Azwishchicky Posted 25 Dec 2013 , 6:15am
post #1 of

On each tier, between the layers, the fondant bulged. Why?

 

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62 replies
leah_s Posted 25 Dec 2013 , 9:03am
post #2 of

ABecause you didn't let your cake go thru the settling process.

osorio Posted 25 Dec 2013 , 10:55am
post #3 of

AHi leah_s How do you do the settling process correctly ? Thanks

Azwishchicky Posted 25 Dec 2013 , 3:28pm
post #4 of

Yes... and how long should the process take?

Cakepro Posted 25 Dec 2013 , 5:40pm
post #5 of

Because your filling/icing was too thin and used without a dam, and/or because you used way too much.

AnnieCahill Posted 25 Dec 2013 , 6:47pm
post #6 of

AOverfilled the cake, dam right on the edge...

Bakers Crush Posted 26 Dec 2013 , 4:49am
post #7 of

Ado you have supports between tiers?

Smckinney07 Posted 26 Dec 2013 , 9:35am
post #8 of

AI like to let mine settle overnight or 4-6hrs depending on the cake, you need to lay something flat on each tier (separately), nothing heavy enough to break your cake but with enough weight to gently push down to force settling. I believe it was Leah who introduced the 'tile' method, it's the perfect amount of pressure.

A dam is important for fruit type fillings, I think many people use them regardless. As always proper supports are crucial for tiered cakes.

Personally, with the thickness of your layers, you might want more icing to cake-that's just my preference.

ddaigle Posted 26 Dec 2013 , 2:40pm
post #9 of

Agree.....an overnight in the frig is all you need...the tile thing cracks me up...I would never put tiles on my cakes...but whatever works....It's good to see all the different answers/solutions.

leah_s Posted 27 Dec 2013 , 4:58am

ACake really doesn't settle in the fridge. Once the filling gets cold and soli the settling is defeated. But as the cake comes to room temp, it will start to settle and bulge.

flours4u Posted 27 Dec 2013 , 7:48am

Quote:

Originally Posted by leah_s 

Cake really doesn't settle in the fridge. Once the filling gets cold and soli the settling is defeated. But as the cake comes to room temp, it will start to settle and bulge.

Hi~ So you dam it with butter frosting?  and then filling in between?  If you just use butter frosting in between don't need a dam right?  sorry I too have this issue at times.  Ive never used a dam.  thanks in advance for responding. ;)

ddaigle Posted 27 Dec 2013 , 12:23pm

Quote:

Originally Posted by leah_s 

Cake really doesn't settle in the fridge. Once the filling gets cold and soli the settling is defeated. But as the cake comes to room temp, it will start to settle and bulge.


Well...I think there is more than one way to skin a cat.  When  I worked at a production bakery and would walk in on Saturday with 22 orders on my clip board...all due by closing..that is how we did it to survive the cake orders and safely get them out the door.   I never damn a buttercream filled cake either...only dam if I have a gooey filling.  I have never had a bulge.

 

I think it is good for all of us to give all of our vast amount of ways to do things and let the OP decide what works for her.  

leah_s Posted 27 Dec 2013 , 12:47pm

AWell I don't use "butter frosting" but no I don't dam if bc is the filling. Anything other than bc then yes, I def use a dam.

Back when I worked in a production bakery (the good old days?) I don't remember having bulging issues BUT we also used bucket But-R-Cream. That stuff is easy to work with but tastes, well . . . Maybe using more delicate (probably not the best description) icing makes the difference.

ddaigle Posted 27 Dec 2013 , 1:57pm

I agree Leah...Maybe different types of icing gives different results.   At the bakery we used the high ratio-all shortening butter cream...one of the few things they actually made.   After changing many different times, I also now use the high ratio-all shortening butter cream.   Very stable.  I likey.

Godot Posted 27 Dec 2013 , 3:22pm

A

Original message sent by leah_s

...Back when I worked in a production bakery (the good old days?) I don't remember having bulging issues BUT we also used bucket But-R-Cream.

Oh dear. Anything with the name But-R-Cream can't possibly be considered edible.

-K8memphis Posted 27 Dec 2013 , 4:10pm

not only edible, godot, but it's also one of the best performing icings i've ever used--you can make it as smooth as glass--great stuff--

Godot Posted 27 Dec 2013 , 4:17pm

AI, for one, would like to see an ingredients label. On second thought, maybe not.......

ddaigle Posted 27 Dec 2013 , 4:26pm

Godot...But-R-Cream is sold at Sam's...for your label viewing.........or not! :-D

Godot Posted 27 Dec 2013 , 4:34pm

AOkay! Google is an amazing resource. I've just looked up info on But-R-Creme (yes, it is spelled creme)

Sugar, partially hydrogenated vegetable oil (soybean and/or palm oil), water, cornstarch, mono & diglycerides, polysorbate 60, salt, polyglycerol esters of fatty acids, artificial flavors, potassium sorbate, sorbic acid, citric acid, propylene glycol, dextrose.

Just as I thought - inedible.

-K8memphis Posted 27 Dec 2013 , 5:13pm

it's not exactly shocking that dawn foods produces commercial icing that has stabilizers and emulisfiers etc.just like the store bought home use icings would--tons of foods contain these ingredients--nothing new--

 

food grade propylene glycol--the fda and world health org recognizes it as a viable food additive--in it's industrial grade it is toxic of course--

 

i've used that icing for years in shops where i've worked--never used it for my own work--it is eaten all day long--every day--

 

http://sciencefare.org/ingredients-scientific-cooking/

 

link for anyone who wants to read up on the meanings behind the scientific words in ingredient lists--

 

here's one for yahs--we use and recommend this one constantly:

 

carboxymethycellulose

 

whooooo scary

Godot Posted 27 Dec 2013 , 5:21pm

AJeez looeez. Are you lecturing me?

(Babble babble - how's that AZ? Heehee)

-K8memphis Posted 27 Dec 2013 , 5:30pm

no i'm discussing chemicals in products--scientific names in ingredient lists can be quite off putting but learning about them takes some of the sting out of it for everyone in general--

 

i'd figure you already know what was in a commercially produced icing--

 

the link is there for anyone else

leah_s Posted 27 Dec 2013 , 5:39pm

AActually But-R-Creme tastes like classic bakery icing and is the easiest product to work with you'll find.

-K8memphis Posted 27 Dec 2013 , 6:04pm
Quote:

Aqualon sodium carboxymethylcellulose... is made by reacting sodium monochloroacetate with alkalicellulose under rigidly controlled conditions.

Godot Posted 27 Dec 2013 , 6:17pm

ADo we have a "rolling eye" smiley?

MikeRowesHunny Posted 27 Dec 2013 , 7:01pm

Ewww, just ewwwww. I think I'll stick with my non-chemical, real food icing and work harder with it :-D. To the OP, I've used ganache under my fondant exclusively for years now, and those bulges are a thing of the dim & distant past, regardless of what the filling is.

JWinslow Posted 27 Dec 2013 , 7:10pm

I for one do not want a chemical interpreter to understand the ingredients. 

Smckinney07 Posted 27 Dec 2013 , 7:37pm

AI use ganache often and love working with it. I used a crusting BC when I started, honestly I never had much luck with it-the viva and roller smoothing methods I mean.

I use meringue BC now and it's so much easier for me to work with

MikeRowesHunny Posted 27 Dec 2013 , 8:46pm

Quote:

Originally Posted by Smckinney07 

I use ganache often and love working with it. I used a crusting BC when I started, honestly I never had much luck with it-the viva and roller smoothing methods I mean.

I use meringue BC now and it's so much easier for me to work with

Agree, meringue buttercream is the way to go!

leah_s Posted 27 Dec 2013 , 9:48pm

Hey, I'm not saying I like what I'm calling "classic bakery icing", i'm just thinking you all know what that tastes like.  I certainly never used it in my own business!

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