SecretAgentCakeBaker Posted 25 Oct 2013 , 5:04am

AI have two separate questions here.

1- My daughter is attending an All Saints Day party next week and she wants to focus on Polish saints and bring Polish desserts. We found out that there is a candy called pańska skórka (The Lord's Crust) which is eaten on Nov. 1, so we will make those. Are there any other sweets or baked good that are eaten that day? http://easteuropeanfood.about.com/od/polishdesserts/r/Polish-Panska-Skorka-Candy-Recipe.htm

We also bought some krowki.

2-Next, we purchased some round, pastel colored wafers at the European market today. I had heard that one kind of Polish dessert using the wafers layers them with a Nutella type filling. I found two other possibilities, one mixes chocolate with sweetened condensed milk, and the other uses a caramel made from sweetened condensed milk. Any other ideas that are easy? We were going to just do the Nutella, but we cannot use nuts. Also, does anyone know what this is called? I saw mazurek, but I don't think that is the right name.

Thanks so much for your help!

12 replies
SecretAgentCakeBaker Posted 25 Oct 2013 , 5:06am

APS. I know this isn't the best forum for this question, but I get errors when I try to post in the recipe forum.

candyladies Posted 25 Oct 2013 , 11:56am

Anut/poppy seed rolls, angel wings...I would look for angel wing recipe,,,fried dough rolled in powder sugar...kids could help sugar them. Easy to grab and eat.

liz at sugar Posted 25 Oct 2013 , 12:25pm

Kolacz or Kolace or Kolacky?  I have a whole compilation cookbook that I thought was Polish, but it may be Czech.  Anyway, this is a pastry that you can fill with fruit or poppy seeds/nuts.  Like a danish.  I guess the Polish version has cream cheese in the dough.  I'm not sure if it is only for certain times of the year??

 

This recipe may be useless, but at least you'll get the idea:

 

Kolacky

1/2 cake yeast

1 lb butter

1/2 cup sugar

2 egg yolks

1 lg. pkg cream cheese

Dash salt

4 cups flour

1 tsp baking powder

 

Dissolve yeast in bit of warm water.  Mix all other ingredients and add to yeast mixture.  Chill overnight.

 

Roll out to 1/8" thick and cut with small glass.  Add desired filling.  Sprinkle with coconut.  Bake 10-12 minutes at 375 degrees.

 

Hope this helps.

 

Liz

alexius007 Posted 25 Oct 2013 , 3:45pm

Quote:

Originally Posted by liz at sugar 
 

Kolacz or Kolace or Kolacky?  I have a whole compilation cookbook that I thought was Polish, but it may be Czech.  Anyway, this is a pastry that you can fill with fruit or poppy seeds/nuts.  Like a danish.  I guess the Polish version has cream cheese in the dough.  I'm not sure if it is only for certain times of the year??

 

This recipe may be useless, but at least you'll get the idea:

 

Kolacky

1/2 cake yeast

1 lb butter

1/2 cup sugar

2 egg yolks

1 lg. pkg cream cheese

Dash salt

4 cups flour

1 tsp baking powder

 

Dissolve yeast in bit of warm water.  Mix all other ingredients and add to yeast mixture.  Chill overnight.

 

Roll out to 1/8" thick and cut with small glass.  Add desired filling.  Sprinkle with coconut.  Bake 10-12 minutes at 375 degrees.

 

Hope this helps.

 

Liz

I married into a Polish family and as far as I know, Kolacky is for whenever you want it!  My MIL used to make it every time she visited.  Our favorite is apricot preserves filling and a dusting of powdered sugar after they've been baked and cooled.  Ours are cut in a square with the corners folded up over the filling and slightly pinched together in the middle.  Warning though if you make them that you will want to eat them ALL.

liz at sugar Posted 25 Oct 2013 , 4:13pm

Quote:

Originally Posted by alexius007 
 

I married into a Polish family and as far as I know, Kolacky is for whenever you want it!  My MIL used to make it every time she visited.  Our favorite is apricot preserves filling and a dusting of powdered sugar after they've been baked and cooled.  Ours are cut in a square with the corners folded up over the filling and slightly pinched together in the middle.  Warning though if you make them that you will want to eat them ALL.

 

This must be a pretty popular Eastern European treat, because there is a whole chapter in this cookbook with Kolacky recipes.  (There seem to be a lot of spellings??) Every family must have their own tweaks on the idea, and there were lots of variations!

 

If anyone wants to try it, I would guess the cake yeast conversion should be between 1/2 and 1 packet of active dry yeast.

 

Liz

-K8memphis Posted 25 Oct 2013 , 4:13pm

i'm half polish and this thread reminds me of a conversation i had with with a french baker--i was saying how the polish are pastry lovers and how we have lots of specialties--and he said "name one" and after much thought ... i finally said, "danish!"

 

hahaha

 

but yeah kolatchy--but every nationality has those--the eastern european area overlaps with a lot of similar creations--something with a sweet poppy seed filling is particularly ethnic to me but there's not too many polish exclusives--

 

solo used to make a poppy seed filling--

 

some make sweet pierogis--

-K8memphis Posted 25 Oct 2013 , 4:16pm

Quote:

Originally Posted by liz at sugar 
 

 

This must be a pretty popular Eastern European treat, because there is a whole chapter in this cookbook with Kolacky recipes.  (There seem to be a lot of spellings??) Every family must have their own tweaks on the idea, and there were lots of variations!

 

If anyone wants to try it, I would guess the cake yeast conversion should be between 1/2 and 1 packet of active dry yeast.

 

Liz

 

 

yeah and you can make them with just a cream cheese, butter, flour dough without the yeast and it comes out like an apricot cookie that's called koh-LOTCH-key and yes 10,000 different spellings ;)

-K8memphis Posted 25 Oct 2013 , 4:23pm

exit 353 on i-35

 

http://www.czechstop.net/

 

my son went to school in austin--we'd go visit him from tn --but i'd say, hey we're going to the czech bakery so since we're close we're gonna stop by  & see you too  ;)

 

they make the yeasted ones there---mmmm

 

and mmm again!

nadushka Posted 25 Oct 2013 , 4:44pm

I am from Belaruss, we lived on the border with Warsaw and did the wafers all the time for the holidays. You can eat them anytime, but they were more of a holiday treat back home due to people not being able to afford to eat them often. We did a paste /cream out of boiled condenced milk. What you do is: put 1 can of condenced milk in water, bring to boil and let it boil on low for 3-4 hrs, adding water ones in a while. Take out of the water and let it cool completely, better overnight. Then you mix 1 teaspoon of lemon juice, 1.5 sticks of room temp unsalter butter and 1 can of boiled condenced milk, beat well for 3-4 minutes, I use my handheld mixer. Then you spread about 3-4 tablespoon on the wafer, spread evenly and place another wafer on top. I do about 4 wafers together, then start new wafer circle. 1 package can make about 1.5-2  4-piece wafer circles. Let them sit in refrigirator overnight, cut in to slices like a cake the next day. If you dont want to mess with boiling milk you can get already boiled condenced milk in your grocerie store, wal-mart has it in ethnic foods section, about $4 per can. Bon appetite. You can see them in my photo, that was for a wedding.

-K8memphis Posted 25 Oct 2013 , 4:53pm

they are beautiful-- and what a lovely spread

 

SecretAgentCakeBaker Posted 29 Oct 2013 , 11:44pm

AThanks everyone.

nadushka, your display is so pretty! My daughter especially loves how you mixed up the colors of the wafers, so she said she will do that too. I went back to the European shop and found a can of the pre-made dulce de leche from Ukraine, so we will use your recipe with that. I don't have much time to cook stuff at this point, so just assembling components will be the easiest. Turns out there are too many things on my calendar the next few days and just not enough time. Dumb calendar! Would love to make the angel wings, just too time consuming right now. My mom used to make those every Christmas.

nadushka Posted 30 Oct 2013 , 1:37pm

thank you, ladies :) Hope that helped.

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