weluvpiggies Posted 15 Oct 2013 , 3:42pm
post #1 of

I'm sorry if this is a dumb question!! :oops: But...I found some 'bling' in the ribbon area of the craft store that I'd love to use as a bottom border on a cake.  After I got home I realized that the back of  the 'crystals' are metal.  Since I know you shouldn't insert metal INTO a cake, I was wondering if it's ok to use something metal as a border ON a cake?

Thanks in advance for your replies! :D 

5 replies
-K8memphis Posted 15 Oct 2013 , 3:47pm
post #2 of

if it is food safe and you would put it on your baby's food before you fed the baby

 

would probably be pretty as the trim around the cake board too

dynee Posted 15 Oct 2013 , 4:13pm
post #3 of

There are ways of getting around the metal touching the cake.  You could use a double size cakeboard so the metal is touching the board instead of the cake,  You could put on a border of fondant the same size as the trim and attach it to that so you could remove it easily or you could cut a strip of wax paper the same size as the trim.

mfeagan Posted 15 Oct 2013 , 5:33pm
post #4 of

I have also seen bakers put ribbon on the cake first then add the glam ribbon on top of the other ribbon. That would ensure metal would not touch the cake. I also like the waxed paper idea.

hbquikcomjamesl Posted 15 Oct 2013 , 6:15pm
post #5 of

Uh, and why would you not insert food-safe metal (my favorite example being a skewer out of a turkey lacing kit) into a cake?

And as to food-safe metal touching the cake or frosting, well, cake pans are usually made of metal, so you have metal touching the cake before it even makes it into the oven. And informal cakes are frequently served in-pan, so you end up, unless you're really neat with the frosting, with metal touching the frosting.

 

The key question is whether or not the metal is food-safe. And personally, I wouldn't trust anything not specifically marketed as being for food contact, regardless of whether it's metal, plastic, wood, ceramic (remember, serving food on most "collectors' plates" is not good for the food, or the plate!), stone, or glass, unless I knew the exact composition, and where it's been.

weluvpiggies Posted 15 Oct 2013 , 9:53pm
post #6 of

Ok, I see the point now.  I mean, we do eat with metal forks and cut the cake with a metal knife, right?  So, point is that we are unsure of the metal on the 'ribbon' so maybe best to have it not touch the cake.  Thanks!

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