mariak Posted 3 Feb 2014 , 12:22am
post #1 of

I know, I know. Its a question about price!!:-X

 That being said, I have all of my base prices set and I know how much I need to charge for various extras. My problem is I have done cornelli lace before but never covering an entire 4 tier wedding cake before. CRINGE! My hand hurts just thinking about it! What I am wondering is how much more per serving do some of you charge for this. I am thinking nothing is going to be enough but I was just curious. Thanks

46 replies
morganchampagne Posted 3 Feb 2014 , 12:26am
post #2 of

AI can't say about price..but I'm wondering if your hand really hurts by the end of it if your royal icing might be just a bit too stiff?

mariak Posted 3 Feb 2014 , 12:36am
post #3 of

I have always had problems with my hands cramping and hurting when I do a lot of piping.

matthewkyrankelly Posted 3 Feb 2014 , 1:23am
post #4 of

Honestly, i don't charge any extra for cornelli lace.  It covers a multitude of sins and is really easy.  I can cover a cake in five minutes.  The whole thing would be done in under an hour with ten minute breaks in between layers.

 

This could easily be an "added value" item for the event. 

 

I would suggest you practice on a round to see how long it will really take you.

DeniseNH Posted 3 Feb 2014 , 1:25am
post #5 of

She might be right.  If you use standard American Buttercream, add a little bit of water or milk to it to soften it up.  I remember doing a lot of piping on a wedding cake and then ran upstairs to brush my teeth before delivering the cake and the toothbrush fell out of my hand............I couldn't hold onto it.  That's when I decided my icing was too stiff. 

morganchampagne Posted 3 Feb 2014 , 1:33am
post #6 of

A

Original message sent by mariak

I have always had problems with my hands cramping and hurting when I do a lot of piping.

Hi! I would really suggest thinning out your icing. I promise your hands don't have to hurt even if you don't do alot of piping :)

mariak Posted 3 Feb 2014 , 1:39am
post #7 of

Thanks everyone. I always thought my icing was fine but maybe it is too thick. I will try thinning it more. Thanks

morganchampagne Posted 3 Feb 2014 , 3:50am
post #8 of

ALet me know how it goes..sorry I couldn't help with your original question :( .

Unlimited Posted 3 Feb 2014 , 5:25am
post #9 of

If you mean this:

http://www.wilton.com/technique/Cornelli-Lace

not to be confused with this:

http://www.wilton.com/technique/Sotas

it's very intricate (preventing lines from touching) and somewhat time-consuming.

 

Since the entire cake will be piped with that technique, and no other decorations are required, I'd consider offering it at no additional charge on only two of the four tiers.  I'd suggest they choose another design on every other tier, or they pay an upcharge for the extra work on the remaining two tiers.  I can't tell you how much extra to charge (only you know how fast or slow you can pipe), but you'll regret it during the process when you realize you didn't charge enough.

Supermom35 Posted 4 Feb 2014 , 2:17am

Since the lace looks like a nice finishing touch I would charge an extra $100 at least. Plus like you said it does hurt your hand! Especially when you have multiple layers. 

DeliciousDesserts Posted 4 Feb 2014 , 2:22am

A

Original message sent by matthewkyrankelly

Honestly, i don't charge any extra for cornelli lace.  It covers a multitude of sins and is really easy. 

SPCOhio Posted 4 Feb 2014 , 2:24am

A

Original message sent by Supermom35

Since the lace looks like a nice finishing touch I would charge an extra $100 at least. Plus like you said it does hurt your hand! Especially when you have multiple layers. 

Have you done cornelli before, Supermom? How do you decide how far apart the piping should be placed? What size tip do you use? What size bag?

Supermom35 Posted 4 Feb 2014 , 2:28am

I use the disposable bag with a size 2  or 3 tip. Depending on how big the cake is. The first time I did it I actually didn't measure anything and it came out perfect. The next time I did it I measured and did the whole nine and it didn't look as good. I think this technique requires you to be relaxed because this can easily get messed up. Try not to let the laces touch, the design is not creating anything in particular. It is just random lines that look like a design but really aren't. 

SPCOhio Posted 4 Feb 2014 , 2:33am

ADo you have a picture you can share of how it came out?

mariak Posted 4 Feb 2014 , 2:35am

This is the cake she wants. I am trying to look close and from what I can tell none of the lines are touching. I know it isn't difficult, just time consuming!

Supermom35 Posted 4 Feb 2014 , 2:41am

Sure! Here it is! Good luck!

SPCOhio Posted 4 Feb 2014 , 2:47am

A

Original message sent by Supermom35

I use the disposable bag with a size 2  or 3 tip. Depending on how big the cake is. The first time I did it I actually didn't measure anything and it came out perfect. The next time I did it I measured and did the whole nine and it didn't look as good. I think this technique requires you to be relaxed because this can easily get messed up. Try not to let the laces touch, the design is not creating anything in particular. It is just random lines that look like a design but really aren't. 

But which disposable bag? I'm interested in knowing both size and brand because I wonder if having a smaller bag is better than a bigger one and if there is a difference between how the bags handle to make it easier on the hands? And what kind of icing? Royal? ABC? SMBc? IMBC?

SPCOhio Posted 4 Feb 2014 , 3:18am

AWell look at that. Supermom35 just disappeared and took her cornelli blue heart with her. :)

mariak Posted 4 Feb 2014 , 3:41am

Umm... Okay...??? Did I miss something?

cakeyouverymuch Posted 4 Feb 2014 , 3:46am

Quote:

Originally Posted by SPCOhio 

Well look at that. Supermom35 just disappeared and took her cornelli blue heart with her. icon_smile.gif

 

 

Guess we should thank a MOD.

kkmcmahan Posted 4 Feb 2014 , 3:59am

When I have did this technique I thinned the RI with corn syrup.  It gives elasticity to the RI and makes it easier to do the cornelli lace.  Will definitely save on your hands!

cakeyouverymuch Posted 4 Feb 2014 , 4:30am

Quote:

Originally Posted by kkmcmahan 
 

When I have did this technique I thinned the RI with corn syrup.  It gives elasticity to the RI and makes it easier to do the cornelli lace.  Will definitely save on your hands!

 

I've also read that a bit of glycerine has the same effect.

ellavanilla Posted 4 Feb 2014 , 9:46pm

back to the OP about pricing, i agree that normally I wouldn't charge more for the cornelli pattern, but the lace in that photo is so much more elaborate than typical cornelli cakes. wouldn't you agree?

 

i think i would bump up the price a bit. 10 cents a serving?

 

Jen

costumeczar Posted 4 Feb 2014 , 9:50pm

Quote:

Originally Posted by matthewkyrankelly 
 

Honestly, i don't charge any extra for cornelli lace.  It covers a multitude of sins and is really easy.  I can cover a cake in five minutes.  The whole thing would be done in under an hour with ten minute breaks in between layers.

 

 

Oh yes...this is so true.

morganchampagne Posted 5 Feb 2014 , 12:40am

AIt could just be my phone..but what is going on with that lace...it looks like its textured or something? That might be worth the price increase

CindiM Posted 5 Feb 2014 , 12:52am

I would give the customer a choice.  I can make it look like that with a tiny cornelli design for $20 (or more) per tier or I can put a larger cornelli lace on the cake for $10 (or more) per tier. 

 

Let the customer decide.  I've had customers say, well then just skip it!  At least you are getting paid for your work and your time. 

kblickster Posted 5 Feb 2014 , 12:55am

Quote:

Originally Posted by morganchampagne 

It could just be my phone..but what is going on with that lace...it looks like its textured or something? That might be worth the price increase

I agree that it look textured.  It doesn't look like just piped cornelli lace.  I can't figure it out.

shellic63 Posted 5 Feb 2014 , 1:57am

Yeah, it doesn't look like cornelli lace to me either. It looks more like sotas. It's hard to see a good close up of the pic.

gscout73 Posted 5 Feb 2014 , 8:23am

Quote:

Originally Posted by Unlimited 
 

If you mean this:

http://www.wilton.com/technique/Cornelli-Lace

not to be confused with this:

http://www.wilton.com/technique/Sotas

it's very intricate (preventing lines from touching) and somewhat time-consuming.

 

Since the entire cake will be piped with that technique, and no other decorations are required, I'd consider offering it at no additional charge on only two of the four tiers.  I'd suggest they choose another design on every other tier, or they pay an upcharge for the extra work on the remaining two tiers.  I can't tell you how much extra to charge (only you know how fast or slow you can pipe), but you'll regret it during the process when you realize you didn't charge enough.

You have the descriptions backwards. The Cornelli does not touch or cross over, the Sotas is just a squiggly mess.

Unlimited Posted 5 Feb 2014 , 6:29pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by gscout73 
 

You have the descriptions backwards. The Cornelli does not touch or cross over, the Sotas is just a squiggly mess.

No, you're reading it wrong... I guess I should have used a comma after "Sotas" or used parentheses like this:

 

"If you mean this: http://www.wilton.com/technique/Cornelli-Lace (not to be confused with this: http://www.wilton.com/technique/Sotas), it's very intricate (preventing lines from touching) and somewhat time-consuming."

 

If you omit the extra thought, it's one sentence -- exactly what I meant to say.  Does it make sense now?

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