Next Biggest Trend?

Decorating By petitetreats729 Updated 17 Nov 2013 , 6:58pm by JWinslow

petitetreats729 Posted 16 Oct 2013 , 8:12pm
post #91 of 136

I did not realize how many responses this post generated :) I love everyone's take on this subject. Cupcakes are quite easy to decorate and I think it is correct to say that this is what sparked the craze. However, developing my recipes and the hundreds of little fondant and gumpaste details I have had to make for each little cupcake...I wouldn't say it was always the easiest. I think in general though cupcakes are easy for people to master. Cake pops were fun, but I find them to be too sweet. I've seen "naked cakes" recently trending, but I really don't care for them too much. Most trends are old ideas made new and I love looking through all the older cake books; comparing the old ideas and techniques to todays modern versions. I think everyone has made some great points :)

Stitches Posted 16 Oct 2013 , 9:26pm
post #92 of 136

Did anyone see the article that Vera Wang is really selling colored wedding dresses? Specifically shades of pink for next year. I wonder if pink is the new "in" color for 2014?

sarahgale314 Posted 16 Oct 2013 , 10:07pm
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AI hope so! I love pink!

MustangMollie Posted 16 Oct 2013 , 10:11pm
post #94 of 136

I'm not a huge fan of macaroons, but they're very popular at the moment. Even McDonalds is selling them at their McCafe! I think the next big trend will be the push pop cakes. :)

CakeChemistry Posted 16 Oct 2013 , 10:21pm
post #95 of 136

AIn terms of very traditional styles being made modern, check this guy out from Liverpool, UK, http://www.davidcakes.co.uk/glamorous_luxury_bespoke_society_wedding_celebrity_cake_maker.html He does stuff with royal that is extremely extravagant. To me, some of it, though admirable, does seem over the top and dated, but if extravagance is a measure of wealth, this guy is coining it in. I'm not denigrating his skill, he is clearly an artist, it's just not to my taste. I'd love to know how much one of these is charged out as!

CakeChemistry Posted 16 Oct 2013 , 10:23pm
post #96 of 136

A"Extravagance=wealth" statement. Contradiction in terms. Sorry. Hope you understand what I mean from the context x x x

IowaBaker Posted 16 Oct 2013 , 10:43pm
post #97 of 136

AMAZING, although I don't think I'll attempt it!

CakeChemistry Posted 16 Oct 2013 , 11:01pm
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AI know! Ever so slightly insane! I wondered whether the cakes might bit rock solid to try and cut into? Surely not though? Would defeat the object eh?

MustangMollie Posted 16 Oct 2013 , 11:46pm
post #99 of 136

Is that English overpiping? His skills are amazing! I love the dropdown netting effect that he did with piping!

smittyditty Posted 17 Oct 2013 , 12:22am
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I see pink being a trend due to Downton Abbey and Gatsby both eras served pale pink with style. Overpiping is trying to become a trend but I'm not sure if brides are buying it.
I did see the Very Wang gowns. So pretty. I actually had picked my first wedding dress 8 years ago that was pink with hand painted roses the size of your hand. If you could imagine it it was gorgeous. Couldn't get it in time.

MBalaska Posted 17 Oct 2013 , 12:29am
post #101 of 136

Quote:

Originally Posted by CakeChemistry 

In terms of very traditional styles being made modern, check this guy out from Liverpool, UK, http://www.davidcakes.co.uk/glamorous_luxury_bespoke_society_wedding_celebrity_cake_maker.html
He does stuff with royal that is extremely extravagant. To me, some of it, though admirable, does seem over the top and dated, but if extravagance is a measure of wealth, this guy is coining it in. I'm not denigrating his skill, he is clearly an artist, it's just not to my taste. I'd love to know how much one of these is charged out as!

Next biggest trend? what this guy is doing is right out of my 30 year old Wilton decorating books.

Old school piping.

 

maybe the Ultra Mega Rich are going back to time consuming hand piped vintage old school decorations 'cause Fondant/Gumpaste is now common place. Who knows.

IAmPamCakes Posted 17 Oct 2013 , 1:00am
post #102 of 136

AI would love I see old school piping come back. It could help weed out some 'decorators' who only know how to push fondant into molds and claim it's a masterpiece. No offense, but I don't call that real-honest-to-goodness decorating. I'm no expert piper, but I'm always trying new techniques so I can do something no one else in my area does.

MommyMommy Posted 17 Oct 2013 , 1:21am
post #103 of 136

AHe has some beautiful cakes. Wow. I could def see this as a comeback (the piping). Anything old fashioned, but not exactly the same.

As just a mom here n there baker - anything involving skill will always hold value! And decorated cookies - the dress ones I saw recently - love love love. And those gorgeous hand painted flowered teacup cupcakes! Just lovely! And petit fors. Sorry my Vintage craving is showing. But then again if I saw it everywhere I might be turned off.

sarahgale314 Posted 17 Oct 2013 , 2:12am
post #104 of 136

APetits Fours! love them! I made these today:

[IMG ALT="Two thin layers of soft, moist vanilla cake, filled with rich and creamy vanilla French buttercream, and glazed with white chocolate poured fondant."]http://cakecentral.com/content/type/61/id/3121822/width/200/height/400[/IMG]

Sweetasyou Posted 17 Oct 2013 , 2:00pm
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AI love her website!

Her tutorials are super easy.

Sweetasyou Posted 17 Oct 2013 , 2:10pm
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AI so agree with you!

If I can get it at Michaels or Hobby Lobby, I don't want it!

You know the chevon, animal prints, cutesy stuff you see all over Etsy.

theresaf Posted 17 Oct 2013 , 3:02pm
post #107 of 136

I love all that white on white or same color on same color piping/designs.  I'm just saying this from a hobby perspective but the end results are so beautiful to me - I think that's going to be the overall design of my own birthday cake coming up!  Plus I love buttercream more than fondant so I'm all for a buttercream trend!

Theresa

costumeczar Posted 17 Oct 2013 , 4:20pm
post #108 of 136

It's sad that buttercream is even bieng discussed as a trend...I'm with IAmPamCakes on the subject of people needing to learn how to pipe a straight line, I hadn't realized until recently how rare piping skills are these days. I've done a ton of piped lace cakes recently, and I'm always surprised at the number of comments that I get when I post a photo. I finally figured out that it's because people don't learn how to pipe icing anymore, so it looks like an exotic skill.

embersmom Posted 17 Oct 2013 , 9:50pm
post #109 of 136

Quote:

Originally Posted by costumeczar 
 

It's sad that buttercream is even bieng discussed as a trend...I'm with IAmPamCakes on the subject of people needing to learn how to pipe a straight line, I hadn't realized until recently how rare piping skills are these days. I've done a ton of piped lace cakes recently, and I'm always surprised at the number of comments that I get when I post a photo. I finally figured out that it's because people don't learn how to pipe icing anymore, so it looks like an exotic skill.


Amen :nodding:  I would never put myself in the same league as the link mentioned upthread, but I consider myself stronger with piping than fondant.  I've seldom done fondant at work, so 99.9% of my experience is with buttercream.

BrandisBaked Posted 17 Oct 2013 , 9:59pm
post #110 of 136

AAs someone who learned to decorate before fondant was the rage (I did my first cake in 1991) I am totally jealous that decorators have it so easy - fondant, molds, onlays, craftsy, etc.

I do think buttercream is like a dying art though. And when people do think of buttercream, they think of the simply grocery store style cakes.

kikiandkyle Posted 17 Oct 2013 , 10:06pm
post #111 of 136

AWell I did get into a fight with someone on here recently who said that decorators who use fondant are lazy and I stand by my defense of fondant - at least those that do a good job of it. Judging by how many wrecks we see on here that are fondant covered, getting it right is definitely a skill just as good piping is.

BrandisBaked Posted 17 Oct 2013 , 10:26pm
post #112 of 136

AWell, I never said anything about lazy - but it is much faster and easier having so many tools and resources that weren't available when I started decorating. Nothing wrong with using the newest and latest to make beautiful cakes - but there's also no harm in admitting that without these tools and resources 20 years ago, decorators had to be more "resourceful" and had a harder time perfecting the craft.

-K8memphis Posted 17 Oct 2013 , 10:32pm
post #113 of 136

i think being able to pipe well enough to pipe a rose carries such an important feeling for a caker--an empowerment--i don't think i could feel fully authorized on the inside without the ability to pipe a rose--

 

i do not at all think 'fondant only' peeps are less in any way than any other caker--i just think most everyone on the planet wants to pipe something--even deviled eggs or mashed potatoes--

 

piping be fun--tons of fun

kikiandkyle Posted 17 Oct 2013 , 11:20pm
post #114 of 136

AIt wasn't anyone on this thread, it was over in cookies. I told her it was insulting and she said I was paranoid. #okthen

embersmom Posted 17 Oct 2013 , 11:24pm
post #115 of 136

Quote:

Originally Posted by BrandisBaked 

As someone who learned to decorate before fondant was the rage (I did my first cake in 1991) I am totally jealous that decorators have it so easy - fondant, molds, onlays, craftsy, etc.

I do think buttercream is like a dying art though. And when people do think of buttercream, they think of the simply grocery store style cakes.


I absolutely agree.

 

I'm not in any way putting down people who primarily use fondant because there's an art to using it well.  OTOH I think it takes a lot of finesse to be able to pipe well.

 

One reason why "grocery style" cakes are as simple as they are is because nowadays they cut out a lot of the piping techniques you and I learned back in the day.

MommyMommy Posted 18 Oct 2013 , 3:36am
post #116 of 136

AFondant or Buttercream - it is very evident the pros vs. the rest of us!

CakieSweets Posted 18 Oct 2013 , 4:04am
post #117 of 136

I've seen the cake push pop start a bit of a stir, but I find it to be wasteful in the packaging department. I see cake pops becoming more popular. I'm surprised the square shaped cupcakes didn't get very far. I really like those.

cazza1 Posted 18 Oct 2013 , 10:06am
post #118 of 136

In Australia we have used fondant for forever.  We did not use buttercream (that was American) and royal Icing (that was English) for covering our cakes.  We did pipe with royal icing, however, and if you look back in the old books you will see that us fondant Aussies created the most magnificent delicate looking masterpieces (well maybe not me personally but I do have some passable attempts). I personally think that they left the American Style piped buttercream cakes of the same era for dead. Unfortunately, you very rarely see Extension Work (dubbed Australian String Work by Americans) with Lace edging anymore because it is extremely time consuming and I dare say very few people would be prepared to pay for it, whereas 35 years ago that was what everyone had.

costumeczar Posted 18 Oct 2013 , 10:29am
post #119 of 136

A

Original message sent by cazza1

In Australia we have used fondant for forever.  We did not use buttercream (that was American) and royal Icing (that was English) for covering our cakes.  We did pipe with royal icing, however, and if you look back in the old books you will see that us fondant Aussies created the most magnificent delicate looking masterpieces (well maybe not me personally but I do have some passable attempts). I personally think that they left the American Style piped buttercream cakes of the same era for dead. Unfortunately, you very rarely see Extension Work (dubbed Australian String Work by Americans) with Lace edging anymore because it is extremely time consuming and I dare say very few people would be prepared to pay for it, whereas 35 years ago that was what everyone had.

That's true, but I'd be willing to bet that the majority of people who call themselves decorators today probably can't pipe worth a flip whether it's buttercream or royal. I'm not referring to what the cake is covered in, I'm just talking about people not knowing how to pipe a straight line. It's pretty amazing to me, because I just think that should be a basic skill. Just like knowing how to ice a cake smooth, or how to cover a cake in fondant.

embersmom Posted 18 Oct 2013 , 12:17pm
post #120 of 136

Quote:

Originally Posted by cazza1 
 

In Australia we have used fondant for forever.  We did not use buttercream (that was American) and royal Icing (that was English) for covering our cakes.  We did pipe with royal icing, however, and if you look back in the old books you will see that us fondant Aussies created the most magnificent delicate looking masterpieces (well maybe not me personally but I do have some passable attempts). I personally think that they left the American Style piped buttercream cakes of the same era for dead. Unfortunately, you very rarely see Extension Work (dubbed Australian String Work by Americans) with Lace edging anymore because it is extremely time consuming and I dare say very few people would be prepared to pay for it, whereas 35 years ago that was what everyone had.


I've got books in my cookbook collection which show Aussie String Work step by step.  I can understand why most cakers wouldn't want to attempt it.  Personally, I think one would have to possess nerves of steel.  I don't have nerves of steel, so I've never tried doing it.

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