jackiee70 Posted 14 Nov 2013 , 2:06am
post #1 of

14 replies
texas_mom Posted 14 Nov 2013 , 2:26am
post #2 of

They may have used this mold and then sprayed edible gold paint.

http://www.fancyflours.com/product/Chocolate-Covered-Oreos-Baby-Feet-Mold/Cookie-Molds

jgifford Posted 14 Nov 2013 , 12:51pm
post #3 of

Definitely a mold and spray, but then there's also ribbon around the edges.  Wonderful job on these!

mfeagan Posted 16 Nov 2013 , 1:30pm
post #4 of

It's a mold, possibly spray or a gold luster with some disco dust. I don't see ribbon at all.

Relznik Posted 16 Nov 2013 , 1:46pm
post #5 of

Quote:

Originally Posted by mfeagan 
 

It's a mold, possibly spray or a gold luster with some disco dust. I don't see ribbon at all.


No, me neither. x

Norasmom Posted 16 Nov 2013 , 3:00pm
post #6 of

I see the ribbon, now that it was pointed out.

AnnieCahill Posted 16 Nov 2013 , 4:29pm
post #7 of

I don't see ribbon either.  I think it's just the lines from the mold that was used.

LisaPeps Posted 16 Nov 2013 , 5:49pm
post #8 of

AI definitely see ribbon, you can see the subtle difference in colour on the pink one.

maybenot Posted 16 Nov 2013 , 8:46pm
post #9 of

No, there's no ribbon.  It's just a mark from the mold.

 

The person who makes these uses copious amounts of inedible disco dust to achieve this effect [I've seen her FB page].  The thought of deliberately ingesting that much plastic on a single oreo makes me sick.

Apti Posted 16 Nov 2013 , 8:48pm

I do not think there is a ribbon.  The molds that would produce EXACTLY those cookies can be found at Spinningleaf.com.  These are expensive, but excellent quality, and are one of the very, very, few chocolate molds that are deep enough.

http://shop.spinningleaf.com/Standard-Cookie-Mold-p/ck-2015.htm

 

 

The metallic sprays could be something similar to those available from Chefmaster.

http://www.globalsugarart.com/chefmaster-edible-metallic-spray-gold-p-24424.html

OR

be edible, metallic air brush sprays

 

I have about 6 of the Standard Cookie Molds from Spinning Leaf so I can have a quicker turnover when I'm making a lot of cookies.  I also like them because I can make small, molded chocolates and "glue" to the top.  This is MUCH faster than filling in a different color on the actual cookie mold.  Although Spinning Leaf shows a lot of two- and three-, and even four-colored chocolate cookies, in reality, it would take FOREVER to do them in multiple colors with a persnickity design. 

 

I have some photos of my very first Spinningleaf cookie molds here:

https://christinascakes.shutterfly.com/pictures/216

(I do them all the time, but I need to start taking photos!)

Apti Posted 16 Nov 2013 , 9:06pm

Here is an example of Americolor pink Sheen air brush color:

http://www.globalsugarart.com/air-brush-color-pink-sheen-ounces-by-americolor-p-22134.html?gclid=CIKV6tma6roCFU7ZQgodABYAgA&gdftrk=gdfV25706_a_7c2149_a_7c8856_a_7c22134

 

http://www.amazon.com/AmeriColor-AmeriMist-Edible-Airbrush-Colour/dp/B00CDBBSPA

Apti Posted 17 Nov 2013 , 7:29am
Quote:
Originally Posted by maybenot 
 

No, there's no ribbon.  It's just a mark from the mold.

 

The person who makes these uses copious amounts of inedible disco dust to achieve this effect [I've seen her FB page].  The thought of deliberately ingesting that much plastic on a single oreo makes me sick.


I just took a brief look at the FB page and did see a response by the baker that she uses disco dust:

 

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=407395326020391&set=a.358903127536278.82061.109064439186816&type=3&theater

 

Perhaps the oreos could be replicated with airbrush sheen colors over white chocolate.  I have recently made the decision not to use disco dust after doing a great deal of research.   Although I may have a differing personal opinion about what constitutes "edible", I do wish to say that this baker has FABULOUS skills overall and has an enormously impressive body of work.

 

The article that finally convinced me was from the UK.  One of the reasons that I thought disco dust may be ok was that it "is widely used in Europe and UK".  ooops......

 

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2133336/Storm-cupcake-How-innocent-question-glitter-edible-The-Great-British-Bake-Off-sparked-national-fairy-cake-pandemonium.html

Relznik Posted 17 Nov 2013 , 9:00am

Disco dust might be used in the UK, but it's supposed to be used on removable parts of the cake - so for example, a flower or something like that, which can be removed and won't be eaten.

mfeagan Posted 17 Nov 2013 , 2:13pm

Quote:

Originally Posted by maybenot 
 

No, there's no ribbon.  It's just a mark from the mold.

 

The person who makes these uses copious amounts of inedible disco dust to achieve this effect [I've seen her FB page].  The thought of deliberately ingesting that much plastic on a single oreo makes me sick.

 

There is a baker here who makes beautiful stuff including cake pops with which she coats with disco dust as well. They look awesome, but I can't imagine eating that much. I think many are under the impression that if the product is sold in a cake supply store or on a cake supply website that they are all meant to be eaten. 

SystemMod1 Posted 17 Nov 2013 , 7:35pm

Duplicate post.  Please only post one topic in a thread.

 

See:  http://cakecentral.com/t/765789/does-anyone-know-how-to-do-this-perfect-gold-covered-oreos

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%