Muscadine Grape Jelly

Lounge By smittyditty Updated 5 Sep 2013 , 5:49pm by milkmaid42

smittyditty Posted 2 Sep 2013 , 9:02pm
post #1 of 12

Anyone know what to add to take away the after bite sting of the wild grape? All the recipes I find are plain and simple pectin, sugar, grapes. Thanks for any help!

11 replies
smittyditty Posted 3 Sep 2013 , 12:07am
post #2 of 12

about to start canning process...guess nobody has made wild jam?? I've done it a lot but this particular variety seems to have a lot more kick. Would still like to know if someone has an answer...I have a lot to can and could switch ingredients midway if need be.
 

kikiandkyle Posted 3 Sep 2013 , 1:31pm
post #3 of 12

ASorry, I've never made jam!

smittyditty Posted 4 Sep 2013 , 12:21am
post #4 of 12

Well I got delayed last night so I'm smooshing grapes now. You should really try it sometime. Its not that complicated and once you do it once you'll be hooked. I like it because I have little ones and they go through a lot of Jelly. You can look on the Ball website and they have all the info you could ever want.

I'm just really surprised with all the culinary students no one had a secret tip for me. :) Note also to watch out for Poison Ivy/Oak while picking. Apparently I wasn't watching close enough and have a small outbreak on my arm. :-t

milkmaid42 Posted 4 Sep 2013 , 12:30am
post #5 of 12

I wish you were here in Missouri with me. I planted several Concords a few years ago and find that when they ripen, I am usually busy doing other things to pay them much heed. The vines are loaded at the moment, even taking into account all the raccoons and possums. I just don't have the energy I had 9 years ago when I envisioned making all the juice and jam I love. I'm hoping my younger neighbor will enjoy them. In fact, I wish I felt more like enjoying them myself. Putting up peaches and awaiting a heavy pear and apple crop are all I can handle anymore.

 

Jan

 

Edited to add: I'm alert to the poison ivy---we've had a "bumper crop" this year. What I'm scratching right now are the chiggers. I'm behind in mowing and it wasn't too wise of me to go out in nothing but flip flops. I'm paying the price.

smittyditty Posted 4 Sep 2013 , 1:05am
post #6 of 12

Jan-I'm sorry bout the chiggers those stink. I might have even gotten the poison oak from my chickens?? Not sure. If I was there I would so pick your grapes!

You can always post an ad in craigslist I see people do it all the time. They just aren't near me. Usually they trade you some jars of jam for letting them come pick.

So after researching while I'm juicing these things. I found that its Tartic Acid that is making the bite. Supposedly if I let the juice sit overnight the crystals will form in the morning and I can scrape it off so it wont be so stingy in the throat. These grapes are called "cut throat grapes" yeah not so pleasant.

smittyditty Posted 4 Sep 2013 , 1:33am
post #7 of 12

Jan-I'm sorry bout the chiggers those stink. I might have even gotten the poison oak from my chickens?? Not sure. If I was there I would so pick your grapes!

You can always post an ad in craigslist I see people do it all the time. They just aren't near me. Usually they trade you some jars of jam for letting them come pick.

So after researching while I'm juicing these things. I found that its Tartic Acid that is making the bite. Supposedly if I let the juice sit overnight the crystals will form in the morning and I can scrape it off so it wont be so stingy in the throat. These grapes are called "cut throat grapes" yeah not so pleasant.

milkmaid42 Posted 4 Sep 2013 , 2:23am
post #8 of 12

If memory serves me, I believe that your acid, if its tartaric acid, is what wine makers scrape  from the barrels to make cream of tartar. So, one man's meat, another's poison. At least that is the way it used to be made. They have no doubt synthesized it by now, or perhaps use a different method of obtaining it.

 

I can see why your grapes are given such a sinister nickname! :p

 

As to the grapes, my neighbor can use them and we share almost like having a convenience store next door. Just one of the fun perks of living out in the country.

 

 

Jan

vldutoit Posted 4 Sep 2013 , 11:50am
post #9 of 12

AMy grandpa used to make Muscadine wine. I am from East Texas and they grew wild when I was a kid. That makes sense.

smittyditty Posted 4 Sep 2013 , 3:37pm
post #10 of 12

Aso the juice sat in the refrigerator all night I didn't see any crystals lol so I guess its just gonna have some kick

smittyditty Posted 5 Sep 2013 , 5:34pm
post #11 of 12

Good news. If you don't mash the peels really well it is bitter. My friend made hers with a juicer and that was the problem hers had the bite and mine didn't!

So problem solved.

milkmaid42 Posted 5 Sep 2013 , 5:49pm
post #12 of 12

Glad to hear it. After all your work, it's great that the results are worth it.

 

Jan

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