Is This The New Disco Dust?

Decorating By dannic Updated 27 Jan 2015 , 2:39am by maybenot

dannic Posted 4 Jan 2014 , 12:40am
post #1 of 26

HELLO!!!!

I was surfing the Internet the other day and came across something rather disturbing....

We all know about disco dust. And how some use it even though its made with plastic. And how Pinterest brainwashes everyone into believing all the cake things like the sharpie pinstripe and using hot glue guns to apply thing blah blah blah.

But this is what I found.... Geeez luise. What's next?! 

is this for real?

25 replies
Norasmom Posted 4 Jan 2014 , 1:10am
post #2 of 26

could be edible gold leaf.

dannic Posted 4 Jan 2014 , 2:24am
post #3 of 26

nahhh what's the difference between the glitter on those cakepops and this 

http://images.toms.com/media/catalog/product/cache/1/side/900x640/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/w/-/w-gold-glitters-classics-s-su12_1.jpg

i dont see much of a difference..... 

scrumdiddlycakes Posted 4 Jan 2014 , 3:22am
post #4 of 26

No, that's not gold leaf, that's craft glitter... which is disco dust, just bigger, lol.
Someone had sparkly poo! 

Norasmom Posted 4 Jan 2014 , 3:37am
post #5 of 26

Quote:

Originally Posted by dannic 
 

nahhh what's the difference between the glitter on those cakepops and this 

http://images.toms.com/media/catalog/product/cache/1/side/900x640/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/w/-/w-gold-glitters-classics-s-su12_1.jpg

i dont see much of a difference..... 

The Toms probably taste better.

dannic Posted 4 Jan 2014 , 5:08am
post #6 of 26

do you think people actually eat that? i wouldnt even if I didnt have a CLUE about anything cake related. I'd call their bluff when i have flash backs of elementary school and how that stuff sticks to everything.

imagine what it sticks to inside of you..... :eek:

Annabakescakes Posted 4 Jan 2014 , 7:05am
post #7 of 26

AYou would need a salt water cleanse after eating that thing. It would be stuck all.over your insides, for sure. Yuck.

Godot Posted 4 Jan 2014 , 7:13am
post #8 of 26

AOh ick.

dannic Posted 4 Jan 2014 , 7:28am
post #9 of 26

eww, imagine the texture of those things in your mouth. like, disco dust as it is tastes plasticy, it has that weird crunchy texture that doesnt break in your mouth if you chew it. But this..... how could you bite into it, realize that it's not dissolving, and still swallow!!!!

Norasmom Posted 4 Jan 2014 , 5:26pm
post #10 of 26

If you do a search for glittered cake pops on Pinterest, it's like pure Christmas ornaments  Bakers are the wiser…consumers are not.  Kinda scary.

scrumdiddlycakes Posted 4 Jan 2014 , 5:48pm
post #11 of 26

AI have to assume those are for show or blog purposes only. That's my big issue with interest, so much is done solely for a pretty photo.

AZCouture Posted 4 Jan 2014 , 5:54pm
post #12 of 26

AThat's what I'm thinking Scrum, purely for a pretty photo, NOT to promote food.

AZCouture Posted 4 Jan 2014 , 5:55pm
post #13 of 26

ABut for God's sake, if it's not, that is not cool!

MimiFix Posted 4 Jan 2014 , 6:27pm
post #14 of 26

The glitter line gets more blurried all the time... Many consumers assume that if it's glitter-on-food, then it's edible. Sadly, many bakers don't care. I've heard too many students who say things like, "It doesn't matter, that stuff ain't gonna kill ya."

scrumdiddlycakes Posted 4 Jan 2014 , 6:47pm
post #15 of 26

AGrr, I HATE that line! How many things did people do for years, only to find out it actually was killing people later on?! Sorry to stray, but as a new mom, you wouldn't believe how often I hear things like, "I did this for all of my kids, and they turned out just fine," when it's something proven to be unhealthy and/or dangerous.

Bakers using inedible products on there baking, without providing the client with the knowledge of that, should be put out of business, and fined. Especially when there are conditions where eating small bits of plastic could land individuals in the hospital, or worse.

gah, I need coffee, I'm ranting again.

Annabakescakes Posted 4 Jan 2014 , 7:17pm
post #16 of 26

Quote:

Originally Posted by scrumdiddlycakes 

Grr, I HATE that line!
How many things did people do for years, only to find out it actually was killing people later on?!
Sorry to stray, but as a new mom, you wouldn't believe how often I hear things like, "I did this for all of my kids, and they turned out just fine," when it's something proven to be unhealthy and/or dangerous.

Bakers using inedible products on there baking, without providing the client with the knowledge of that, should be put out of business, and fined. Especially when there are conditions where eating small bits of plastic could land individuals in the hospital, or worse.

gah, I need coffee, I'm ranting again.

Oh, I believe how many times you hear it, I have heard it over and over for my kids too. Smoking while pregnant, driving while holding baby, rice in the bottle...

Can you just see the plastic lodged in the colon? Ick, ick, ick...

Faradaye Posted 4 Jan 2014 , 9:29pm
post #17 of 26

AI'm going to cover my next cake in glomesh.

It'll look awesome!

(Customer will have to supply own hacksaw for cutting purposes.)

costumeczar Posted 4 Jan 2014 , 11:40pm
post #18 of 26

AI spend a lot of time explaining to brides that things on pinterest aren't real.

dannic Posted 5 Jan 2014 , 4:23am
post #19 of 26

I'm new to baking, and for the first couple months, i didnt spend much time on the beloved cake central... i admit i have used disco dust before, before i knew what it was made out of. i used it on my birthday cake, in sparse amounts, mainly on the cake board... but now that i know that it's bad, i'm thinking of ways that i can use my disco dust, my very expensive plastic.... to decorate things that i wont be ingesting.

why does pinterest have to lie!? but that makes me wonder what other things they put in our heads....

we aren't safe anywhere! 

scrumdiddlycakes Posted 5 Jan 2014 , 4:28am
post #20 of 26

AI use a glitter I order from the UK that is truly edible, and use disco dust on things like gumpaste figures and flowers, and tell clients they are for appearance only. Even with that though, I'm careful its not going to fall off said figure onto cake.

cupcakemaker Posted 5 Jan 2014 , 9:17am
post #21 of 26

A

Original message sent by scrumdiddlycakes

I use a glitter I order from the UK that is truly edible, and use disco dust on things like gumpaste figures and flowers, and tell clients they are for appearance only. Even with that though, I'm careful its not going to fall off said figure onto cake.

Would you mind telling me what? I'm in the uk and haven't found a good one yet!

dannic Posted 5 Jan 2014 , 9:18am
post #22 of 26

Quote:

Originally Posted by cupcakemaker 


Would you mind telling me what? I'm in the uk and haven't found a good one yet!

yes! super interested in finding out!

:princess:

maybenot Posted 26 Jan 2015 , 3:47am
post #23 of 26

Not sure what is being ordered from the UK, but Rainbow Dusts are the most visible.  Be aware, they offer 2 lines, The Edible Range and Sparkle Range. 

 

The Sparkle Range IS NOT EDIBLE.  They use the term: approved for contact with food.  This just means that it can touch food and not render the food toxic or inedible.  It is plastic and not meant to be eaten. It is NOT "food grade", it is merely OK if there is incidental ingestion.  It is NOT intended to be sprinkled on food or eaten in ANY quantity, no matter how minute.  It's the same as any US disco dust product you'll run across.

 

The Edible Range IS edible.  It's [finely ground] gum arabic cake sparkles, readily available in the US.  You can buy the larger flakes and grind them thru a tea strainer with the handle of a knife.  You can even make your own in custom colors with this recipe:

http://www.lindyscakes.co.uk/2011/08/08/making-edible-metallic-glitter-a-recipe/

 

Lizzybug78 Posted 26 Jan 2015 , 10:33pm
post #24 of 26

AFirst off, I should say I don't use the plastic glitter, just before I get lynched for the next bit :-D

I personally don't see the problem with ingesting a bit of non toxic glitter - hell, when my kids were little I reckon I accidentally inhaled a ton of the stuff. It's like sweetcorn kernels, we can't digest them either, they just pass straight through. I'm far more concerned about hydrogenated fat than glitter!

That said, I would never use it on a customers cake as it's my choice if I want to chance it on a personal item, but that's not a choice I'd ask them to make, so it's just not an option.

So, my question is, how do choccywoccydoodah get away with plastering their cakes with what looks very much like plastic glitter, on pieces that really don't look like they're going to be removed?

costumeczar Posted 27 Jan 2015 , 12:08am
post #25 of 26

Right, for most people it's not a big deal, but for some people who have certain intestinal issues it can put them in the hospital. I know someone who can't eat anything with nuts or little hard bits of anything in it because of diverticulitis or diverticulosis or something, so he'd be pretty cheesed off if someone fed him plastic glitter,

 

I think that people just assume that anything you put on a cake is edible, so that's how people get away with it. Customers don't question it.

maybenot Posted 27 Jan 2015 , 2:39am
post #26 of 26

Well, although I would never use it on my own, or my family's food--I don't consciously eat plastic-- I say if someone wants to fill a shaker with it and sprinkle it on their cereal every morning, I couldn't care less. I guess we all poison ourselves in our own ways.

 

But, when it comes to selling food with disco dust on it, or teaching classes to others that encourage putting it on food, I get angry, too.

 

As for chockywockydoodah--or any other UK vendor-- I guess they didn't get the memo, they don't care, or they don't know.  The Food Standards Agency seems pretty darn clear on it:

 

http://tna.europarchive.org/20140306205048/http://www.food.gov.uk/multimedia/faq/edibleglitter/

 

and the debacle that seems to have started the attention was well publicized:

 

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2580168/Businesswoman-sold-edible-cupcake-glitter-shredded-plastic-powdered-brass-insisted-safe-despite-repeated-warnings.html

 

I lay some of the fault at those who package the stuff, the wholesalers & the retailers. They're all making a ton of money on it and yet they never say exactly what it is on the packaging.  The disclaimers allow for interpretation and misunderstandings.  They, too, are hiding behind the lack of understanding between edible vs. non toxic and ultimately, they say it's not up to them to control how people use it.  True, but they sure could decrease the numbers using it the wrong way by stating, "This is PLASTIC craft glitter and is not for use on items that will be eaten."  No bakery could easily circumvent that.......

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%