Boxes For Cookie Gifts

Decorating By AnnieCahill Updated 17 Jan 2015 , 3:01pm by Party Time

sweet111 Posted 11 Jan 2014 , 2:22am
post #61 of 68

Quote:

Originally Posted by liz at sugar 
 

Thought I would post what my finished/filled box looked like.  I fit 12 cookies in each box, of varying sizes.

 

 

I made up 74 boxes for a 2 hour event, and sold 60.  I was pleased with the results. :)

 

Liz

 

 

 

Those look amazing!! Yummmm!

 

How much would you charge for an assortment like that?

 

I charge for my biscotti and shortbreads 1.60 each? what do think too high/low?

 

Kelly

 

 

 

 

liz at sugar Posted 11 Jan 2014 , 4:58am
post #62 of 68

Quote:

Originally Posted by sweet111 
 

Those look amazing!! Yum!

 

How much would you charge for an assorted box like that?

 

Kelly

 

Hi Kelly - I charged $10 per box.  That price included the cost of the box, ribbon and label, the wrappers inside, and the 12 cookies.  Fully marked up product and labor and a healthy profit.

 

Liz

sweet111 Posted 11 Jan 2014 , 8:47pm
post #63 of 68

Hi Liz,

 

$10 only! they truly look amazing! 

 

Our average prices here in a Calgary is between $1.50 and $2.50 per cookie.

 

I still a little worried about my prices I charge $20 dozen mine are mostly nuts maybe 20% flour, an other lady I know who is also starting out is charging $2.00/cookie.

 

What do you think?

 

Kelly

liz at sugar Posted 11 Jan 2014 , 10:41pm
post #64 of 68

You need to figure out how much your product costs to make.  I do it slightly differently than some do here.  I figure out the exact cost of each ingredient in a batch (including packaging).  I add in the time it takes me to produce at a generous hourly wage, including my social security and tax payments.  I mark that total up by 3, and divide by how many items that batch produces.  I usually round up to the next .25 increment.  If for some reason my resulting retail price was lower than my competitors, then I would move up closer to that price.  I don't take any shortcuts with ingredients, so that rarely happens.

 

You need to run the numbers to know what to charge - no one else can do that for you.

 

Liz

 

P.S.  The retail cost of the cookies in that box was less than $8.  Add in my packaging and profit, and you get to $10.  There is no guesswork to it - straight math.

hbquikcomjamesl Posted 12 Jan 2014 , 3:39am
post #65 of 68

AYes. Even if you're not acting as a professional, and (as in my "wood type cookie" project over a year ago) only costing out something to be done as a volunteer, with reimbursement for ingredients, you still need to cost things out meticulously. Indeed, it becomes that much more important if you're not making any money on the project; otherwise, you could end up losing your shirt if sticker-shock makes the people paying for the ingredients balk.

MBalaska Posted 12 Jan 2014 , 4:15am
post #66 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by hbquikcomjamesl 

Yes. Even if you're not acting as a professional, and (as in my "wood type cookie" project over a year ago) only costing out something to be done as a volunteer, with reimbursement for ingredients, you still need to cost things out meticulously. Indeed, it becomes that much more important if you're not making any money on the project; otherwise, you could end up losing your shirt if sticker-shock makes the people paying for the ingredients balk.

James, we, the hobbyists, always pay more as we are not entitled to business rates ( properly so ) we don't buy in high volume, and don't produce in mass.

 

Get paid up front even if it is volunteer baking for a non-profit as in your case, is just plain good walking around sense.

mb

hbquikcomjamesl Posted 12 Jan 2014 , 5:24am
post #67 of 68

AYou get no arguments from me on that, "MBalaska." Except that in the case of the Printing Museum (where I donate thousands of dollars worth of my time each year, and make in-kind donations of materials without batting an eye), I feel that I can trust them: so far, the only times I haven't been reimbursed for materials I've bought for projects is when I declined to ask for reimbursement.

My point was that except for a few experimental batches, I didn't even begin the wood type cookie project until I knew exactly what the cost per cookie was, and how much they would have to reimburse me, and how much they'd have to charge at the concession stand, in order to raise a few bucks. And until I could be reasonably certain that I wouldn't be left holding the bag. (Although given that I'm a convenience they'd rather not do without, they have plenty of reasons not to get me mad at them.)

And in the aftermath, I made it clear that I wouldn't be repeating it unless I had help from other docents who baked (and could take on a share of the letters in their own kitchens); the whole project, rewarding as it was, was a royal pain in the butt (especially cleaning all those alphabet cookie cutters!).

-- JHHL

Party Time Posted 17 Jan 2015 , 3:01pm
post #68 of 68

Hi.  Your boxes are just beautiful, thank you for sharing.  Can you tell me please where the best place to purchase your sticker label for your boxes?  Thank you.  Robin Cahayla

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