tasteetreats Posted 11 Dec 2013 , 2:36pm
post #1 of

I've recently started my bakery business and I'm not sure what to charge for holiday cookies. What do you think?

15 replies
-K8memphis Posted 11 Dec 2013 , 3:02pm
post #2 of

define 'holiday cookies' there's so many different kinds

ddaigle Posted 11 Dec 2013 , 3:04pm
post #3 of

I have 4 sizes for cookies...S-M-L-XL.    99% of my cookies fall within one of those size groups.   If someone wants a special highly decorated custom cookie...then that gets a price according to what I think.    Some people charge a $1 an inch.   That pricing here in Baton Rouge would never work.    So, I realize I haven't answered your question, because I think what I charge may not be what you should.  What is your market area charging?  I would use that as a "guide". 

tasteetreats Posted 11 Dec 2013 , 4:57pm
post #4 of

Well I guess instead of holiday cookies I should have just stated cookies. I'm supposed to bake 3 dozen cookies. A set of eggnog cookies, chocolate chip, and sugar.

ddaigle Posted 11 Dec 2013 , 5:54pm
post #5 of

A. I keep forgetting there are other cookies besides cut out because that is all I do So my answer was based on cut out cookies

tasteetreats Posted 11 Dec 2013 , 6:26pm
post #6 of

oh ok, I'm really new to this I hadn't even thought of cut outs lol

mightydragon663 Posted 11 Dec 2013 , 6:52pm
post #7 of

I charge $10/dozen for cookies that are approx 2 1/2 - 3 in diameter. 

howsweet Posted 11 Dec 2013 , 7:05pm
post #8 of

Depends on the size and luxuriousness of the cookie. Most places prefer to make a large cookie so they can sell it for more. That's why restaurants put so much on your plate. If it seems like the ingredients are the largest factor, you're not charging nearly enough for labor.

 

Go to places that sell cookies - Panera, Subway,  a real bakery and extrapolate from that. Asking what people here charge is likely to give you a skewed view of proper pricing.

-K8memphis Posted 11 Dec 2013 , 7:30pm
post #9 of

Quote:

Originally Posted by howsweet 
 

 ... luxuriousness of the cookie...

 

great phrase

MimiFix Posted 11 Dec 2013 , 8:47pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by tasteetreats 
 

A set of eggnog cookies, chocolate chip, and sugar.

 

What's "a set of" cookies? Do you mean a dozen each of those three varieties? Or are they graduated in size? Or something else? 

liz at sugar Posted 12 Dec 2013 , 12:16am

It is futile to ask here what you should charge for your cookies - you need to add up the cost of ingredients, your time, your overhead, your profit, etc.  For $7 you can download the Cakeulator app where you can input your recipe, with how many cookies it yields, how much time it takes, packaging, etc.  Then you add in a profit margin.  It will break it down to the cookie how much you should charge - maybe you should look into it?

 

I sell a single chocolate chip cookie for $2.00 - but that won't help you - you don't know what my ingredients are, or how much they cost me.  Mine are 2.6 ounces each and have three kinds of luxury chocolate in them  Still probably not enough information to help you, because I am guessing you don't know the weight of each of your cookies at this point.  Gather some data, do a little math, and you will be able to figure out what to sell your cookies for, including an hourly wage for yourself and a profit. And set a minimum order amount - 2 or 3 dozen of each kind, so it is worth it for you to turn your mixer on. :)

 

Liz

enga Posted 12 Dec 2013 , 1:02am
Quote:
Originally Posted by liz at sugar 
 

It is futile to ask here what you should charge for your cookies - you need to add up the cost of ingredients, your time, your overhead, your profit, etc.  For $7 you can download the Cakeulator app where you can input your recipe, with how many cookies it yields, how much time it takes, packaging, etc.  Then you add in a profit margin.  It will break it down to the cookie how much you should charge - maybe you should look into it?

 

I sell a single chocolate chip cookie for $2.00 - but that won't help you - you don't know what my ingredients are, or how much they cost me.  Mine are 2.6 ounces each and have three kinds of luxury chocolate in them  Still probably not enough information to help you, because I am guessing you don't know the weight of each of your cookies at this point.  Gather some data, do a little math, and you will be able to figure out what to sell your cookies for, including an hourly wage for yourself and a profit. And set a minimum order amount - 2 or 3 dozen of each kind, so it is worth it for you to turn your mixer on. :)

 

Liz


AMEN!!!!!  No sugar, no shade, just Very Good Advice!

 

 

p.s “No T No Shade" = I’m not trying to come for you or offend you, but this is what its really like.”

substituted "sugar" for "T", after all this is a cake decorating site,lol

morganchampagne Posted 12 Dec 2013 , 1:21am

ALol Enga!!

enga Posted 12 Dec 2013 , 1:25am

Hee he he, I love my queens.

enga Posted 12 Dec 2013 , 3:43am
Quote:
Originally Posted by tasteetreats 
 

I've recently started my bakery business and I'm not sure what to charge for holiday cookies. What do you think?


Here are some ideas of prices but as others have stated it's almost impossible to know what works for you because what you pay for ingredients and packaging might make your prices higher or lower than theirs. Costing out your recipes and charging for the work and detail you put on them will give you a better idea of how to price your cookies.

 

http://www.etsy.com/listing/96323318/girls-baby-shower-cookies?ref=shop_home_feat

 

http://www.redroosterbaking.com/index.php/cookies/eggnog-butter-cookie.html

 

I hand paint my butter cookies, my 20qt recipe calls for 8# of butter which isn't cheap. They start at $2.50 and are 2 1/2 inches. The more elaborate the design, the higher the price.

 

Good Luck with your bakery business!

tasteetreats Posted 4 Feb 2014 , 1:43pm

Thank you all :) And Enga I know all about T and shade :) lol

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