gammie4two Posted 29 Oct 2013 , 8:25pm
post #1 of

Please do not think I am as stupid as my question, but where on the container does it say 35% or __% milk fat? Is it near the calories amount? I have read that it is heavy cream or whipping cream. Could someone give me a brand name like prefer to use? I am in Georgia, US., I use Kroger and Publix.

4 replies
Stitches Posted 29 Oct 2013 , 9:19pm
post #2 of

The container I have in front of me states it on the front label, but it could be on the back or near the Nutrition Facts. Most are 36%...I'm sure you just typo'ed that wrong. If the container says heavy whipping cream or whipping cream you've got the right thing (ultra pasteurized is good too).

 

BUT..............there's a little know fact that the actual butterfat content sometimes is less than or more than what's stated on the container.....depending upon the cows output (go ask the cows how that happens). I mention that only because I can't purchase heavy cream 36% from Costco. It doesn't ever whip correctly due to it's slightly lower butterfat content than the label says.

 

To get more nerdy technical (sorry I'm goofy sometimes).........you don't have to have an exact % of milk fat to make ganache, in fact you can make ganache with water or skim milk.

gammie4two Posted 29 Oct 2013 , 9:33pm
post #3 of

Thank you for your response. It was helpful.  I am wanting to use the ganache to spread over a cake then top with fondant.  The recipe is a bit different than the typical ganache.

Stitches Posted 29 Oct 2013 , 10:29pm
post #4 of

There can be a lot of variation in ganache recipes, surprisingly. If you are scared to try it, than post it and we can all look at it to help you (if possible). If not, maybe a quick site search under recipes here would help you.....

 

your choice....

sewsugarqueen Posted 29 Oct 2013 , 11:28pm
post #5 of

there is never a stupid question...it's whipping cream/heavy cream and I've bought here in Canada the cream and it did say 35%.  We have 1 %, 2 %,  homo (I think that' s 4 % milk......  homo is for homogenized or whole milk  ,.... what I would call regular milk.

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