Getting Back On The Horse - Motivation After An Illness.

Decorating By kblickster Updated 26 Jan 2014 , 7:33pm by kblickster

kblickster Posted 19 Jan 2014 , 3:03pm
post #1 of 14

Having a hard time getting motivated after a long illness.  I've got a wonderful baker friend that has taken over and baked for me, but it's time to get back on the horse.

 

I've got a wedding cake, a birthday cake and a retirement cake and I've done all the prep work including cleaning all my equipment, but I have yet to turn the oven on.

 

Part of it is that I am still not 100% but I guess I'm just a little scared.

 

Anyone else out there experience this?

13 replies
kblickster Posted 19 Jan 2014 , 4:36pm
post #2 of 14

I finally got started on the wedding cake.  Not excited at all about these cakes though and I sure hope I get in the groove before I have to start decorating these things.

 

I even bought a Craftsy class last night that I couldn't afford in order to motivate me and that didn't even do it.

 

Got out my new Agbay that I got for Christmas that had not even been opened and thought it would inspire me.  Not.

-K8memphis Posted 19 Jan 2014 , 4:42pm
post #3 of 14

yes i have experience with this--obviously your whole self goes through the illness--even though it was just your leg or stomach or whatever that got all the treatment--all the other parts of you have been neglected and they have to heal and catch up too--doesn't all happen at the same time, some parts never catch up--try to be understanding of these divergent health levels but don't put up with no lip from them either--

 

it's quite a harsh reality to be prevented from pursuing your life due to health limits--it's normal to be concerned and scared to get back to it--'what ifs' abound--

 

as a decorator one of our strengths is the ability to pump out plan A then if that fizzles plan B then that fizzles and we pump out plan C, plan D, etc. so set up a back up plan just to help you feel more secure--keep your baker on speed dial--have someone you can call in real quick for moral support --relieve some of the pressure--suck it up--make up some icing and filling, prepare some pans and flip on the oven--go easy but go steady at the pace you're comfortable with now--as they say 'you've got a new normal'-- enjoy it-- no, relish it -- count your blessings-- 

 

you know you love to bake and decorate--dive in--feel the oven heat--take a deep breath and cough cough cough up that airborne powder from the whirring mixer, grieve the pile of dirty dishes, wash your hands for the thousandth time, crack the eggs, smell the smells, twirl the turntable, set the timers, ring the bells, you're ba-ack!

 

sugarflorist Posted 19 Jan 2014 , 4:42pm
post #4 of 14

i understand where you are coming from - All of my cakes are very simply iced withe the detailed decoration being things that can be made in advance so far i have never missed a deadline. 

 

 because of disability i cant stand for very long and experience extreme low energy and chronic pain. My cake designs sort of reflect that. If it is a fruit cake then i can put in the time over a longer period. But sponge cakes because of the shelf life are different.

 

I use a lot of sugar flowers because they are a sitting down occupation and can be made in advance  

 

i also use ri run-outs - again a sitting occupation. base relief too. and pastillage work

 

I find that my customers are happy to accept suggestions that make my life easier but still fill their expectations.I just have to be more prepared more organised with my time and occasionally ask for help with delivery and staging So untill you are back up to par just work within you ability and chose your techniques so that you can work ahead of deadlines. the hardest job for me is the covering of a sponge cake with fondant because it has to be done last minuet it really zaps my energy.  

howsweet Posted 19 Jan 2014 , 6:16pm
post #5 of 14

I hope I'm not over stepping..

 

Have you considered this lack of motivation may be depression? A long illness is just the kind of thing that can result in depression. The illness being over doesn't necessarily mean the depression will magically lift. Not being sure your body is ready wouldn't help and depending on what you went through and how long, there could even be an PTSD aspect.

 

I'm not one to jump on the antidepressant wagon, but if you think this could be a factor, there's no reason not to try some curcumin (apparently shown in one study to be as effective as prozac, but it's just a more of a strong antioxidant) and some high quality DHA or fish oil, which is wonderful brain food (like Nordic Naturals which is independently tested for mercury) and regular exercise, if possible.

 

Anyway, my heart goes out to you. You'll climb this mountain, even though you may be tired of mountains.

kblickster Posted 19 Jan 2014 , 7:49pm
post #6 of 14

Not overstepping at all.  I am a go-getter and getting so sick really threw me for a loop.  My body and mind has suffered.  Not being able to do anything for so long has me weak in mind and spirit.

 

Thanks for the support and suggestions.  I'm not the type to whine, and I'm usually the one people turn to for support.  I don't like being on the other end and I suppose I need to talk more to my friends and family about how this has affected me.

celiazumbach Posted 20 Jan 2014 , 10:24pm
post #7 of 14

AThank you ladies for your words of encouragement. I have just had 2 difficult years nursing my acutely depressed husband. During that time I used my cake decorating as my outlet spending many hours in a cake decoratorating trance doing cakes for family and friends only. Now he is much better I feel burned out and am experiencing the same as kblickster. My get up and go has got up and gone. I have no doubt the energy will come back. I will turn on the oven and bake a cake, smell the smell of knowing that the cake is cooked without checking it during it's baking time. That's a good start. Thank you again.

MBalaska Posted 21 Jan 2014 , 8:16am
post #8 of 14

January is the awfulest month of the year so hang in there. Look in your cake book at the beautiful things that you've already accomplished and set out small goals, by writing them down.  Big check marks when you finish each step.  Good Luck.

kblickster Posted 26 Jan 2014 , 3:22pm
post #9 of 14

Thanks for all your support.  Was able to get through 2 of my cake orders yesterday.  So happy to have them done and safely delivered.

 

http://cakecentral.com/g/i/3174024/a/3445563/14-12-9-6-inch-tiers-buttercream-icing/

http://cakecentral.com/g/i/3174026/a/3445569/8-6-inch-square-chocolate-with-chocolate-buttercream/

-K8memphis Posted 26 Jan 2014 , 3:29pm
post #10 of 14

so if you found some motivation--drop me some bread crumbs and i will follow in your pathway --lol

 

your cakes are awesome--chocolate groom's no problem-o

 

i love the bride's cake the contrast of pearls to black ribbon with the twist--such a stunner design so well done

 

she's ba-ack

liz at sugar Posted 26 Jan 2014 , 4:05pm
post #11 of 14

Love your treatment of the ribbon on that cake!  Very lovely!

 

Liz

kazita Posted 26 Jan 2014 , 4:33pm
post #12 of 14

ABeautiful work....love the look of that wedding cake

celiazumbach Posted 26 Jan 2014 , 7:23pm
post #13 of 14

AYou have inspired me with your beautiful cakes. They are stunning. Did you enjoy doing them. I did a simple Harry Potter cake, I enjoyed doing it but felt totally spent after I had finished. It was a good start.

kblickster Posted 26 Jan 2014 , 7:33pm
post #14 of 14

I did enjoy doing them celiazumbach.  There's nothing like the feeling I get when I finally get the cake delivered and set up.  First, enormous relief and then pride in a job well done.  I was totally exhausted though and very thankful that I don't own a bakery and have to start all over again on Monday.

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