Need Help With My First 3 D Cake

Decorating By amandadias Updated 22 Nov 2013 , 11:26pm by hbquikcomjamesl

7 replies
mfeagan Posted 20 Nov 2013 , 3:05pm
post #2 of 8

You may want to show your nephew some other options rather than a 3D cake if you have never made one. They are not very easy. It looks simple, but in reality, there is a lot of work that has to be done to achieve that look. Maybe a tiered cake with a small model of this little snail on top would be a better option. 

 

Not trying to judge your abilities or anything because I have no idea what you are capable of, but you are in for a lot of hours in basic structure work, sculpting, modeling, baking, then decorating. 

 

Keep in mind, this will have to be a pretty big cake if you want to feed more than just a few people. That cake ball you're thinking about won't feed many. 

 

I'm sure others out here can explain structure work better than me. I can make them, not explain them! :) 

Crazy-Gray Posted 20 Nov 2013 , 3:12pm
post #3 of 8

AYou could make a great 2D version carved out of a round cake as if the snail lying on its side?

Carol Roxy Posted 22 Nov 2013 , 9:20pm
post #4 of 8

You could use simple box cake mix, with a few tweaks to make it stand up to a lot of icing and a little imagination and a crumb coat layer is essential.

Smckinney07 Posted 22 Nov 2013 , 9:38pm
post #5 of 8

A

Original message sent by mfeagan

You may want to show your nephew some other options rather than a 3D cake if you have never made one. They are not very easy. It looks simple, but in reality, there is a lot of work that has to be done to achieve that look. Maybe a tiered cake with a small model of this little snail on top would be a better option. 

Not trying to judge your abilities or anything because I have no idea what you are capable of, but you are in for a lot of hours in basic structure work, sculpting, modeling, baking, then decorating. 

Keep in mind, this will have to be a pretty big cake if you want to feed more than just a few people. That cake ball you're thinking about won't feed many. 

I'm sure others out here can explain structure work better than me. I can make them, not explain them! :) 

I completely agree with the above statement, not to challenge your skills! It's just a big project for your first 3d cake.

As she said the cake you're thinking about wouldn't serve many people. I would make a 2D version or sculpt the character (which is super cute by the way!) and place on its own board so your nephew can keep or eat!

I would research internal supports/structures, check out 'The Cakerator' page (she does a lot of 3d cakes), just google and you'll get the idea how basic structures are created. Mike McCarry has a Craftsy class and DVDs you can purchase, he makes amazing 3d cakes.

I definitely recommend doing that before committing to a cake like this. Especially with well known or character cakes, if you get the proportions off just a little they'll look wrong. Lots of research and work involved!

Please don't take offense, if you feel you can do it then dive right in! I personally wouldn't attempt a cake if I can't look at it and say, "this is how it's done...I'll need this, that....". Or at least a general idea of how/were to begin.

hbquikcomjamesl Posted 22 Nov 2013 , 10:48pm
post #6 of 8

Look at that "S-car" go!

 

(And I hope you're not planning on an escargot-flavored cake!)

cheeseball Posted 22 Nov 2013 , 10:51pm
post #7 of 8

Quote:

Originally Posted by hbquikcomjamesl 
 

Look at that "S-car" go!

 

(And I hope you're not planning on an escargot-flavored cake!)

Oh, that's...bad

hbquikcomjamesl Posted 22 Nov 2013 , 11:26pm
post #8 of 8

Maybe so, but I'm firmly convinced that that old chestnut was the whole basis for Turbo.

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