Anyone Can Open A Bakery! Right?

Business By ellavanilla Updated 11 Dec 2013 , 7:51pm by howsweet

ellavanilla Posted 10 Dec 2013 , 4:42pm
post #1 of 31

I was so frustrated watching "Bakery Boss" last night. if you haven't seen it, it's a show with Buddy Valastro, who visits failing bakeries and helps reset the business.So most of the bakeries are businesses which once operated successfully, but have declined in their latter years, for one reason or another. 

 

However, last night the bakery was owned by a woman who loved baking for her family and just decided to leave her job and open a store in the mall selling baked goods. Who are these people with the resources to blow that kind of money?

 

So Buddy does a tasting and proclaims everything crap--especially her strawberry cupcake, which was made by adding kool aid to the batter and frosting. 8O

 

The woman comes on screen and explains that it's so HARD because baking at home is nothing like baking large batches in a bakery. I think she had little tears in her eyes. Throughout the show she bemoaned her lack of professional training, as if everyone should be more understanding about it. 

 

I actually shouted at the TV. What did she think it was going to be like? Of course it's not the same! Professionals have professional training? What a shocker! At the very least, you need some business training so that you can understand just how much money you're losing. 

 

Finally, Buddy taught them how to make a strawberry cupcake. You'll never guess what he added to the batter to get that strawberry flavor...

30 replies
BatterUpCake Posted 10 Dec 2013 , 4:56pm
post #2 of 31

Quote:

Originally Posted by ellavanilla 
 

I was so frustrated watching "Bakery Boss" last night. if you haven't seen it, it's a show with Buddy Valastro, who visits failing bakeries and helps reset the business.So most of the bakeries are businesses which once operated successfully, but have declined in their latter years, for one reason or another.

 

However, last night the bakery was owned by a woman who loved baking for her family and just decided to leave her job and open a store in the mall selling baked goods. Who are these people with the resources to blow that kind of money?

 

So Buddy does a tasting and proclaims everything crap--especially her strawberry cupcake, which was made by adding kool aid to the batter and frosting. 8O

 

The woman comes on screen and explains that it's so HARD because baking at home is nothing like baking large batches in a bakery. I think she had little tears in her eyes. Throughout the show she bemoaned her lack of professional training, as if everyone should be more understanding about it.

 

I actually shouted at the TV. What did she think it was going to be like? Of course it's not the same! Professionals have professional training? What a shocker! At the very least, you need some business training so that you can understand just how much money you're losing.

 

Finally, Buddy taught them how to make a strawberry cupcake. You'll never guess what he added to the batter to get that strawberry flavor...

Jello??? I have seen many recipes calling for that.....but it was probably strawberries

kikiandkyle Posted 10 Dec 2013 , 6:34pm
post #3 of 31

AI saw it was on and recorded it to watch tonight. Sounds like I'd better make sure my shoes are out of sight so I can't throw them at the tv!

MimiFix Posted 10 Dec 2013 , 6:54pm
post #4 of 31

That lady should have asked Jason what to do. A business plan would have saved her from herself. There's been too much hype in the last few years about how easy it is to start a food business. But good info is available everywhere. These people are too pigheaded and self-absorbed to think they might have problems.

 

I no longer have compassion or sympathy for people, such as the woman you described. They deserve the fate that comes along with their foolishness. I'm just a big old meanie who understands the importance of writing a simple business plan.

Godot Posted 10 Dec 2013 , 8:03pm
post #5 of 31

ASo many people are victims of their own stupidity.

jason_kraft Posted 10 Dec 2013 , 8:38pm
post #6 of 31

AI've found that if you have domain knowledge on a subject being portrayed in media it's a lot less frustrating to view what you are watching as pure fiction made for entertainment purposes only, even if it's "reality" TV. Especially if it's "reality" TV.

At least the show is highlighting the difficulties of running a bakery vs. baking at home.

theresaf Posted 10 Dec 2013 , 9:30pm
post #7 of 31

Oh the whining on that show was infuriating! Why didn't she just say the dog ate her real strawberry cupcake recipe!  And Buddy added strawberries to the batter.  Who would have thought of THAT?  And I'm sorry all grandmas out there, if your nickname is Booger because your grandkid wants to call you that, keep that secret to yourself.  Use your real name.  Or any other name.  I will not watch that again :-t

Theresa

howsweet Posted 10 Dec 2013 , 10:11pm
post #8 of 31

AI agree with Jason.

MBalaska Posted 10 Dec 2013 , 10:15pm
post #9 of 31

Quote:

Originally Posted by Godot 

So many people are victims of their own stupidity.

and you CAN'T fix stupid.

MBalaska Posted 10 Dec 2013 , 10:23pm
post #10 of 31

Quote:

Originally Posted by ellavanilla 
 

I was so frustrated watching "Bakery Boss" last night.

Can't watch any of his shows any longer.  I miss that show that had those folks in those 'Cake Decorating'  businesses.

"Amazing Wedding Cakes" where there were several people in different towns making such a large variety of beautiful cakes.

MimiFix Posted 10 Dec 2013 , 10:30pm
post #11 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by jason_kraft   At least the show is highlighting the difficulties of running a bakery vs. baking at home.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MBalaska   and you CAN'T fix stupid.

 

Yes, people will see the difficulties of running a bakery vs. baking at home. But they are too stupid to realize that these issues would affect them.

howsweet Posted 10 Dec 2013 , 10:37pm
post #12 of 31

AI agree with Mimi

costumeczar Posted 11 Dec 2013 , 2:26am
post #13 of 31

Quote:

Originally Posted by MimiFix 
 

 

 

Yes, people will see the difficulties of running a bakery vs. baking at home. But they are too stupid to realize that these issues would affect them.

Well, of course. Because they're special, and reality doesn't apply to them.

BrandisBaked Posted 11 Dec 2013 , 3:26am
post #14 of 31

AThey took a risk to do what they loved, and when it wasn't working, they called in help. I applaud them and wish them success. :-D

morganchampagne Posted 11 Dec 2013 , 3:30am
post #15 of 31

A

Original message sent by BrandisBaked

They took a risk to do what they loved, and when it wasn't working, they called in help. I applaud them and wish them success. :-D

Ditto

sewsugarqueen Posted 11 Dec 2013 , 3:43am
post #16 of 31

The main reason I work for a friend's bakery and get out my baking frustrations there rather than try to run one myself was looking at all the money and work involved.  I assume bakeries are like restaurants with the failure rate very high.  Have to agree I have no pity for people who think they can just open up a place because they love to bake... #1 it's a business. ( as most of us know)

ellavanilla Posted 11 Dec 2013 , 3:47am
post #17 of 31

Yes! It was strawberries! Shocking discovery.

 

I have watched other episodes of the show and I enjoy it. As irritating as the Cake Boss show became, Buddy shows a real compassion when dealing with people who have had health or economic issues with their business, or who have simply lost the plot. 

 

But I can't feel too much sympathy for someone who spends their family resources on a whim and then whines about being in over his or her head. 

 

I mean, it's strawberries. How good can you be if you can't figure that out?

 

 

I know a prominent chef who pitched a show about burgeoning food businesses. He called it, "Pickled Pigs Feet" as an aside to every person who thinks they have a fabulous family recipe (pigs feet) that will make a million, but is really only special to them. 

 

*edited to add*

and yes, I did bake for him, and he was scurred...until he tried it!

jason_kraft Posted 11 Dec 2013 , 4:26am
post #18 of 31

A

Original message sent by BrandisBaked

They took a risk to do what they loved, and when it wasn't working, they called in help.

Except they took far more of a risk than necessary due to the lack of initial planning. There's nothing wrong with taking an informed risk, but if much of the risk could have been mitigated so as to avoid betting the success of the business on a hail-mary pass that's not really something to applaud. Although I'm sure the TLC producers were thrilled.

johnson6ofus Posted 11 Dec 2013 , 4:42am
post #19 of 31

Quote:

Originally Posted by BrandisBaked 

They took a risk to do what they loved, and when it wasn't working, they called in help. I applaud them and wish them success. icon_biggrin.gif


I want to be a brain surgeon, but wouldn't dream of doing it without training. Why is running a bakery any different?

 

Education (whether formal, or not) in both running a business and the baking aspects, is key.

BrandisBaked Posted 11 Dec 2013 , 4:44am
post #20 of 31

A

Original message sent by johnson6ofus

I want to be a brain surgeon, but wouldn't dream of doing it without training. Why is running a bakery any different?

Education (whether formal, or not) in both running a business and the baking aspects, is key.

I don't think any customers will die if they fail in their endeavor.

ellavanilla Posted 11 Dec 2013 , 4:22pm
post #21 of 31

But there are professional standards to maintain.I resent when our industry isn't given the respect that it deserves, especially when they want to be a part of it.

 

Don't go off half cocked and then cry about it.

BrandisBaked Posted 11 Dec 2013 , 4:56pm
post #22 of 31

AWow. So no one should be allowed to take a risk and learn as they go? Do you think Ron Ben Israel, Colette Peters, et al. had years of baking and business experience under their belts before they opened shop?

howsweet Posted 11 Dec 2013 , 5:04pm
post #23 of 31

Quote:

Originally Posted by BrandisBaked 


I don't think any customers will die if they fail in their endeavor.


So Johnson may have used an extreme example in his analogy...it doesn't take away from his point which was if you want to be successful at something, you should learn what you need to know to succeed.

 

And everyone is "allowed" to take all the risks they want. But some risks are unwise and unnecessary. If you spend your life savings on something why take anymore risk than absolutely necessary?

BrandisBaked Posted 11 Dec 2013 , 5:11pm
post #24 of 31

AAh, but you never know what you don't know... Do you?

howsweet Posted 11 Dec 2013 , 5:28pm
post #25 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrandisBaked 

Ah, but you never know what you don't know... Do you?


That's an interesting question. To some degree recognizing what you don't know has to do with a person's level of intelligence. It's also effected by a person's method for analyzing a situation and how much effort is put forth in doing so. But ultimately, you're right, if you mean no one can know 100% of what they don't know. That's the point of med school in Johnson's analogy. That kind of training is designed to avoid that issue.

 

If you look at Anne Heap, the owner of the most successful cake businesses in the country, Pink Cake Box...first she got a degree in advertising, then went to pastry school and then got an internship at a very successful cake operation, Ron Ben Israel. Sounds like she knew quite a bit of what she didn't know.

jason_kraft Posted 11 Dec 2013 , 5:37pm
post #26 of 31

A

Original message sent by BrandisBaked

So no one should be allowed to take a risk and learn as they go?

Refraining from applauding an action is not the same thing as not allowing an action at all.

johnson6ofus Posted 11 Dec 2013 , 6:59pm
post #27 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by jason_kraft 


Refraining from applauding an action is not the same thing as not allowing an action at all.

This is where I was going, what Jason said here. I do not want to applaud stupidity and ignorance.

 

I did not teach my children to swim but throwing them into the deep end of the pool. Yes, some can survive that trauma. I, on the other hand, prefer a well thought out approach that avoids as many pitfalls and problems as possible. Just read on CC the many know and then further unforeseen problems we all have had. Avoiding the ones "I know/ or should have know about" helps free me up for the real blind sides.

 

Standing and cheering that you have the "guts" (as this "just jump in and do it" mentality/ stupidity is often referred to as...) to jump in blind is just not good business advice. Your health, wealth and sanity are at risk. 

MimiFix Posted 11 Dec 2013 , 7:18pm
post #28 of 31

I agree, Johnson. And very well said. Unfortunately, there are always posters here who encourage that reckless behavior.

IAmPamCakes Posted 11 Dec 2013 , 7:23pm
post #29 of 31

AI just watched the episode last night. I've wanted my own shop for years, but I don't have the money to just throw around without proper planning, and knowing my craft inside & out. She had no spine. Her daughter was a spoiled brat, and they annoyed the heck out of me to watch.

Norasmom Posted 11 Dec 2013 , 7:40pm
post #30 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrandisBaked 

They took a risk to do what they loved, and when it wasn't working, they called in help. I applaud them and wish them success. icon_biggrin.gif

Yes!  A lot of business almost fail before they succeed, even with a sturdy business plan.  I am personally witnessing this right now with a close friend.  

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