CatrionaM Posted 3 Feb 2014 , 5:20am
post #1 of

Hi everyone.

I'm a total newbie. So please excuse the questions.

I decorated my brothers wedding cake a couple of months ago - it was my first ever cake decoration so was pretty nerve racking. My best friend is now getting married and has asked me to decorate her cake. My brothers cake was roses and orchids all peachy cream and whites, so I didn't have to worry about colouring my flowers and they didn't want any wire used at all.

 

 

 

My friend wants very colourful realistic flowers that trail on her cake so I would love some advice.

 

What is the difference in finish to either airbrush the flower or using petal dust then steaming?

 

Are you able to tell me what the difference to the techniques used for these two flowers might be? The first looks very soft and velvety (the look i am going for) and the second looks very glossy (a look my friend doesn't want).- I have read that the petal dust gets a sheen is the rose picture what that looks like? 

What would you think is the best way to get the first flower look.

 

And lastly -  I read somewhere that the tape contains latex. I know the bride is allergic do you think flowers sitting on the cake would be harmful? Is there an alternative tape to use?

 

Thank you all for your help

I look forward to being a member of this forum and getting to know you all.

 

 

 

 

 

 

11 replies
JWinslow Posted 3 Feb 2014 , 5:48am
post #2 of

Welcome to Cake Central!

 

I use petal dust on all my flowers.  I have better control and can achieve light and dark hues in small spaces.  The pink flowers in the picture are Japanese Wisteria.  I have a tutorial from Squires Magazine (somewhere) and I know the artist used petal dust.  The only time I get a sheen from dust is if I over steam them.  It doesn't take much to set the color.  Luster dust will give you a sheen also.

 

The wired stems of flowers should be placed in straws (I use cocktail straws or coffee stirrers) if you are going to put them in the cake.  The accepted rule is - no wires in cake :)

 

If your flowers are going to just be sitting on the cake (generally attached with royal icing or melted chocolate) you can cut the wire short and cover with back of the flower with fondant.  Because she has an allergy you don't want to take any chances, especially on her wedding day.

 

Sorry to write a book but, this is a start :)  I'm sure I didn't answer everything.

 

Jeanne

CatrionaM Posted 3 Feb 2014 , 9:30am
post #3 of

Hi Jeanne,

Thank you for such a nice welcome and helpful reply.

 

Yup no wire in the cake I was going to use a posy pick, it was just the wrapped wire with the floral tape I was worried about. Does anyone know if the tape does contain latex? Is there an alternative method because all the books/tutorials I have watched all use tape?

JWinslow Posted 3 Feb 2014 , 4:26pm
post #4 of

As far as I know, all floral tape contains latex.  I did a quick search for latex free floral tape and nothing came up so you might want to do another Google search.  Unless someone else chimes in with additional information I'd assume they all have latex. 

JWinslow Posted 3 Feb 2014 , 4:33pm
post #5 of

An alternative method is to make your flowers on skewers and gently twist them off when finished to dry in a former.  They are not wired flowers.  I see your dilemma, but not sure you are going to get the answers that will give you the look you want , however you have the time to practice making no wire flowers and still make them realistic as possible.

Not much help today, I'm afraid.

 

Jeanne

Dayti Posted 3 Feb 2014 , 5:36pm
post #6 of

ABut if you are taping your wired flowers, and inserting them in picks or straws, the latex concern should no longer be of concern, right? The tape won't be touching any edible part of the cake...

CatrionaM Posted 3 Feb 2014 , 5:54pm
post #7 of

Thank you for your reply JWinslow. the other cake I did had no wires and it looked nice So yes I can just do that.

Dayti I wanted to have flowers trailing like the Japanese Wisteria in the picture above. I had no idea about the latex in the tape it was just luck that i read that the tape had it in on a post here just before I joined otherwise I wouldn't have even thought of it.

Dayti Posted 3 Feb 2014 , 6:08pm
post #8 of

AOh I see, then yes, there is a risk that the tape may touch the cake. Unfortunately I don't have enough knowledge on allergies to give much advice, other than perhaps make the bride a separate 6" (or whatever size) cake that goes straight to the kitchen and ensure her slice is taken from there? Or if she is slicing and eating the cake with hubby in front of everyone, tell her to take a piece from the back that has had no flowers near it?

JWinslow Posted 3 Feb 2014 , 6:42pm
post #9 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dayti 

Oh I see, then yes, there is a risk that the tape may touch the cake. Unfortunately I don't have enough knowledge on allergies to give much advice, other than perhaps make the bride a separate 6" (or whatever size) cake that goes straight to the kitchen and ensure her slice is taken from there? Or if she is slicing and eating the cake with hubby in front of everyone, tell her to take a piece from the back that has had no flowers near it?

 

I like this idea!!  Bride gets latex free cake and the look she wants on the wedding cake.  Only drawback, and not a big one IMO, is during the cake cutting ceremony; but her slice could be slipped to the groom for "the feeding". 

sugarflorist Posted 3 Feb 2014 , 10:17pm

ASome time ago I contacted a foral tape manufacturer for my own purposes they confirmed that latex is used and said to there knowledge the product could not be made without it and were unaware of an alternative product with the same properties.

So I used crochet cotton and ribbon to form my flower sprays. It was not as efficient as flower tape but it did the job I needed it to.

Hope this helps in your situation

CatrionaM Posted 5 Feb 2014 , 12:14pm

Thank you all so much for your help. I have just spoken to the bride and she has decided not to risk it so i'm going to do it without wires.

I read about athletic tape being similar minus the latex but as I haven't used either I dont'know.

Thanks again for all your help.

pattibalceiro Posted 26 Mar 2014 , 12:20pm

I am very much allergies to latex. The latex gets into the air. I am going to try rolling my gum past using the thinnest setting on pasta roller then cut it through the flat noodle  cutter then apply gum glue and use that to wrap my wire. It can't hurt to try.

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