acakedecorator Posted 29 Aug 2013 , 10:48pm
post #1 of

Ok, I mainly work with buttercream, so every time I go to roll out fondant to cover a cake, something goes wrong. My decorating instructor said to grease the surface you are rolling on with crisco. I found that didn't work for me because it would always stick and then I would end up stretching the fondant. So I started using powdered sugar. It sometimes works, but sometimes it dries out my fondant and makes it crack. So what do you guys roll out your fondant on? Any tips?

26 replies
jennicake Posted 29 Aug 2013 , 10:52pm
post #2 of

I know a lot of people are going to disagree with me on this (and for good reason, because there are a lot of better options out there) but the Wilton mat is cheap and actually pretty decent for a hobbyist.  I love mine!  The old one was a piece of garbage, but they seem to have redesigned it recently.  It feels thicker, rolls completely flat and fondant generally doesn't stick to it unless there is a problem with the fondant.  

 

What are you rolling out on now?  Definitely use a mat of some sort, I never had luck with rolling on a countertop.  

cakesbycathy Posted 29 Aug 2013 , 10:54pm
post #3 of

Try corn starch instead of powdered sugar
 

acakedecorator Posted 29 Aug 2013 , 11:17pm
post #4 of
Quote:

What are you rolling out on now?  Definitely use a mat of some sort, I never had luck with rolling on a countertop.  

 

I alternate between rolling it out on a silicone pastry mat and the old Wilton mat...the one that is just a thin sheet of plastic material that always wants to roll back up on me.

BatterUpCake Posted 29 Aug 2013 , 11:23pm
post #5 of

Corn starch will dry it out more than PS. I lift mine off the surface and flip it every so often. If it feel like it is starting to stick I throw down some more PS...

CraftyCassie Posted 29 Aug 2013 , 11:37pm
post #6 of

I use crisco on a Wilton mat. If its sticking I would think either there isn't enough crisco or the fondant is too sticky and needs more powdered sugar kneaded into it.

 

Good luck! 

howsweet Posted 30 Aug 2013 , 12:31am
post #7 of

There is no need to buy a wilton mat. I've been using a plain plastic sheet for years. The stuff I'm talking about is sold by the yard at places like JoAnns and it comes in a width of like 54 inches, so you can get it really big and  very inexpensively. It won't roll back up on you if placed on a granite counter - not sure about other surfaces. I keep mine on the counter - it's just sort of adhered. In a dryer climate, wipe the counter down with a damp paper towel.

 

When I first started I used shortening, but now I prefer cornstarch for rolling out fondant.

 

The secret is practice and it helps to have it demonstrated and to watch good tutorials. Don't ignore the advice about keeping a big skirt on it - makes a big difference.
 

Dayti Posted 30 Aug 2013 , 10:52am
post #8 of

I roll out on CS on stainless steel worktops. You only need to put CS just under your ball of fondant before rolling out, to keep the underside from sticking. Don't just shake it on the worktop - you will have used too much and your fondant will absorb it a lot of it, drying it out. I imagine the same would happen with PS. Keep lifting and turning your fondant 1/4 turn when rolling out to avoid sticking, adding a tiny bit more CS if necessary. 

maybenot Posted 30 Aug 2013 , 10:14pm
post #9 of

I hate "dust", so I roll on a piece of foodsafe vinyl--The Mat [sweetwise.com]--lightly conditioned with just the slightest swipe of crisco.  Craft store/fabric store vinyl is not intended for use with food.

 

No mess, no drying, no sticking, and the fondant is easily picked up by hand or on my rolling pin.  I put the back of the fondant (the side that was rolled on the crisco) onto the cake surface and use my fondant smoother.

dukeswalker Posted 30 Aug 2013 , 11:29pm

It depends on what fondant I'm using.  

MMF? I knead shortening into it and roll it out on powdered sugar.

Satin Ice? I use corn starch on the bottom but keep the top greased up (otherwise it sticks to the counter and dries out when I put it on the cake)

Fondex?  I little bit of corn starch and keep turning to ensure nothing is sticking

 

Oh - and I live in AZ where our indoor temps are around 80 and we *usually* have no humidity.

yortma Posted 31 Aug 2013 , 12:18am

The Mat and Massa Grischuna Neutral fondant.  Nothing else needed.  

BatterUpCake Posted 31 Aug 2013 , 12:38am

I wonder why so many people say they don't like the mat? I have been on the fence about getting one, but from this thread seems everyone likes it. Right now I use the Wilton silicone mat...off topic but I have been thinking of getting an extruder. I seen one on a tutorial that has a squeeze handle on the side. Anyone tried that? Is there any one brand that is better than another. SOrry it's OT. It just popped in my head...

howsweet Posted 31 Aug 2013 , 1:37am

I thought the mat was something you use to apply the fondant to the cake? Anyway, maybe I misunderstood some posts...  to clarify, I roll on the plastic, but don't use a mat to pick up the fondant.

DeliciousDesserts Posted 31 Aug 2013 , 1:44am

AThe mat is great for some fondants (Fondx, MMF, a few others) but terrible for others. It is not fondarific friendly. I'm a fondarific girl. You can have mine. Seriously. Tried it twice, rolled it up, & never used it again.

BatterUpCake Posted 31 Aug 2013 , 1:52am

I'll buy it off you if you are willing to ship!

maybenot Posted 31 Aug 2013 , 2:50am
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeliciousDesserts 

The mat is great for some fondants (Fondx, MMF, a few others) but terrible for others. It is not fondarific friendly. I'm a fondarific girl. You can have mine. Seriously. Tried it twice, rolled it up, & never used it again.


Right.  Fondarific & Duff's fondant are candy melt based and very high in fats.  Their directions advise that they be rolled out on PS.  If I'm using one of them, I capitulate and roll on PS.

 

I only roll ON a piece of The Mat.  I don't use it [the way it was intended] as a 2 piece "system" where you roll the fondant between the 2 sheets.  I don't want to use it to put the fondant on my cake--only for rolling the fondant.  I use a fondant smoother and want the surface of my fondant to be dry & smooth when doing so.

dukeswalker Posted 31 Aug 2013 , 2:57am
Quote:
Originally Posted by maybenot 


Right.  Fondarific & Duff's fondant are candy melt based and very high in fats.  Their directions advise that they be rolled out on PS.  If I'm using one of them, I capitulate and roll on PS.

 

I only roll ON a piece of The Mat.  I don't use it [the way it was intended] as a 2 piece "system" where you roll the fondant between the 2 sheets.  I don't want to use it to put the fondant on my cake--only for rolling the fondant.  I use a fondant smoother and want the surface of my fondant to be dry & smooth when doing so.

I have The Mat and had nothing but problems with the thing.  How do you use only the bottom?  How do you get it off The Mat and onto the cake?

BatterUpCake Posted 31 Aug 2013 , 3:06am

see just when I think I might get one along come folks who have problems with it...

maybenot Posted 31 Aug 2013 , 3:12am
Quote:
Originally Posted by dukeswalker 

I have The Mat and had nothing but problems with the thing.  How do you use only the bottom?  How do you get it off The Mat and onto the cake?


I adhere one Mat to my Corian counter using water. I smear on the thinnest film of crisco and then roll out the fondant.  I can either pick up the piece of fondant with my hands [if it's small enough] or pick it up on my rolling pin [I use the long Wilton pin] and then draping it over the cake.

 

IMG_2414

Courtesy of: http://undomesticdiva.com/2011/11/04/how-to-fake-a-fondant-cake/

 

Also seen here:  http://www.wilton.com/decorating/fondant/rolled-fondant.cfm

Smckinney07 Posted 31 Aug 2013 , 3:26am

AI've been thinking about getting The Mat as well. I use a large piece of Vinyl like HowSweet, it works fine. I have issues with buying new cake 'toys' they make The Mat look so easy though lol. What kind of fondant are you using? BatterUp, I read a lot of reviews on extruders and ended up buying was actually a clay extruder with a crank type handle it was such a pain I used it once and that's all! Now I want the big one they've been advertising in the CC magazine, it look like a gun. I would stay away from the crank handles, but maybe I just need to use it more.

BatterUpCake Posted 31 Aug 2013 , 10:19am

that sounds like the one I seen. It is used in the purse tutorial that was on the front page yesterday...don't know if it's still there. Don't know if you were asking me but I use MMF, SI and I am thinking of trying Pettinice since Restaurant Depot has it pretty cheap ($40/15lbs)

DeliciousDesserts Posted 31 Aug 2013 , 11:49am

APettinice is, in some was like MMF. It's a bit of a hibred. Fondx is the most like MMF (IMO).

I have the green extruder by Merkins. Marina Sousa uses it in one of her craftsy classes. Love it. Works great & is usually big enough. This last cake (gold, silver, & pearl) made me wish I had a bigger one. That was the first time.

Yes. Batterup, if you decide you want it, I'll send ya mine.

sixinarow Posted 31 Aug 2013 , 1:01pm

I had huge problems with Pettinice. It is so incredibly soft and stretchy, I had problems with rips and it was a pita trying to make ruffles. On the other hand, SINCE it's so soft, you can buff out tiny wrinkles and tears. But overall, the negative outweighed the positive with Pettinice for me. It's hard to find a fondant that you like, you just have to try a bunch of them to see which one you like best. If you've never tried it, make a batch of Michele Foster's fondant (mff) it's a lot smoother than mmf, holds up much better and I really like the workability. Fondant is a subjective thing!

JWinslow Posted 31 Aug 2013 , 1:06pm

I found I had to use the mat at least 4 times before it was seasoned to the point getting fondant off wasn't a big deal until recently.  You know how dark colored fondant can be more difficult?  I couldn't get it off the mat until I used some PS on the bottom mat and still ended up lifting it myself anyway. 

I agree with DD that it is good for some fondants and miserable with others.  I normally use Carma and have no problems with that.

 

Removing the fondant from the mat to the cake is a stretching motion of the mat  - not lifting the fondant.  There is a video that I watched a couple of times before I figured it out.  I prefer just lift for smaller cakes - I find it easier to position the fondant myself.  I do like the fact it is food safe vinyl. 

yortma Posted 31 Aug 2013 , 1:54pm

 

I cut and pasted this from  a post  I made in another discussion, so excuse the repetitiveness if you have  seen it before!  I still love the Mat.  It works very well with the "Massas".  I agree with the above posts,  Duff's and Fondarific don't work well with it because they stick and have pock marks.  I don't usually use those brands because I find them so difficult to work with, Mat or no Mat. Even so, I bought red and black fondarific recently to save time coloring.  It tasted great, but was so sticky and hard to work with I peeled it all off and threw it away.  Just not what I am used to working with.   Colored my usual Massa Grischuna neutral and it was perfect.   

 

---------

 

 

I have had the mat for 2 years and I love It.  I did a fondant test last year comparing 7 or 8 different types of fondant, and found that some are sticky and stretchy and hard to work with.  These also had a tendency to stick to the mat.  Without referring to my notes, I believe it was Duff's and Fondarific that are very soft and sticky.  I also found that there is a trick to working with the Mat that makes a huge difference.  I also don't recall this maneuver being stressed in the instruction video I watched last year.  The trick for me is to "release and flip"  frequently.  As the fondant is rolled out, it does tend to stick to the mat, and then becomes more and more difficult to get to roll out further and starts to grab and ripple.  (Just like rolling out cookie or pie dough with saran wrap - you must release the saran wrap now and then so the dough will spread and not stick.)  Another important factor of course, is finding the right fondant that handles well.  I use mostly Massa Grischuna or Carma Tropic, both of which handle beautifully.

 

1) place fondant between the 2 layers of the mat.  (I make a disc freehand, or with a roller on just the lower Mat at first to get a head start).

2) roll out from the center several times as shown in the video,

3) when it stops spreading as easily or starts to ripple, peel off the top layer and lay it back on again.  Then flip the whole thing over, and peel off the bottom (now top) layer and replace.  

4) Roll out this new side a few times until the spreading slows, and/or ripples are occurring, and then "release and flip" again

5) repeat.....

 

Each time you release, you can check for and pop any air bubbles.  The releasing prevents wrinkles, facilitates spread,  and keeps it from really sticking at the end.

 

Just before placing on the cake, release the mat to see which side looks best and should be the outside.  With the good side up, release and replace the mat and pat or roll a time or two to just slightly stick it down.   Flip it over and  peel off the Mat.   It is ready to apply to the cake.  When finished and on the cake, the outer exposed surface should be nice and smooth, and should have separated easily because it was pre-released.

 

HTH!

BatterUpCake Posted 31 Aug 2013 , 1:58pm

good info Yortma. Thanks

JWinslow Posted 1 Sep 2013 , 1:05am
Quote:
Originally Posted by yortma 

 

I cut and pasted this from  a post  I made in another discussion, so excuse the repetitiveness if you have  seen it before!  I still love the Mat.  It works very well with the "Massas".  I agree with the above posts,  Duff's and Fondarific don't work well with it because they stick and have pock marks.  I don't usually use those brands because I find them so difficult to work with, Mat or no Mat. Even so, I bought red and black fondarific recently to save time coloring.  It tasted great, but was so sticky and hard to work with I peeled it all off and threw it away.  Just not what I am used to working with.   Colored my usual Massa Grischuna neutral and it was perfect.   

 

---------

 

 

I have had the mat for 2 years and I love It.  I did a fondant test last year comparing 7 or 8 different types of fondant, and found that some are sticky and stretchy and hard to work with.  These also had a tendency to stick to the mat.  Without referring to my notes, I believe it was Duff's and Fondarific that are very soft and sticky.  I also found that there is a trick to working with the Mat that makes a huge difference.  I also don't recall this maneuver being stressed in the instruction video I watched last year.  The trick for me is to "release and flip"  frequently.  As the fondant is rolled out, it does tend to stick to the mat, and then becomes more and more difficult to get to roll out further and starts to grab and ripple.  (Just like rolling out cookie or pie dough with saran wrap - you must release the saran wrap now and then so the dough will spread and not stick.)  Another important factor of course, is finding the right fondant that handles well.  I use mostly Massa Grischuna or Carma Tropic, both of which handle beautifully.

 

1) place fondant between the 2 layers of the mat.  (I make a disc freehand, or with a roller on just the lower Mat at first to get a head start).

2) roll out from the center several times as shown in the video,

3) when it stops spreading as easily or starts to ripple, peel off the top layer and lay it back on again.  Then flip the whole thing over, and peel off the bottom (now top) layer and replace.  

4) Roll out this new side a few times until the spreading slows, and/or ripples are occurring, and then "release and flip" again

5) repeat.....

 

Each time you release, you can check for and pop any air bubbles.  The releasing prevents wrinkles, facilitates spread,  and keeps it from really sticking at the end.

 

Just before placing on the cake, release the mat to see which side looks best and should be the outside.  With the good side up, release and replace the mat and pat or roll a time or two to just slightly stick it down.   Flip it over and  peel off the Mat.   It is ready to apply to the cake.  When finished and on the cake, the outer exposed surface should be nice and smooth, and should have separated easily because it was pre-released.

 

HTH!


Nice!  I seem to recall a video than discouraged releasing the top mat so as not to trap air however flipping and releasing is something I will definitely try.  Thanks for the tip. :)

 

jeanne

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