Glycerin In Scratch Cake Recipes???

Baking By Danilou Updated 31 Jan 2015 , 1:16am by Nancylou

Danilou Posted 26 Jan 2014 , 2:48am
post #1 of 24

Hi,

I've heard about using glycerin in baking. I found this YouTube clip from Sweet wise

 


 

In the video description she gives amounts of glycerin

 

For every 500 grams, or roughly 1.1 pounds of flour or other dry ingredients, use 1 tsp glycerin.

For Fondant: Add 2-3tsp of Glycerin to 2 pounds of rolled fondant to help keep it smooth and avoid cracking.

 

Apparently the glycerin can help keep a scratch cake moist for longer. This is exciting, although my chocolate cakes stay moist for up to a week, some of my vanilla cakes don't stay moist for very long.

 

Has anyone used glycerin in their scratch cake recipes? If so what result do you get?

I've already done a search on c.c with not a huge amount of topics on this.

23 replies
SPCOhio Posted 26 Jan 2014 , 3:26am
post #2 of 24

AThat makes sense, really. Glycerin is a humectant, so it should attract water and hold it in the cake's batter. I know Michelle Foster's fondant recipe calls for glycerin which many claim adds to its pliability. It's worth a shot, isn't it?!

Danilou Posted 26 Jan 2014 , 12:53pm
post #3 of 24

Thankyou, I love her fondant, do you make the updated version? And have you tried the chocolate recipe? If so would you use 70% cocoa dark chocolate for a more chocolate flavour?

SPCOhio Posted 26 Jan 2014 , 3:11pm
post #4 of 24

AI have made it, but only three times. The first time was a success, the second time I think I let my gelatin bloom too long and I ended up with a crumby mess, and the last time it was so rigid it was like rolling out a rubber tire. I think the problem this time was that I used heavy cream, but I am not certain. I picked up some whole milk to give it another go tomorrow. I haven't made the chocolate version, but when I do try it, I will probably not use a 70% cacao chocolate unless I am making it for a true chocolate lover. I think the chocolate flavor might be a little aggressive, at least for people who are accustomed to boxes cakes and icings. They seem to have a hard time adjusting to scratch food. I have been making my ganache with a 54% cacao chocolate bar lately because people found my good Scharfenberger's to be too powerful!

Danilou Posted 26 Jan 2014 , 10:40pm
post #5 of 24

AThankyou for the info..

auzzi Posted 28 Jan 2014 , 10:00pm
post #6 of 24

Quote:

Apparently the glycerin can help keep a scratch cake moist for longer.

 

Everything old is new again. Adding glycerine to cake batters was not unknown or unusual in days gone by. More "modern" chemicals perform the same function in commercial cake batters nowdays, while home bakers, over time, have left it out of "modern" recipes ..

 

A home-help baking tip from a Australian baker in 1916:

A teaspoonful of glycerine added to a pound of flour used in bread and cake-making is a great improvement, for not only with tho dough be softer, but the cake or loaf will keep longer.

Danilou Posted 28 Jan 2014 , 10:36pm
post #7 of 24

Thankyou, when I finally try it I'll post the results.

guinever26 Posted 3 Mar 2014 , 11:20pm
post #8 of 24

A

Original message sent by Danilou

Thankyou, when I finally try it I'll post the results.

I'm just wondering what's the result of your cake. Thanks!

Danilou Posted 3 Mar 2014 , 11:24pm
post #9 of 24

AI've only had the opportunity to try it once for cupcakes. They seemed to stay moist. I need to experiment with this a bit more. Try the recipe with and without glycerine to notice if there is any difference. I wouldn't use this for my chocolate cake as it is already very moist

MBalaska Posted 4 Mar 2014 , 3:01am
post #10 of 24

Quote:

Originally Posted by auzzi 
 
Quote:
Apparently the glycerin can help keep a scratch cake moist for longer.

 

Everything old is new again. Adding glycerine to cake batters was not unknown or unusual in days gone by. More "modern" chemicals perform the same function in commercial cake batters nowdays, while home bakers, over time, have left it out of "modern" recipes ..

 

A home-help baking tip from a Australian baker in 1916:

A teaspoonful of glycerine added to a pound of flour used in bread and cake-making is a great improvement, for not only with tho dough be softer, but the cake or loaf will keep longer.

 

That's interesting auzzi.  Thanks for sharing.

natt12321 Posted 4 Mar 2014 , 9:28am
post #11 of 24

AI use glycerine in my vanilla and lemon cakes for exactly the reason you mentioned. My vanilla cake is still moist up to 2 weeks after baking I am told.

Gerle Posted 4 Mar 2014 , 9:58pm
post #12 of 24

This sounds really interesting, but most cakes don't call for a pound of flour, so am assuming you would have to reduce the glycerine according to the amount of flour used in the recipe.  And does this only work with AP flour, or will it also work with cake flour and/or self rising?

natt12321 Posted 4 Mar 2014 , 10:14pm
post #13 of 24

AThe recipe I use has 52g glycerine to 700g flour but the recipe calls for the glycerine, I wouldn't go adding that much to just any recipe unless you are subbing out another liquid.

Once you add a leavening agent to AP flour it is no different to any other leavening flour in principle so I can't see why you couldn't add it to any recipe really.

Lizzybug78 Posted 5 Mar 2014 , 10:59am
post #14 of 24

How strange. My stall was next to an ex-bakers' at a wedding fair last weekend, and he said the same thing but with glucose. I wonder if they're interchangeable for this purpose?

lisa2248 Posted 6 Mar 2014 , 2:41pm
post #15 of 24

AI have a bottle of glycerine that I used some for making huge bubbles. I read the label and it does say for use as a sweetner and preservative, but then there is a warning about eye contact and overdosing. I also tasted it and it has a bad after taste. I have a white cake I need to make ahead of time so I can cover w/ fondant and not be rushed but am worried about it drying out. so is glycerine a good idea?

natt12321 Posted 6 Mar 2014 , 4:53pm
post #16 of 24

A

Original message sent by lisa2248

I have a bottle of glycerine that I used some for making huge bubbles. I read the label and it does say for use as a sweetner and preservative, but then there is a warning about eye contact and overdosing. I also tasted it and it has a bad after taste. I have a white cake I need to make ahead of time so I can cover w/ fondant and not be rushed but am worried about it drying out. so is glycerine a good idea?

my cake has lots of glycerine in it and so I can vouch for it not causing an aftertaste in the cake (ive used it for a cough in the past though and I know what you mean about the aftertaste!) But adding a bit of glycerine should help the cake from drying out so yes I think it could be a good idea.

Danilou Posted 8 Mar 2014 , 5:21am
post #17 of 24

A

Original message sent by lisa2248

I have a bottle of glycerine that I used some for making huge bubbles. I read the label and it does say for use as a sweetner and preservative, but then there is a warning about eye contact and overdosing. I also tasted it and it has a bad after taste. I have a white cake I need to make ahead of time so I can cover w/ fondant and not be rushed but am worried about it drying out. so is glycerine a good idea?

Danilou Posted 8 Mar 2014 , 5:23am
post #18 of 24

AWas this food grade glycerine? Because there is a difference. I believe the pharmaceutical grade glycerine to be more bitter and not intended to be used in food.

natt12321 Posted 8 Mar 2014 , 9:52am
post #19 of 24

A

Original message sent by Danilou

Was this food grade glycerine? Because there is a difference. I believe the pharmaceutical grade glycerine to be more bitter and not intended to be used in food.

I use pharmacy glycerine because the different between 'pharmacy' and 'food' grade is whether the intention is that it is to be ingested. Glycerine sold for the purpose of only being applied to the skin is not food safe, but glycerine sold for use for coughs is food grade.

SweetTreatsxXx Posted 4 Jan 2015 , 7:00pm
post #20 of 24

I have been using Glycerin in my cakes for the last few years & really noticed the difference.  I am always being asked by customers, friends & family how comes my cakes are so moist. Plus you get the added bonus of the cake staying fresh for longer... I would highly recommend fellow cake bakers to give it a try I promise you will never bake another cake with out adding this little bit of what I call magic to your cakes.

I found this little bit of magic in some of my late Nan`s recipes who was one of the best cooks I know... & then I put it to the test & used it in a cake I made for a lady at my place of work and came home with 6 cake orders that day.... I always looked up to my Nan.... & I believe she is looking down on me & watching my little cake business thrive.. Just wish she was here to share it all with me & my daughter. 

Happy Baking All & A Fab 2015 x :-):D

MBalaska Posted 4 Jan 2015 , 8:25pm
post #21 of 24

Quote:

Originally Posted by Danilou 
 

"........Apparently the glycerin can help keep a scratch cake moist for longer. This is exciting, although my chocolate cakes stay moist for up to a week, some of my vanilla cakes don't stay moist for very long.

 

Has anyone used glycerin in their scratch cake recipes? If so what result do you get?

I've already done a search on c.c with not a huge amount of topics on this."

 

Yes, I put it in my scratch Butter cake recipe. The first cake I put in just one teaspoon to try it, the second cake I put in two teaspoons.  It was very moist and stayed nice for longer. I've added it to my recipe so it will be a normal ingredient now.  this is the only scratch recipe that I make that tends to dry out slightly in a few days, problem solved.

 

2 - 8" or 2 - 9" rounds

 

6 oz.   BUTTER  (soft)  

13 oz. SUGAR    (gran.)

2 teaspoons GLYCERINE

 

      Beat together for five (5) mins. On Med.

 

4    EGGS    (lg.)

2 tsps. VANILLA  EXTRACT        

 

      Add: & beat on low for a few seconds to combine. Scrape bowl.  Beat on Med. 3 mins.

 

9 oz.    FLOUR A.P.    (sifted)

¾ tsp. BAKING POWDER

½ tsp. SALT

 

      Sift flour in bowl, add BP & Salt. Stir with whisk.

 

½ cup SOUR CREAM  

½ cup WHOLE MILK  

 

Add flour alternately with milk & sour cream. On Low.

1/3 flour,   milk,   1/3 flour,  sour cream,  1/3 flour.

 

Mix on medium for two minutes. 

Bake at 350 until done, start checking at 15 mins.

Nancylou Posted 29 Jan 2015 , 6:40am
post #22 of 24

Thank you so much for sharing your recipe MBalaska and thank your for letting me pick your brains a bit through PM's. 

 

I ended up testing three of my favorite yellow cake recipes as well as MBalaska's recipe, all using a different type of flour or flour combination.  I then added approximately 1 tsp. of glycerin per 125 grams of flour.

 

Cake one, I used cake flour only, cake two I used a combination of cake flour and AP flour, cake three was AP flour only, and cake four was gluten free flour.  While the first two were winners fresh out of the oven and on day two, the AP flour cake (MBalaska's recipe) was the clear winner on day 5, it was so moist and delicious.  The cake flour recipes were both very dry.  The gluten free flour cake also stayed reasonably moist, surprising for GF flour. 

 

I have just printed and inserted MBalaska's recipe into my scratch recipe book and it is now my go-to yellow cake recipe.  I can't thank you enough.

 

Nancy

MBalaska Posted 29 Jan 2015 , 9:24am
post #23 of 24

@Nancylou It's great to know that it worked as well for you as it did for me. Half the time I want to eat all of the batter with a spoon before it gets near the oven.  Much success in your business.:party:

Nancylou Posted 31 Jan 2015 , 1:16am
post #24 of 24

Quote:

Originally Posted by MBalaska 
 

@Nancylou It's great to know that it worked as well for you as it did for me. Half the time I want to eat all of the batter with a spoon before it gets near the oven.  Much success in your business.:party:


For me, it was after the oven  ... fork + cake = heaven, no icing needed.  Thanks again MB.

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