2014 , 1:58pm
post #5 of 10

Quote:

Originally Posted by howboutbake 
 

 

I think the dryness aspect comes with the celiac territory, which is why so many things like bread, muffins and the like are stored in the freezer.  Also, it appears the more successful gluten free efforts involve chocolate.  I don't know if that has a moisture retaining property, or if it's just a coincidence. 

 

Most gluten-Free items are kept in the freezer to prolong shelf life.  It really has nothing to do with the dryness of Gf items.

 

But keeping GF baked goods at room temp or even in the fridge for a couple of days makes them stale quickly.  GF is hard to keep, so freezing is the best option.  

 

From my years of experience with Celiac and baking, chocolate can add a nice flavor but it doesn't  effect the moisture or staying power of GF baked goods.  But it does a good job of covering up the strong taste of some GF flours.

 

GF baking is getting better and better, so hopefully there will be something new and ground breaking coming around the corner to help with these problems.  That would be a blessing.

AnimalGirl91 Posted 11 Feb 2014 , 1:29am
post #6 of 10

AThanks guys for all your advise! Sorry to reply so late, still quite sick. Im hoping I can try out a few tricks. I did some GF baking yesterday, and wrapped the cake while still quite warm, my gosh was it devinly moist this morning!!!!

howboutbake Posted 11 Feb 2014 , 1:29am
post #7 of 10

AGreat to know! I agree gluten free has come a long way, and I think that's due in large part to the home bakers playing mad scientist out of sheer necessity. It's just awesome.

It also helps that it's a diet trend as well. Before people started going vegan, it was mighty difficult to find a decent egg free stuff too!

AnimalGirl91 Posted 11 Feb 2014 , 1:34am
post #8 of 10

AActually, the diet yhing for GF has and is making it increasingly harder. A person on a gf diet trend doesnt give 2 ****s about cross contamination and therefore give restaurants a faulse sense of success, "yay we didnt make this person sick" not realising this person does not have celiac and for example I would be very sick.

howboutbake Posted 12 Feb 2014 , 9:17pm
post #9 of 10

A

Original message sent by AnimalGirl91

Actually, the diet yhing for GF has and is making it increasingly harder. A person on a gf diet trend doesnt give 2 ****s about cross contamination and therefore give restaurants a faulse sense of success, "yay we didnt make this person sick" not realising this person does not have celiac and for example I would be very sick.

I should have clarified that I was talking about manufactured products and home baked goods...Haha don't even get me started on restaurants! My mom and I both hate going out to eat, and we've both gotten sick from restaurant food. I don't trust them as far as I can throw them!

Aliayzar Posted 2 Apr 2014 , 8:35pm
post #10 of 10

I know this is a bit late to reply, but one thing I found helps is using some honey in the actual cake. Honey is quite hygroscopic and seems to keep things a bit more moist just be sure you adjust your recipes accordingly.

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