PhilGlew Posted 15 Dec 2013 , 1:31pm
post #1 of

Hello,

I am making fondant-filled candy bars, and so far have been successful in both the melting of the chocolate, moulting, adding fondant filling and then sealing. However, when they set, they melt instantly when anyone picks one up for a few seconds... let alone packaging!

 

Please can you advise what ingredients I can add to my tempered chocolate to keep it from melting? What do commercial chocolatiers use to prevent instant melting?

 

Thanks,

Phil

25 replies
-K8memphis Posted 15 Dec 2013 , 1:35pm
post #2 of

what i can share is that in the baking forum on egullet.org is a group of devoted chocolatiers that post regularly about in depth and intriguing chocolate adventures -- they are as dedicated to chocolates as this board is to cake-- so a thought there for you --

Stitches Posted 15 Dec 2013 , 3:33pm
post #3 of

There's only two possible answers I can think of.

 

a. your shell is too thin

b. your shell is too thin

rychevamp Posted 16 Dec 2013 , 6:59pm
post #4 of

There's nothing you can add to prevent chocolate from melting.  Either, like stated before, your shell is too thin, or the temper is off.  I do a lot of chocolate molding, and I don't have any trouble with melting. If the shell is too thin, the fondant is probably leaking through and causing the breakdown.  

Double line the molds and see if it makes a difference.  Some chocolates are more fluid than others, depending on cocoa butter content.

BatterUpCake Posted 16 Dec 2013 , 7:34pm
post #5 of

This is a great topic. I made cake pops with callebaut chocolate and some with candy melts. the chocolate would not set up without being refrigerated and melts when you touch it. I find that bring to melt very easily anyway....but I was wondering why it wouldn't set up

rychevamp Posted 16 Dec 2013 , 8:23pm
post #6 of

I use Callebaut for a lot of things, but like with all couverture, it has to be tempered to set properly.  Snap, shine, set a room temp, no refrigeration needed.  I don't use candy melts or anything like them, so I can give any info on those.  The only non couverture I use is Cocoa Barry's Pate Glacer, as it works extremely well for dipping strawberries.  Tempered chocolate can seize if water from the strawberries get in it, so I don't risk it. 

BatterUpCake Posted 16 Dec 2013 , 9:02pm
post #7 of

I haven't tempered chocolate yet. So I don't really know how to do it...

Stitches Posted 16 Dec 2013 , 9:15pm
post #8 of

Quote:

Originally Posted by rychevamp 
 

  I don't use candy melts or anything like them, so I can give any info on those.  The only non couverture I use is Cocoa Barry's Pate Glacer, as it works extremely well for dipping strawberries. 

The candy melts are a lot like the Pate Glacer but about 6 times more dense (and horrible tasting with a non-melting mouth feel). You can't get a nice shine on either of them with-out really respecting their temp. range.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BatterUpCake 
 

This is a great topic. I made cake pops with callebaut chocolate and some with candy melts. the chocolate would not set up without being refrigerated and melts when you touch it. I find that bring to melt very easily anyway....but I was wondering why it wouldn't set up

That's really the only way to "handle/work-with" chocolate with-out tempering it, put it in the cooler. BUT, it will melt the minute it's out of the cooler....because it's not tempered.

 

Which brings me back the OP's original question. If it is indeed melting like BatterUpCake mentioned your chocolate was NOT in temper as you thought it was.

MBalaska Posted 16 Dec 2013 , 9:40pm
post #9 of

Quote:

Originally Posted by BatterUpCake 
 

I haven't tempered chocolate yet. So I don't really know how to do it...

by hand.....me either, BatterUpCake.   I had a tempering machine for a few years, but it was an expensive hobby. It worked perfectly on dark chocolate so that's what I used.  (I never could get it to work with milk chocolate, Oh well).  Don't have the machine any more.

BatterUpCake Posted 16 Dec 2013 , 9:55pm

callabaut sells some pretempered chocolate you mix with the untempered chocolate. But they look like candy melts to me

MBalaska Posted 16 Dec 2013 , 10:17pm

does it also taste like candy melts? or is it good tasting chocolate but just thicker.

-K8memphis Posted 16 Dec 2013 , 10:22pm

even the finest chichi foofoo chocolates come in that shape--it's just a shape

rychevamp Posted 16 Dec 2013 , 11:06pm

All couverture chocolates offer callets or blocks.  Depends on if you want to chop or not.  

There is a product called mycryo http://www.cacao-barry.com/uken/809  (for info) that can be used to temper chocolate.  I've never used it, but have heard it works.

Tempering by hand can be trying at times.  I used to do 30 lbs at a time to make sheets for chocolate shards for a catering co. I worked for, and I did the tabling method. But, I invested in a commercial tempering machine several years ago when I was selling artisan chocolates.  Trying to keep chocolate in temper in a bowl when you have a lot to do is too much of a pain.  Learning to temper by hand is a good skill to have though.  It helps you understand how chocolate works.

shanter Posted 16 Dec 2013 , 11:50pm

http://www.topwithcinnamon.com/2012/12/how-to-temper-chocolate-the-easy-way.html

BatterUpCake Posted 17 Dec 2013 , 4:07am

Quote:

Originally Posted by shanter 
 

http://www.topwithcinnamon.com/2012/12/how-to-temper-chocolate-the-easy-way.html

can't wait to try!

BatterUpCake Posted 17 Dec 2013 , 4:07am

Quote:

Originally Posted by MBalaska 
 

does it also taste like candy melts? or is it good tasting chocolate but just thicker.

haven't tried it

rychevamp Posted 20 Dec 2013 , 12:51am

So, here are the chocolates I've been working on for Christmas gifts.  They are all molded, expect the caramels are dipped. If the chocolate is in proper temper, they hold at room temp.  

Flavors are: Raspberry, Tiramisu, Peanut Butter, Maple Walnut, Dark Chocolate, Peppermint, Eggnog, Caramel Apple, Pumpkin Caramel, Passion Fruit, Honey Vanilla Caramels, Caramelized Pear, Absinthe.

 

Stitches Posted 20 Dec 2013 , 12:58am

Very professional bonbons!! Great job!

MBalaska Posted 20 Dec 2013 , 1:50am

Quote:

Originally Posted by rychevamp 
 

So, here are the chocolates I've been working on for Christmas gifts.  They are all molded, expect the caramels are dipped. If the chocolate is in proper temper, they hold at room temp.  

Flavors are: Raspberry, Tiramisu, Peanut Butter, Maple Walnut, Dark Chocolate, Peppermint, Eggnog, Caramel Apple, Pumpkin Caramel, Passion Fruit, Honey Vanilla Caramels, Caramelized Pear, Absinthe.

spectacular! you are a highly skilled professional chocolatier.

Norasmom Posted 20 Dec 2013 , 2:43am

beautiful!

Smckinney07 Posted 20 Dec 2013 , 3:22am

AThey look like something you'd get from Godiva, just lovely! I've always wanted to work more with chocolates.

Sassyzan Posted 20 Dec 2013 , 3:59am

A

Original message sent by shanter

[URL=http://www.topwithcinnamon.com/2012/12/how-to-temper-chocolate-the-easy-way.html]http://www.topwithcinnamon.com/2012/12/how-to-temper-chocolate-the-easy-way.html[/URL]

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Thank you for posting this!

rychevamp Posted 20 Dec 2013 , 4:09am

Thanks everyone.  I love doing them, but I am so busy I can't find that much time anymore.  It's been two years since I last made any. I've gotten an inquiry from a large hotel in the area about providing chocolates for them, so I may have to figure something out. Why couldn't I have gotten something like that when I was trying it as a business?? :)

BatterUpCake Posted 20 Dec 2013 , 4:32am

Quote:

Originally Posted by BatterUpCake 
 

can't wait to try!

tried this method tonight and it was perfect

SweetCarolines Posted 27 Dec 2013 , 2:13pm

AThose are gorgeous, rychevamp!

When I was in culinary school I really wanted to be a chocolatier. This post is bringing back those feelings. No one around here works with chocolate. Maybe I should start making bon bons again to set myself apart... °evil laugh°

Tempering really isn't that hard, if you have a good digital thermometer. It kils your arms, though. I'm gonna give that new method a try. So hard to find good chocolate in Puerto Rico, though.

rychevamp Posted 28 Dec 2013 , 2:29am

Quote:

Originally Posted by SweetCarolines 

Those are gorgeous, rychevamp!

When I was in culinary school I really wanted to be a chocolatier. This post is bringing back those feelings. No one around here works with chocolate. Maybe I should start making bon bons again to set myself apart... °evil laugh°

Tempering really isn't that hard, if you have a good digital thermometer. It kils your arms, though. I'm gonna give that new method a try. So hard to find good chocolate in Puerto Rico, though.

Thanks!  If you can corner the market there, do it :).  It's hard to make a living just selling chocolates.  Cakes tend to be more of an expense people will go for than truffles. I do them on the side when I have time from my normal pastry job.

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