nielove Posted 10 Oct 2013 , 3:59pm
post #1 of

A[IMG ALT=""]http://cakecentral.com/content/type/61/id/3117705/width/350/height/700[/IMG]

I am new to specialty cakes but I've always loved to bake and decorate cakes. I have made this cake for my cousins baby shower and considering going into the specialty cake world. How much would you charge for a cake like this?

18 replies
-K8memphis Posted 10 Oct 2013 , 4:19pm
post #3 of

Quote:

Originally Posted by nielove 



I am new to specialty cakes but I've always loved to bake and decorate cakes. I have made this cake for my cousins baby shower and considering going into the specialty cake world. How much would you charge for a cake like this?

 

how big is it?

nielove Posted 10 Oct 2013 , 4:30pm
post #4 of

AIt's not that big.. Including the cupcakes it served about 30 people...

CakeRae80 Posted 10 Oct 2013 , 4:59pm
post #5 of

Everyone has different pricing depending on their circumstances, ie. overhead, area, supplies, etc. In my area, my pregnant belly cake I do which I think serves about 30-35 I sell for $75 for just the cake.  But I'm in a smaller area city wise. :)

nielove Posted 10 Oct 2013 , 5:08pm
post #6 of

AI live in the new york city area. I was told to price that cake for the price you charge. I used two kinds of cake flavors, chocolate and vanilla cake. I just ordered some edible bling for another belly cake that I'm going to do next month. I was thinking of charging maybe $60.

CakeRae80 Posted 10 Oct 2013 , 5:17pm
post #7 of

Quote:

Originally Posted by nielove 

I live in the new york city area. I was told to price that cake for the price you charge. I used two kinds of cake flavors, chocolate and vanilla cake. I just ordered some edible bling for another belly cake that I'm going to do next month. I was thinking of charging maybe $60.

Where did you find edible bling from?  That sounds like something I would want for my friend's cake next year when she turns 40.  We love bling...lol

nielove Posted 10 Oct 2013 , 5:47pm
post #8 of

AGlobalsugarart.com I ordered this [IMG ALT=""]http://cakecentral.com/content/type/61/id/3117753/width/350/height/700[/IMG]

nielove Posted 10 Oct 2013 , 5:49pm
post #9 of

AThey have edible sugar diamonds and gems!!!!! Perfect of decorating cakes....

CakeRae80 Posted 10 Oct 2013 , 5:49pm

Oh WOW! Love it, thank you, I will deff look into these.

nielove Posted 10 Oct 2013 , 6:01pm

A

Original message sent by CakeRae80

Oh WOW! Love it, thank you, I will deff look into these.

Your very welcome!!!!!

Kathy107 Posted 16 Oct 2013 , 7:39pm

Nielove, I am in the NYC area too.  That cake is so pretty.  You should charge at least $100.

DeliciousDesserts Posted 16 Oct 2013 , 8:21pm

AMost of us agree that tossing a number at someone, who asks how to price a cake, does them a disservice. I'm in the teach a man to fish boat so to speak. Here is my heartfelt and knowledgeable advice. In order to set your pricing, you really do have to do your homework. Sit down & write a list of every single thing your hands touched while making that last cake. Did you use a hand towel? Do you have to wash that towel? Aprons, hand soap, dishwasher, dish soap, oven, water, trash can....EVERY single thing no matter how small it may seem. Of course, you will also add the cost of ingredients. If you are a legal business, you will need to add the cost of licensing and insurance. This should, quite frankly, be a very very long list. You should also do some research into your competition. Found someone with comparable skills as yours and check to see how much they charge. Don't copy this!! It's possible they are not charging correctly. It will, however, give you valuable information in comparing. Some people will encourage you that home bakers or Cottage Food Law bakers shouldn't charge the same as a brick & mortar bakery. Really? My question is do you have the same costs? Sure, you don't have the same lease payments. You also don't get the discounts of purchasing power. I'm not saying they equal out. The only way to know is to have an accurate accounting of your true cost. Remember that the goal is to make a profit. Covering costs does not equate to a successful business. Sure you want to make people happy, you want them to enjoy your cake. As a business, you should also make a profit. We aren't talking price gouging, but you really do deserve to make a profit. Stop feeling guilty about it! You don't have to have a masters in business, but I do recommend you at least have a business plan. At the very least, educate yourself about the true costs of producing your cake.

cakeyouverymuch Posted 16 Oct 2013 , 11:00pm

Quote:

Originally Posted by DeliciousDesserts 

Most of us agree that tossing a number at someone, who asks how to price a cake, does them a disservice. I'm in the teach a man to fish boat so to speak.

Here is my heartfelt and knowledgeable advice. In order to set your pricing, you really do have to do your homework. Sit down & write a list of every single thing your hands touched while making that last cake. Did you use a hand towel? Do you have to wash that towel? Aprons, hand soap, dishwasher, dish soap, oven, water, trash can....EVERY single thing no matter how small it may seem. Of course, you will also add the cost of ingredients. If you are a legal business, you will need to add the cost of licensing and insurance. This should, quite frankly, be a very very long list.

You should also do some research into your competition. Found someone with comparable skills as yours and check to see how much they charge. Don't copy this!! It's possible they are not charging correctly. It will, however, give you valuable information in comparing.

Some people will encourage you that home bakers or Cottage Food Law bakers shouldn't charge the same as a brick & mortar bakery. Really? My question is do you have the same costs? Sure, you don't have the same lease payments. You also don't get the discounts of purchasing power. I'm not saying they equal out. The only way to know is to have an accurate accounting of your true cost.

Remember that the goal is to make a profit. Covering costs does not equate to a successful business. Sure you want to make people happy, you want them to enjoy your cake. As a business, you should also make a profit. We aren't talking price gouging, but you really do deserve to make a profit. Stop feeling guilty about it!

You don't have to have a masters in business, but I do recommend you at least have a business plan. At the very least, educate yourself about the true costs of producing your cake.

 

 

THIS!

cakesbycathy Posted 17 Oct 2013 , 12:43am

Quote:

Originally Posted by DeliciousDesserts 

Most of us agree that tossing a number at someone, who asks how to price a cake, does them a disservice. I'm in the teach a man to fish boat so to speak.

Here is my heartfelt and knowledgeable advice. In order to set your pricing, you really do have to do your homework. Sit down & write a list of every single thing your hands touched while making that last cake. Did you use a hand towel? Do you have to wash that towel? Aprons, hand soap, dishwasher, dish soap, oven, water, trash can....EVERY single thing no matter how small it may seem. Of course, you will also add the cost of ingredients. If you are a legal business, you will need to add the cost of licensing and insurance. This should, quite frankly, be a very very long list.

You should also do some research into your competition. Found someone with comparable skills as yours and check to see how much they charge. Don't copy this!! It's possible they are not charging correctly. It will, however, give you valuable information in comparing.

Some people will encourage you that home bakers or Cottage Food Law bakers shouldn't charge the same as a brick & mortar bakery. Really? My question is do you have the same costs? Sure, you don't have the same lease payments. You also don't get the discounts of purchasing power. I'm not saying they equal out. The only way to know is to have an accurate accounting of your true cost.

Remember that the goal is to make a profit. Covering costs does not equate to a successful business. Sure you want to make people happy, you want them to enjoy your cake. As a business, you should also make a profit. We aren't talking price gouging, but you really do deserve to make a profit. Stop feeling guilty about it!

You don't have to have a masters in business, but I do recommend you at least have a business plan. At the very least, educate yourself about the true costs of producing your cake.


I think we should just copy and paste this anytime someone asks "How much should I charge for my cake?"

DeliciousDesserts Posted 17 Oct 2013 , 1:32am

A*blush*. Aww thanks.

That's exactly what I did. Cut & pasted it from the thread where I originally posted. It's now my only answer. Otherwise, the thread will make me crazy.

longduo Posted 17 Oct 2013 , 6:20am

I used two kinds of cake flavors, chocolate and vanilla cake. I just ordered some edible bling for another belly cake that I'm going to do next month.

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nielove Posted 17 Oct 2013 , 6:58pm

A

Original message sent by Kathy107

Nielove, I am in the NYC area too.  That cake is so pretty.  You should charge at least $100.

Thank you!!! I'm making another one in blue with the bling instead of the flowers for my next one. Thank you. That was my first prego belly cake. :-)

nielove Posted 17 Oct 2013 , 7:01pm

A

Original message sent by DeliciousDesserts

Most of us agree that tossing a number at someone, who asks how to price a cake, does them a disservice. I'm in the teach a man to fish boat so to speak. Here is my heartfelt and knowledgeable advice. In order to set your pricing, you really do have to do your homework. Sit down & write a list of every single thing your hands touched while making that last cake. Did you use a hand towel? Do you have to wash that towel? Aprons, hand soap, dishwasher, dish soap, oven, water, trash can....EVERY single thing no matter how small it may seem. Of course, you will also add the cost of ingredients. If you are a legal business, you will need to add the cost of licensing and insurance. This should, quite frankly, be a very very long list. You should also do some research into your competition. Found someone with comparable skills as yours and check to see how much they charge. Don't copy this!! It's possible they are not charging correctly. It will, however, give you valuable information in comparing. Some people will encourage you that home bakers or Cottage Food Law bakers shouldn't charge the same as a brick & mortar bakery. Really? My question is do you have the same costs? Sure, you don't have the same lease payments. You also don't get the discounts of purchasing power. I'm not saying they equal out. The only way to know is to have an accurate accounting of your true cost. Remember that the goal is to make a profit. Covering costs does not equate to a successful business. Sure you want to make people happy, you want them to enjoy your cake. As a business, you should also make a profit. We aren't talking price gouging, but you really do deserve to make a profit. Stop feeling guilty about it! You don't have to have a masters in business, but I do recommend you at least have a business plan. At the very least, educate yourself about the true costs of producing your cake.

Very True!!!!

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