Help...eiffel Tower Cake

Decorating By ladonnaa Updated 20 Dec 2013 , 8:38pm by Smckinney07

ladonnaa Posted 18 Dec 2013 , 2:50pm
post #1 of 9

AMy aunt has requested an Eiffel Tower cake for her birthday. I found a tutorial but wanted to know what's best used to get the metal framework/lines like in the pic here:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/rdpjcakes/sets/72157624602040383/

8 replies
AnnieCahill Posted 18 Dec 2013 , 3:54pm
post #2 of 9

Pipe it.

ladonnaa Posted 18 Dec 2013 , 4:24pm
post #3 of 9

AI'm new to this and have never piped anything before. Should I use piping gel or royal icing?

-K8memphis Posted 18 Dec 2013 , 5:11pm
post #4 of 9

i would use a combination of chocolate icing to pipe the small x's and things like that--

 

then i'd also use brown modeling chocolate to make some of the strips to lay on there--

 

modeling chocolate will not stretch out like fondant will--to help get some of those nice crisp lines--

 

not to mention this is a tall order (pun intended ;) for being new and a first piping project--

 

but i've seen some people start out piping almost perfectly on a flat surface--which is pretty amazing and annoying all at the same time --hope you are one of those--

 

but even those would have a time piping up the side of something like the e.t.first time out the piping gate--

 

it's a lot of skill involved--and the surface changes too--high degree of difficulty there--

ladonnaa Posted 18 Dec 2013 , 5:20pm
post #5 of 9

AThanks K8. I appreciate your response. Its funny you said all of that. Right before I read your post, I looked at the tutorial again and was thinking that is going to be a lot of work. I will have to decide if I'm up to that large of a challenge or if I should do something on a smaller scale and try that when I am more skilled and comfortable.

-K8memphis Posted 18 Dec 2013 , 5:43pm
post #6 of 9

if the piping was on a relatively unchanging surface--like the top of a cake -- sure that's a good place to start--but you'll have to do some acrobatical piping on the eiffel tower--oh i feel a new word being born--acropipatical-- (long i on the 'pip' )

 

and that could be all cut out of modeling chocolate or fondant -- and that would be one way for a newbie to accurately accomplish that--but i'd recommend getting a friend to help--

 

and if you did decide to do it--think real big--cut out many pieces at once from long stands of whichever dough you use--go with the modeling choco--fondant dries out quicker--

 

you can do this though--consider doing a very small scale--

deuceofcakes Posted 20 Dec 2013 , 5:07pm
post #7 of 9

Perhaps it would be better to try a small Eiffel Tower on a standard round or even square cake.  

Have you stacked and carved cakes before?  If not, I'd probably stick to a smaller one.  

 

Here's another tutorial for making a petite tower from royal icing.  

http://www.sugarduchess.com/2011/02/eiffel-tower-tutorial/

 

Good luck!

-K8memphis Posted 20 Dec 2013 , 6:07pm
post #8 of 9

Quote:

Originally Posted by deuceofcakes 
 

Perhaps it would be better to try a small Eiffel Tower on a standard round or even square cake.  

Have you stacked and carved cakes before?  If not, I'd probably stick to a smaller one.  

 

Here's another tutorial for making a petite tower from royal icing.  

http://www.sugarduchess.com/2011/02/eiffel-tower-tutorial/

 

Good luck!

 

 

oh dueceofcakes--fantastic post--ladonnaa, this is a great idea--very attainable--just be practicing the piping and you got this--it's not a big degree of difficulty--make a few extra pieces as you go--

 

and if by any chance you can add some gum arabic to your royal it will be stronger but regular royal will totally get you there too--no worries--

 

hey--make a cookie or have a piece of fondant dried out to set it on the cake--be careful setting it on icing because for one thing it can sink into the icing and for another the fat in the icing can break it down--

 

love this idea for you--you can practice your piping and make your aunt a very happy lady on her birthday --

Smckinney07 Posted 20 Dec 2013 , 8:38pm
post #9 of 9

Ahttp://www.lovelytutorials.com/forum/showthread.php?t=2602

This was from a blog, I can't remember who's but it's a smaller version. It's Mike M's workshop and they use a pattern to imprint on modeling chocolate. You could make your own or print out and use a tool to trace the indentations. For me this is easier then piping but that's just me-still a more advanced design do what your comfortable with.

Another idea would be to hand paint white on grey fondant, or black-I saw several versions when I did an online search. Or edible markers.

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%