Hunterjh18 Posted 11 Sep 2013 , 6:26pm
post #1 of

So Im sorta a beginner at making cakes with fondants. I was going the cheap route and buying box cake batter and I found that it isn't strong enough for fondant and multiple cakes on top.

 

I have a birthday celebration for my boyfriend in November and im making him a 3 tiered cake and
I want to avoid the caving possibility. Plus I need some tasty recipes. Im just not sure which types of cakes are strong enough for what I planned on doing.

 

Thank for the help :) 

7 replies
leah_s Posted 11 Sep 2013 , 6:38pm
post #2 of

Your support system provides the, well, support for a tiered cake.  The cake itself doesn't support any weight at all, other than the icing.  

Hunterjh18 Posted 11 Sep 2013 , 6:50pm
post #3 of

Sorry if that was a dumb question. Still learning on my own. 

 

but thanks though...

Hunterjh18 Posted 11 Sep 2013 , 6:53pm
post #4 of

Im looking for recopies for strong cakes. Specifically. 

MimiFix Posted 11 Sep 2013 , 7:30pm
post #5 of

Consider making pound cakes.

Hunterjh18 Posted 12 Sep 2013 , 2:00am
post #6 of

Thank you :)

maybenot Posted 14 Sep 2013 , 2:50am
post #7 of

Mimi's suggestion is a good one, but there's no reason you can't stack box cakes--or jello--if you have the right support system--as Leah said.  Any cake will crush the one under it if the support isn't done properly.

 

Each cake tier needs to be on a cake board of the same size and then follow these instructions:

 

http://www.wilton.com/cakes/tiered-cakes/stacked-tiered-cake-construction.cfm

Hunterjh18 Posted 14 Sep 2013 , 4:49pm
post #8 of

Im pretty new at this, im kind of teaching myself as I go. I knew about the tier placement and everything, but i guess i didnt completely understand how it worked. lol I didnt realize there needs to be a cake board which makes sense now. I honestly thought the cakes just supported themselves. But this is definitely good to know. Thank you :)

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