My First Gum Paste Bouquet

Lounge By cakealicious7 Updated 18 Sep 2013 , 6:27pm by cakealicious7

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cakealicious7 Posted 14 Sep 2013 , 6:49pm
post #1 of 11

AThis is my first gumpaste bouquet, i'm really proud of it and thought I would share it with everyone. I would have liked more roses and leaves but I started off small :-D

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cakealicious7 Posted 14 Sep 2013 , 6:54pm
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Lil Peep Bakes Posted 18 Sep 2013 , 5:16pm
post #4 of 11

AWow!! Pretty!!

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milkmaid42 Posted 18 Sep 2013 , 5:26pm
post #5 of 11

You have a really good start on the rose. One thing you might consider when making a bouquet is that the rose leaves don't grow linearly down the stem. Try wiring 3, or 5 leaves to a single separate stem and then wrap that to the rose stem. The same thing applies to the flower, itself, unless it is a floribunda in which case the stems should be very short and attached close together. Look in a garden catalog or on line and you can see them in their natural configuration. You will achieve more realism that way. But you do have a right to be proud. You've done well.

 

Jan

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cakealicious7 Posted 18 Sep 2013 , 5:49pm
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A

Original message sent by Lil Peep Bakes

Wow!! Pretty!!

Thanks!!

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cakealicious7 Posted 18 Sep 2013 , 5:51pm
post #7 of 11

A

Original message sent by milkmaid42

You have a really good start on the rose. One thing you might consider when making a bouquet is that the rose leaves don't grow linearly down the stem. Try wiring 3, or 5 leaves to a single separate stem and then wrap that to the rose stem. The same thing applies to the flower, itself, unless it is a floribunda in which case the stems should be very short and attached close together. Look in a garden catalog or on line and you can see them in their natural configuration. You will achieve more realism that way. But you do have a right to be proud. You've done well.

Jan

Thankyou for your words of advice!! I think im going to purchase a garden catalogue because the images online can be a little hard to see. Thanks again

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letsgetcaking Posted 18 Sep 2013 , 6:09pm
post #8 of 11

Very pretty roses! I like how you curled the edges and the sparkles. For some reason, I've been avoiding attempting anything with gum paste. I'm not sure why. Some day I'll give it a go. Thanks for sharing.

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milkmaid42 Posted 18 Sep 2013 , 6:11pm
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You're more than welcome. One thing more you might consider is when making a full rose and not a bud, is to slightly "jag" the edges of the calyx and recurve them downwards. As the flower matures, the calyx loses its grip on the petals. It takes a little more trouble for it makes them more fragile to arrange, but certainly helps with the realism. You'll see this in your catalogs. I have a  number I subscribe to for I love gardening and love making sugar flowers.

 

I'll send you links to some of my favorites if you pm me.

 

Jan

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cakealicious7 Posted 18 Sep 2013 , 6:21pm
post #10 of 11

A

Original message sent by letsgetcaking

Very pretty roses! I like how you curled the edges and the sparkles. For some reason, I've been avoiding attempting anything with gum paste. I'm not sure why. Some day I'll give it a go. Thanks for sharing.

You should definitely try gum paste its sooo much fun!!! I used satin ice gum paste and lustre dust for the sparkly effects :-)

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cakealicious7 Posted 18 Sep 2013 , 6:27pm
post #11 of 11

A

Original message sent by milkmaid42

You're more than welcome. One thing more you might consider is when making a full rose and not a bud, is to slightly "jag" the edges of the calyx and recurve them downwards. As the flower matures, the calyx loses its grip on the petals. It takes a little more trouble for it makes them more fragile to arrange, but certainly helps with the realism. You'll see this in your catalogs. I have a  number I subscribe to for I love gardening and love making sugar flowers.

I'll send you links to some of my favorites if you pm me.

Jan

Thanks :-)

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