MustangMollie Posted 23 Oct 2013 , 11:45am
post #1 of

AI'm very excited ... My cousin just asked me to make her father's 70th birthday cake!

This will be my first big cake, 85 people are coming. No pressure or anything, but my other cousin (the birthday guy's son) was a professional cake decorator for decades. He recently sold his shop though and moved to another state so logistically he can't make it.

My cousin offered to pay me for the cake, but I declined. I'm a hobbyist baker and I'm really honored to gave been asked.

Any suggestions would be welcome! For a tiered cake of rounds, how do I know what sizes to do to feed 85 people?

35 replies
bernerluv Posted 23 Oct 2013 , 12:37pm
post #2 of

This will give you an idea on servings...have fun!!!

 

http://www.wilton.com/cakes/making-cakes/baking-party-cake-2-inch-pans.cfm

CWR41 Posted 23 Oct 2013 , 12:52pm
post #3 of

http://www.wilton.com/cakes/making-cakes/baking-wedding-cake-2-inch-pans.cfm

sixinarow Posted 23 Oct 2013 , 1:00pm
post #4 of

Excited for you! Glad it's no extra pressure and it'll give you a big cake under your belt! :) Do as much prep before hand as possible, make sure you have plenty of extra fondant, buttercream, ganache (whatever you decide to use.) And write down a timeline for your baking/decorating. Ex. Mon..make buttercream, ganache, fondant and any decorations..Tues..bake, wrap, freeze. Weds..level,tort, fill, settle...writing it down will give you a good timeline goal and you can see if things are taking you longer to make adjustments before the last minute.

remnant3333 Posted 23 Oct 2013 , 1:09pm
post #5 of

 Just remember that the Wilton slices are super small. I think it is better to make your cake a little bigger. My motto is that I would rather have a little cake left over than not have enough cake. This is just me!!

 

I am sure you will do just fine with this cake!!! Please post pictures!! Good luck!!! You can do it!!!!

MustangMollie Posted 23 Oct 2013 , 9:24pm
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AThanks so much everyone for your help and encouragement!!! Those links are awesome and SOOOO helpful. Thank you!

DeliciousDesserts Posted 23 Oct 2013 , 10:52pm
post #7 of

AI they will be servin alcohol, I recommend a 6", 9", & 12".

MustangMollie Posted 24 Oct 2013 , 12:43am
post #8 of

Yes, there will be alcohol ... we're Aussie and live in wine country and the birthday guy loves whiskey. Just curious though, why will alcohol affect the size of the cakes needed? I haven't heard that before.

ammcats Posted 24 Oct 2013 , 12:53am
post #9 of

ALol, because alcohol makes you hungry. Don't think it actually affects cake size at all, but then again, things could be different in America :grin:

cindyaxiu Posted 24 Oct 2013 , 6:50am

so happy for you. Hope your cake can be praised by all the 85 people. i also like to making cook in my spare time.

 

 

 

yours sincerely

———————————————————---------------
joyce, a furniture designer from http://www.melodyhome.com/

goodvibrations Posted 24 Oct 2013 , 11:08am

Love this site for easy calculations!   https://www.bakingit.com/#sugarpaste

MustangMollie Posted 24 Oct 2013 , 10:08pm

I was thinking of doing a 12", 10", 8", and 6" ... does this sound like too much cake?

MustangMollie Posted 24 Oct 2013 , 10:10pm

Wow Goodvibrations! What an awesome link! I was wondering how much fondant I'm going to need ... thank you!!!

sixinarow Posted 24 Oct 2013 , 10:17pm

Quote:

Originally Posted by MustangMollie 
 

I was thinking of doing a 12", 10", 8", and 6" ... does this sound like too much cake?

That would give you 130 servings --  that would be a lot of extra cake. My Aussie friend, ApplegumPam, always says that American size slices are huge compared to the size you all serve, so I wouldn't worry about the wilton chart slice size being too small.

MustangMollie Posted 24 Oct 2013 , 11:07pm

AI just noticed that the Wilton serving guide s for a two layer cake. If I make a four layer cake will thus double the number of servings listed on the chart? If i do a 10" 8" 6" and 4" but each their has four layers will this be enough? Also, there are 70 adults and the rest kids, maybe I could just do cupcakes for the Kurds. What do you guys think about this?

MustangMollie Posted 24 Oct 2013 , 11:08pm

AThanks for pointing that out Six!

I just noticed that the Wilton serving guide s for a two layer cake. If I make a four layer cake will thus double the number of servings listed on the chart? If i do a 10" 8" 6" and 4" but each their has four layers will this be enough? Also, there are 70 adults and the rest kids, maybe I could just do cupcakes for the Kurds. What do you guys think about this?

BatterUpCake Posted 24 Oct 2013 , 11:13pm

You aren't going to want to put 4- 2" layers together if that is what you are talking about. If you are talking about 2 2" layers torted into 4 layers then it is the same as the Wilton

MustangMollie Posted 24 Oct 2013 , 11:22pm

AThanks ffor the clarification Batterup :)

sixinarow Posted 24 Oct 2013 , 11:28pm

A 10-8-6 will give you 74 servings -- you could add 2 doz cuppies and you would have plenty. For your first big cake, this would probably be a little less stressful but still a good sized cake for your portfolio. :)

BatterUpCake Posted 24 Oct 2013 , 11:29pm

No problem! I may have gotten my first wedding cake order. It is only a simple 8" & 6" iced cake with roses which I will purchase...but if it was any bigger I probably wouldn't take it without more experience under my belt. Hopefully I will have a signed contract by Monday!

MustangMollie Posted 24 Oct 2013 , 11:29pm

Batterup, I just got some dummy cakes ... 4 tiers ... the bottom tier and the second to top tier are 6" high and the other two are 4" high. How do I figure out how that would adjust serving sizes? Are there any special precautions that need to be taken when doing extra tall tiers?

BatterUpCake Posted 24 Oct 2013 , 11:34pm

any tier taller than 4" will require a cake board in there with supports. Of course you won't be serving dummy cakes. If you do a cake that is not 4" tall, like if you do a 6" tier and split it into 2 3" tiers you will have to figure out how many square inches would be equitable to the normal 4" serving.

MustangMollie Posted 24 Oct 2013 , 11:47pm

AThanks six! Great suggestion!

MustangMollie Posted 25 Oct 2013 , 12:25am

Thanks for the info BatterUp. I can't believe you're only about to do your first wedding cake ... you have so much knowledge!!! Fingers crossed that you get it. Please let us know!

 

If I do a 6" tier and split into 2 3" tiers do I ganache and fondant the 2 3" tiers separately? Add supports and stack? My design has a ribbon of fondant around the middle so you wouldn't be able to see the two stacked cakes, but it might make it easier for cutting.

sixinarow Posted 25 Oct 2013 , 12:31am

Quote:

Originally Posted by MustangMollie 
 

Thanks for the info BatterUp. I can't believe you're only about to do your first wedding cake ... you have so much knowledge!!! Fingers crossed that you get it. Please let us know!

 

If I do a 6" tier and split into 2 3" tiers do I ganache and fondant the 2 3" tiers separately? Add supports and stack? My design has a ribbon of fondant around the middle so you wouldn't be able to see the two stacked cakes, but it might make it easier for cutting.

If you google "extended tier" you'll get tutorials on how to stack and cover it. You can stack and ganache it all at once or you can ganache separately, then stack and fill the seam. Cover in fondant  when it's stacked together either by paneling or going over the top like usual.

MustangMollie Posted 25 Oct 2013 , 12:33am

I could modify the design a bit ... 

 

6" round, 8" high = 24 serves

8" round, 4" high = 20 serves

10" round, 8 " high = 56 serves

 

This configuration would yield 100 serves.

I might still add a 4" round on top for visual effect. I'm really liking the 4 tier look at the moment, but that might be a bit much.

 

If I stack on site do I need to drive a sharpened dowel through the entire height of the cake? I haven't done that before and it makes me nervous! I've heard great things about the SPS system but I haven't found it available for sale anywhere in Australia.

 

I'll post a few of my sketches later today.

MustangMollie Posted 25 Oct 2013 , 12:33am

Thanks Six! I don't know what on earth I'd do without you ladies!!! :)

BatterUpCake Posted 25 Oct 2013 , 1:45am

Quote:

Originally Posted by MustangMollie 
 

Thanks for the info BatterUp. I can't believe you're only about to do your first wedding cake ... you have so much knowledge!!! Fingers crossed that you get it. Please let us know!

 

If I do a 6" tier and split into 2 3" tiers do I ganache and fondant the 2 3" tiers separately? Add supports and stack? My design has a ribbon of fondant around the middle so you wouldn't be able to see the two stacked cakes, but it might make it easier for cutting.

I have "book" knowledge. Mostly from reading advice on here from respected bakers. I am still very green and learning more everyday. I have done 2 tier stacked cakes, but never one for a wedding which for some reason in my mind makes it different!

 

When I did a 6" tier I iced it to appear to lock as a single tier but used the normal supports in between the 2 3" tiers.

MustangMollie Posted 25 Oct 2013 , 1:46am

A[IMG ALT=""]http://cakecentral.com/content/type/61/id/3126617/width/350/height/700[/IMG]

Here is the sketch that I've come up with :)

MustangMollie Posted 25 Oct 2013 , 1:52am

Yeah, I can see how weddings could be a bit intimidating because there's not a 'do over.' I think it would be a lot more pressure. I'm sure you'll do great though!

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