Debbie Bear Posted 12 Oct 2013 , 9:35pm
post #1 of

Do you let your fondant dry before you cut it out into shapes or figures? I can never get mine to cut clean and when it's still fresh, the cuts all seem to drag HELP!:-D

20 replies
CakeChemistry Posted 12 Oct 2013 , 9:50pm
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ADo you use tylo?

lisaelanna Posted 12 Oct 2013 , 10:37pm
post #3 of

I have had worse results with cutting fondant the longer it has been out.  But what I would recommend from my experience is getting a sharper tool.  I was using the wilton roller for a long time and always having that issue of having torn-looking edges.  After seeing someone else use one on a tutorial I went out and bought a small scalpel and that has made a ton of difference (although you do have to be careful what surface you're cutting on with the scalpel).  I have also noticed that if you make sure that you have a very clean blade the cuts turn out cleaner. Now I keep a damp kitchen towel or paper towel around to wipe off my blade after I make a cut.

cupcakemaker Posted 12 Oct 2013 , 10:49pm
post #4 of

ATry rubbing on a foam pad before pushing out.

BrandisBaked Posted 12 Oct 2013 , 10:55pm
post #5 of

AI would recommend using modeling chocolate instead. You'll get much better results.

JWinslow Posted 12 Oct 2013 , 11:00pm
post #6 of

Quote:

Originally Posted by lisaelanna 
 

I have had worse results with cutting fondant the longer it has been out.  But what I would recommend from my experience is getting a sharper tool.  I was using the wilton roller for a long time and always having that issue of having torn-looking edges.  After seeing someone else use one on a tutorial I went out and bought a small scalpel and that has made a ton of difference (although you do have to be careful what surface you're cutting on with the scalpel).  I have also noticed that if you make sure that you have a very clean blade the cuts turn out cleaner. Now I keep a damp kitchen towel or paper towel around to wipe off my blade after I make a cut.

 

I use a self healing cutting mat - works great!  Also for smaller cuts I find a regular razor blade or box cutter blade works wonders for small straight cuts.

sarahgale314 Posted 13 Oct 2013 , 12:54am
post #7 of

A

Original message sent by BrandisBaked

I would recommend using modeling chocolate instead. You'll get much better results.

Ditto.

Debbie Bear Posted 22 Oct 2013 , 7:56am
post #8 of

Just ordered some!  THANKS! :D

Debbie Bear Posted 22 Oct 2013 , 7:57am
post #9 of

Got the cutting mat and Box cutters in 3 different sizes!  THANKS!:D

Debbie Bear Posted 22 Oct 2013 , 7:59am

Quote:

Originally Posted by BrandisBaked 

I would recommend using modeling chocolate instead. You'll get much better results.

What exact kind do you use?  Do you make your own?  I am new to this and have only used fondant..I see and hear about modeling chocolate all the time...just not sure what it is.....Thanks!:D

Debbie Bear Posted 22 Oct 2013 , 8:00am

Quote:

Originally Posted by JWinslow 
 

 

I use a self healing cutting mat - works great!  Also for smaller cuts I find a regular razor blade or box cutter blade works wonders for small straight cuts.

Got the cutting mat and Box cutters in 3 different sizes!  THANKS!:D

Debbie Bear Posted 22 Oct 2013 , 8:01am

Quote:

Originally Posted by CakeChemistry 

Do you use tylo?

Just ordered some!  THANKS! :D

BrandisBaked Posted 22 Oct 2013 , 11:17am

AI make my own. It's incredibly easy and inexpensive.

sarahgale314 Posted 22 Oct 2013 , 2:32pm

AModeling chocolate

If using compound coating (such as candy melts or "Almond Bark" brand coating, or real white chocolate:

1 pound candy coating 3.5 oz (by weight) corn syrup

If using real milk or dark chocolate:

1 pound chocolate 5.6 oz (by weight) corn syrup

Place the compound coating or chocolate in a medium bowl and microwave in 30 second intervals, stirring, until melted. Add the corn syrup and fold in gently with a spatula, until it forms a soft dough. Turn the dough out onto a piece of plastic wrap set on your counter and use the spatula to smooth the dough into an even layer, about 1/2 inch thick. Let cool 1 hour, then knead like bread dough until it makes a smooth ball. Wrap in plastic wrap, then place in a zip bag until ready to use. You can knead in gel food colors just like with fondant and gumpaste.

Troubleshooting: if your modeling chocolate is too crumbly and firm, place it in a bowl, microwave 15 seconds to warm it, and add an additional tablespoon of corn syrup. Knead it in, then wrap and let it cool.

If your modeling chocolate is too soft, melt an additional ounce of chocolate, knead it in, then wrap and let it cool.

MommyMommy Posted 23 Oct 2013 , 3:08am

is this recipe in the recipe section so members can favorite it?  does modeling chocolate feel/work like fondant? is it better to use one for somethings and the other for others?  ex. i once made a sculpted dragon cake w fondant wings  

sarahgale314 Posted 23 Oct 2013 , 2:10pm

AIt's not in the recipe section. It's my own recipe. Modeling chocolate isn't stretchy, like fondant, so you can make cut out shapes with it and they won't get distorted as you put them on the cake. It can melt in heat, though, since it's made of chocolate. It doesn't dry hard like fondant or gumpaste, but it will get harder as it cools. When you pull it out to work with it, especially if it's been in a cool place, it will be quite hard and even crumbly, but use the heat of your hands to warm it, and it will soften up. Then, as it cools back down after you've cut a shape, it will harden back up.

soldiernurse Posted 23 Oct 2013 , 3:50pm

Quote:

Originally Posted by sarahgale314 

It's not in the recipe section. It's my own recipe. Modeling chocolate isn't stretchy, like fondant, so you can make cut out shapes with it and they won't get distorted as you put them on the cake. It can melt in heat, though, since it's made of chocolate. It doesn't dry hard like fondant or gumpaste, but it will get harder as it cools. When you pull it out to work with it, especially if it's been in a cool place, it will be quite hard and even crumbly, but use the heat of your hands to warm it, and it will soften up. Then, as it cools back down after you've cut a shape, it will harden back up.

 

 

Can you mix it with mmf..like 50/50? or with tylose to keep it hard?

sarahgale314 Posted 23 Oct 2013 , 5:16pm

AI have never tried. The flowers and things I've made out of it are hard enough after sitting for a couple of hours.

AnnieCahill Posted 23 Oct 2013 , 7:29pm

I hand-cut fondant all the time, but what I use is a mixture of Duff's (FondX) and Wilton.  Duff's makes it taste better but you get the workability of Wilton.  I roll it out, let it dry for a half hour or so, then go to town.

soldiernurse Posted 23 Oct 2013 , 7:29pm

Quote:

Originally Posted by sarahgale314 

I have never tried. The flowers and things I've made out of it are hard enough after sitting for a couple of hours.

 

 

just wondering about mixing it with fondant and using it to cover an entire cake...adding chocolate's positives to the sometimes troublesome fondant seems to be a good idea--at least in theory!!  WAM...I think I do remember something about that...somewhere??

sarahgale314 Posted 23 Oct 2013 , 9:01pm

AFondarific brand fondant is a mix of modeling chocolate and fondant, but not 50-50 - I believe it's more like 70-30 fondant to modeling chocolate. You'll want to look it up to make sure of the ratio. I make completely from scratch fondant, not marshmallow fondant, and it is very nice to work with, and colors really well, since the base liquid is clear, not dyed white like marshmallows and commercial white fondant are.

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